Yellow Glue and 30 Degree Shop


I think that I know this answer, but I'll ask anyway. Am I asking for trouble trying to use my Titebond II when the temps are getting on the cold side? For me "cold" is actually anything below 70 degrees, after living in Hawaii for 5 years. But around here ( American Fork, Utah ) the temps are in the mid 20s at night and today it barely got past 32 deg ( F, by the way ). So will my glue just freeze and never "do it's thing?" or can I glue my stuff, be patient and wait a day or two?
Thanks in advance, Jon in American Fork
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I thought I read somewhere on the directions that application temperature had to be above 50 F. I just went to www.titebond.com where they state application temperature should be above 55 F.
I do not think the resulting bond will be as strong as desired if the joint is subjected to freezing before the glue has set.
Dave Paine.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Speaking from experience. Last winter, I glued up a large panel in my 'garage' shop with minimal heat. I came back a few hrs later (my feet were cold) and the glue mostly froze, although it did bite enough for me bring the assy indoors (livingroom) for knock down and regluing. It came apart too easy, meaning the glue froze long before it could set. An indicator of freezing glue is instead of turning clear, it 'dries' white. Oh yeah, It was 32C below .
Pete
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks guys, for making up for my laziness and not reading the label. I have since moved my project indoors and plan on enlisting the aid of the dining room table after everything warms up.
Jon

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sun, Nov 27, 2005, 4:48pm (EST-2) snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net (JonH) doth put out: I think that I know this answer, but I'll ask anyway. Am I asking for trouble trying to use my Titebond II when the temps are getting on the cold side?
Then why ask?
Yes.
If you had read the label on the back of the bottle, along with other good information, including a 1-800 number you can call, it clearly states: "Do not use when temperature, glue or materials, are below 55F."
Gosh, this group is really getting boring again.
JOAT A rolling stone gathers no moss...unless it's a hobby he does on the weekends.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If you had read the label on the back of the bottle, along with other good information, including a 1-800 number you can call, it clearly states: "Do not use when temperature, glue or materials, are below 55F."
That is the chalk point... when you see it you'll kno wwhy they call it that.
BTW for TB-I (classic titebond) it's 50 for TB - III it's 47.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
JonH wrote:

One thing to be careful about...most PVA glues are only rated for a certain number of freeze/thaw cycles in the bottle. After that, they can go bad.
Chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.