Yet another electrical question on a WW tool

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Leon wrote:

Wheel in the sky keeps on turning; Don't know where I'll be to-morrrr--arrr--oow; Duh-da-dut-durrr..
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On Fri, 18 Oct 2013 11:30:48 -0500, Swingman wrote:

Oh, this is number one and the fun has just begun ...
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"Larry Blanchard" wrote:

Roll me over, lay me down and do it again.....
Lew
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On Fri, 18 Oct 2013 17:00:25 -0700, Lew Hodgett wrote:

Or: Roll her over in the clover, do it again."
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"Larry Blanchard" wrote:

Roll me over, lay me down and do it again.....
Lew ------------------------------------------------------------------- Or: Roll her over in the clover, do it again."
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Lew
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On 10/18/2013 9:30 AM, Swingman wrote:

ukelele firmly imprinted. Grumble. Snort.
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wrote:

the same sized package.
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WRONG. If the GFCI is tripping because one or the other of the circuit conductors is leaking to ground, rewiring the motor for 240V will do absolutely nothing to change that -- and hence absolutely nothing to alter the existing shock hazard. [...]

He's already tried it with multiple GFCIs with no change in behavior. Why would you think that yet another one would make any difference?

No, it cannot, not in compliance with the National Electrical Code.
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< snips >

.... hang a picture on the wall & call it "finished " ! Also - I'd check with a real life electrician or Inspector before asking an electrical engineer .. John T.
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circuit and it popped right away.
Obvious conclusion: the problem is not the GFCIs.

protected by a GFCI. I guess all I have to do is finish the basement and I won't need no stinkin' GFCI.

In heaven's name, WHY? Isn't it clear already that the problem is the jointer, not the GFCI?

Wrong solution. If the trouble persists, you need to find out what's wrong with the jointer before "get on with your life" turns into "abbreviate your life" by electrocution. That GFCI is tripping for a REASON. The reason is that your jointer is leaking current to ground -- which means that its frame is becoming energized. And *that* means that you could receive a fatal shock from touching it.
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On Fri, 18 Oct 2013 11:14:18 +0000 (UTC), Doug Miller

One thing I haven't seen is to thouroughly inspect the cord for any potential damage all it takes is a pin hole. Any sign of stress or compression to the cord could have damaged the internal insulation. If the cord cap isn't a molded type inspect it as well. If you have a meter you can check for continuity between ground and either conductor. Since it used to work OK you do have to be concerned with a potential hazard.
Mike M
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On 10/18/2013 7:14 AM, Doug Miller wrote:

Doug, You are coming to the party late. This has been discussed all week.
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On 10/18/2013 10:29 AM, Bill wrote:

Regardless, Doug is arguably one of the most informed posters here today with regard to electrical code issues, and a good deal of troubleshooting to boot.
Pay attention ... sometimes it is best to let the kibitzing dust settle first. ;)
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Swingman wrote:

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I know -- I thought I'd better chime in, when I saw the OP about to decide to "solve" a problem that sure looks to me like a jointer with a ground fault by taking away the ground-fault protection.
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On Fri, 18 Oct 2013 11:14:18 +0000 (UTC), Doug Miller

a shock off of it. The frame will always be at fround potential, If the leakage gets bad enough it will kick a regular breaker.
GFCI protection is BASICALLY for un-grounded equipment.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote in

Nonsense. If he makes a second, parallel path to ground through his body, and the case is energized, some of that current *will* flow through his body. Hopefully, it won't be enough to do him any damage.

Think that through just a bit farther, will you?
The current required to trip a breaker is THREE ORDERS OF MAGNITUDE greater than the current required to stop a human heart from beating. It doesn't take nearly as much leakage current to pose a risk to human life as it takes to trip a breaker.

Wrong. GFCI protection is BASICALLY for the protection of human life, REGARDLESS of what type of electrical equipment said human is using.
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Hello All,
I am the OP (if that means original poster). I very much appreciate all the follow-up. I too am concerned as to why this happens.
I need the weekend to pull the motor and have a look. Some additional info on my set-up:
1. The jointer is plugged into a string of outlets I have mounted on the first floor joists. I am in the basement so the outlets are overhead.
2. The power cord has a molded in plug.
3. The power cord runs straight up from the jointer to the outlet and is protected from abuse. It is mounted next to and in the shadow of the DC ducting.
In conversations I have had, some folks have suggested that motors and GFCI outlets don't play together nice which is why you are warned to not plug your freezer into a GFCI outlet. OK, I accept that but I had several years without an issue.
I sure hope that after I pull the motor and open all the covers, I something loose, or chaffed or covered with a lot of dust. That I could fix. If I find nothing, I'm not sure how to proceed.
Bill L.
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It does.

As you should be. Motors that have absolutely nothing wrong with them can cause nuisance trips on GFCIs due to voltage and current being out-of-phase in an inductive load -- and trips can also be caused by current leakage. As I noted in another post, it doesn't take very much current to interrupt your heart, and so this needs to be taken seriously.

This is true.

And this is why I think you are right to be concerned.

I think my next step, on finding nothing, would be to remove the motor from the jointer and see if it still trips the GFCI -- if so, I'd take it to a motor repair shop and ask them what they make of it.
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On Fri, 18 Oct 2013 21:27:54 +0000 (UTC), Doug Miller

Does it trip under load as well? If not it could be a power factor issue (current out of phase with voltage) - which is always better under load.
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