Yellow glue or ??? for Adirondack chair?

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"Steve Turner" wrote:

I have a question.
Unless you really have a love affair with the chair, wouldn't you be farther ahead if:
A) You purchased new chairs?
B) Built news chairs using a plan with a better design or at least better suited to your usage?
Just curious.
Lew
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On Mon, 21 Sep 2009 21:43:56 -0700, "Lew Hodgett"

I offered to buy her a new chair. She wants that one because her son made it for her.

See answer to (a).

I'm looking for the easiest way to prolong the life a little.
If I get some spare time (unlikely), I might just take it all apart and reassemble it.
What's the best way to open joints that are loose but not falling apart? Just wait until they do fall apart?
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Not at the mass-produced quality level typically seen these days.

These have all been antique chairs with fairly decent design, but with the old hide-glue joints that just can't stand up to the rigors of time. It's amazing how many friends and relatives can come out of the woodwork when they've heard you have the ability to fix old furniture. I've probably rebuilt a dozen or more old chairs that used to belong to Aunt Edith or next door neighbor Bart's grandpappy.
--
"Our beer goes through thousands of quality Czechs every day."
(From a Shiner Bock billboard I saw in Austin some years ago)
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Yeah, but the news spreads when there's a local woodworker that can fix chairs (and fix them properly). That takes a particularly uncommon skill or at least most people think so.
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wrote:

chair!!! He's redone qite a few for friends and neighbours that are now better than new - with all kinds af parts replaced, repaired, and remanufactured. It's a real art!!!
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Here's some info on the chair I just finished:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/bbqboyee/3945385446 /
At the risk of pissing off the Antiques Road Show gods, I decided to forgo any attempts to retain the original black "japanning" on all the steel and cast iron parts in the seat support mechanism (this thing has dual tilt springs with cast iron receivers, and a height adjustment mechanism with a 1-1/8" lead-screw!). I ran all the metal parts through the sandblast cabinet, then applied a black oxide finish (similar to gun metal bluing) available from Caswell Plating (http://www.caswellplating.com/kits/index.html ).
Apart from the regular disassembly and re-gluing of all the old hide-glue joints, I had to "rebuild" the dovetails on the ends of the legs, re-cutting the shoulders to add a bit of depth and gluing shim stock to the faces to add thickness, all so the legs would once again fit tightly into the cast iron receiver. I also had to reinstall new seat caning, which I'd never done before, and I highly recommend this site: http://www.seatweaving.org/ for supplies and instructions if you ever have to do the same.
A fun project all in all, and my friend was quite happy to get his favorite old chair back. I understand I now have an endless supply of free beer any time I want to go over and shoot the breeze! :-)
--
"Even if your wife is happy but you're unhappy, you're still happier
than you'd be if you were happy and your wife was unhappy." - Red Green
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I used a pair of those on my last epoxy job. They really helped make the task a breeze--especially when wiping off the excess.

I recently stopped in at Goodwill to buy more pants for yard work. Turned out they had one pair that fit me but they are nicer than the pants I usually wear, and like new. So I still need to buy more pants for yard work... ;)
Bill
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wrote:

Reminds me of the joke about the guy who couldn't afford to send his shirts to the cleaners, so he donated them to the Goodwill, then went in and bought them back for 25 cents after they cleaned them. ;-)
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On Thu, 17 Sep 2009 22:14:03 -0700, "Lew Hodgett"

Denatured alcohol is just ethyl alcohol with some stuff added to make undrinkable, right?
I have a bottle of rubbing alcohol. It says it's 70% ethyl alcohol. The inactive ingredients are acetone, denatonium benzoate, methyl isobutyl ketone, and water. Can I use it to dilute the epoxy?
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"Prof Wonmug" wrote:

Leave that crap in the medicine cabinet.
It contains water.
No good for epoxy.
Lew
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On Fri, 18 Sep 2009 09:27:56 -0700, "Lew Hodgett"

Crap? Have you tried it with a little OJ or a beer chaser?
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"Prof Wonmug" wrote:

Stay away from the quick (1-5 minute) stuff.
If you are anywhere near a West Marine store they will have West System in all kind of kits which will include mixing sticks, mixing cups, gloves, etc.
May be a little pricey, but it's "One Stop Shopping" and probably every clerk in there has done some epoxy repair of some kind.
Have fun.
Lew
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On Wed, 09 Sep 2009 00:19:45 GMT, "Lew Hodgett"

Yep, there's one about 20-30 minutes away. But with my history with epoxy, wouldn't I be in mortal danger with a marine epoxy? I'd hate to get my mast stuck to the wrong thing...
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"Prof Wonmug" wrote:

I know it sounds crazy, but..................
READ THE DIRECTIONS FIRST.
BTW, you have all variety of epoxy retaiklers in the Bay area.
You are not limited to W/M.
Have fun.
Lew
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Is it really that difficult to keep your hands off of your mast for an entire 30 minutes cure time?

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On Tue, 08 Sep 2009 16:49:12 -0700, Prof Wonmug wrote:

While epoxy may be the best solution, if you're hesitant to use it I think you'd do fine with Titebond III. Unless you're storing the chair underwater :-).
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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I think just yellow glue would be insufficient as it is not outdoor nor waterproof. - shear strength is needed in the repair that the glue may not be able to provide.
I would suggest epoxy, as it is waterproof, and can give the strength needed. Depending on the break, consider adding a spline or biscuit to ensure shear strength is added back. This might make a nearly invisible repair.
The son who built the chair, may have a recommendation. He may even still have the pattern and be able to produce a new arm.

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Prof Wonmug wrote:

Everybody's suggesting epoxy, but wouldn't this be a good candidate for Titebond III? I've used it on some exterior repairs and so far it's been bulletproof...
--
"Even if your wife is happy but you're unhappy, you're still happier
than you'd be if you were happy and your wife was unhappy." - Red Green
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"Steve Turner" wrote:

When it comes to repairs, quality epoxy is in a class by itself, if for no other reason than it's ability to fill gaps and provide strength in the process.
Again, for outdoor repairs, epoxy is in a class by itself.
Note the emphasis on "REPAIRS".
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

I've been using epoxy for probably half your life (a *long* time - LOL) so I'm no stranger to it, but given the condition of the chair and how much life is probably left in it I just think Titebond III would be a no-brainer. There are just so many variables with epoxy; viscosity, fillers, mixing ratios, curing times, special solvents required for cleanup, etc. (not to mention that the good shit is *expensive*). And dried-out redwood is going to *drink* that stuff if it's too runny and/or slow curing; the joint will be weak if that happens. And if it's me, I'm sure as hell going to get little drops of epoxy all over the place; on my fingers, on the workpiece, fingerprints on the workpiece... Just give me some Titebond III and a couple of clamps and I'm done.
Sorry Lew. :-)
--
"Even if your wife is happy but you're unhappy, you're still happier
than you'd be if you were happy and your wife was unhappy." - Red Green
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