Yellow glue or ??? for Adirondack chair?

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"Steve Turner" wrote:

I probably have left more epoxy unused in the bottom of the bucket than a 1,000 repairs like this would use.
The point being that since I buy epoxy in 500 pound drums (55 gal), I get a very good price on the stuff so can't really comment on the retail price of epoxy; however, epoxy pricing is very much quantity sensitive.
Prices in the $60-$90 for a gallon kit are not uncommon.
As far as the viscosity issue is concerned, anything above 60F on the low end and out of direct sunlight on the high end works for me.
As far as proper mixing is concerned, throw away plastic cups (1OZ thru 4OZ) insure accurate mixing.
A 30 lb bag of micro-balloons is about $25 which will last most people at least two lifetimes.
Unless you want to develop contact dermatitis, you WILL use disposable latex gloves which leave no fingerprints<G>.
DAMHIKT.
If you need long open times, epoxy and a SLOW hardener will give you 30 minutes with out pushing it.
TiteBond II is less than half that, can't comment on T/B III.
Guess the message is that like anything else, if you follow the known epoxy mixing and handling rules, the rewards are worth it.
T/BIII doesn't show me it it worth the shelf space in my shop, but then I'm prejudiced.
Lew
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Prof Wonmug wrote:

I presume you mean that he split a piece off of one of the arms?
Personally I'd get out my old can of Weldwood Plastic Resin Glue. The stuff's hard to find nowadays and you have to buy a pound of it for ten bucks or so (that pound will likely last you the rest of your life) but it's good stuff. As for durability, it's FAA approved for structural use on production aircraft. Epoxy has all the glamor these days but the old workhorse is cheap and good. Do read the label though and use it exactly as directed.
Another alternative, find the nearest Woodcraft and see what they've got--they should have T88 epoxy in a 1.6 ounce syringe for 20 bucks or so--that should do the job nicely.
Or Titebond III--it's not going to be immersed and there should be enough irregularity in the split to serve as a key and prevent creep.
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Use carpenters "waterproof" wood glue. Titebond or Elmers. I have two redwood Adirondack chairs, going on their 16th year. I use a clear "Flood" product, goes on milky and dries clear. (The instructions say it dires in 24 hours, but it remains sticky for a week.) You can bring back the red color if you clean it.
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