Yeeee-Hah!!!

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Bruce Barnett wrote:

I don't think that you have to assume the worst in people, just a litigious society and a terrified school board. In other words, standard operating conditions.
Dave in Fairfax
--
Dave Leader
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Dave in Fairfax wrote:

You have _no_ idea how torqued the cops get when you use your trebuchet to loft a watermelon over a building and onto the hood of a passing police car.
DAMHIKT.
--RC
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Rick Cook wrote:

They don't much care for apples with glass imbedded in them either.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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You wouldn't think high-school *KITE*FLYING* contest would get the cops upset, either, would you?
Well, except for the fact that some of the kids were building *BIG* kites. e.g. an 8 _foot_ tall 'tetrahedron' kite. They found out that that kite had more lift than they expected. They'd been flying for half an hour, or so -- kite was out at the end of several _hundred_ yards of heavy-duty kite string, Then the wind picked up a bit. *and* a gust came by. This turned out to be more than that poor kite-string could bear. And it *broke*. Somewhere up close to the kite itself.
Down comes like a -third_of_a_mile_ of string. Over trees, houses, streets, power lines, and anything else underneath it's path.
The -kite- on the other hand, is drifting away, down-wind, _and_ slowly falling out of the sky. Does a bullseye right in the _middle_ of the intersection of two *busy* streets, almost 2 miles away from the school. By some miracle, it didn't hit any cars -- there were a couple of _very_ close calls however, when the driver flinched as this thing 'materialized' beside and/or in front of their car.
OH boy, does traffic get snarled! There's only about 1 lane open "around" the obstruction; not to mention the "gapers block" with everybody going through the scene at about 2 MPH, as thy speculate on "what in the h*ll" this contraption is.
"Of course", the police get notified. but when the 1st officer shows up at the scene, _he_ hasn't got the faintest idea what this thing is, _either_, nor what to do about it. Is it 'safe' to move it, or not? *who*knows*?!!
Disclaimer: this was *NOT* _my_ kite, although, I was, in a way, partly to blame, having been one of the instigators of the 'bigger kites', one-upmanship; _and_ introduced the first 'unconventional' designs into the contest. That year, I was flying a 'winged corvette kite' (aka a "French war kite") -- a 6 foot tall one, with *bolted*together* 2x2s as the structural members, and flown on 400lb(!!) test braided nylon cord. That kite wasn't big enough to be considered as 'man carrying'. Quite. <grin>
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On Sun, 20 Feb 2005 04:08:49 -0000, the inscrutable snipped-for-privacy@host122.r-bonomi.com (Robert Bonomi) spake:
--megasnip--

But it was big enough to take out a pedestrian, huh? Next thing ya know, ol' Shrubby will be outlawing kite flying in the name of (you guessed it) National Security. <sigh>
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"Boy, I feel safer now that Martha Stewart is behind bars!
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"John Moorhead" wrote in message

Congratulations! Now, go buy a hickory baseball bat, take it straight to the shop planer and ..... oops. sorry. Wrong century! :)
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 11/06/04
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Sat, Feb 19, 2005, 4:24pm (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.splinter.net (JohnMoorhead) spookiely says: <snip> I go over for assimilation on Tuesday, <snip>
Gods above, you make it sound like the Borg is taking people by appointment now.
JOAT Intellectual brilliance is no guarantee against being dead wrong. - David Fasold
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After reading your post, I was all prepared to jump in with advice, then I read the rest of the responses and, WOW, I have to say this is the best group of responses I have seen to a post in a while.
Great advice from the group. Now, I have never taught WW but I have taught 10 years of adult education in Photography, communications electronics and computer systems so I'll add my $.02.
Prepare, practice, validate your ideas and then do it again. Someone posted about keeping it interesting, that is extremely important and remember to teach to the median of the group. As much as you would love to teach to intricate stuff, you have to keep the slower students interested. Someone else posted about bring real life experience to the class, like building permits, Another great idea.
Have fun, the nerves will calm down a few minutes into class if you are prepared and confident.

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Congrats! And high five. (And keep it that way.)
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Congrats.
To the others' list of excellent advice I can only add:
- The first mistake that new teachers always make is to tell the class that "this is the first class I've ever taught." Doing so advertises your own natural anxiety at being up there at all, cedes authority and control to the students, and is just asking for trouble. To the students you should just be "the new shop teacher" -- which is something they already know -- so you don't even have to mention it. Just do your thing. When they see that you know what you're doing and that you love doing it, they'll be with you.
- The second mistake that new teachers make is that they have abolutely forgotten what it was like to have to learn the subject in the first place. You now work reflexively, without thinking. The kids are going to fumble about. No concept is too trivial, no demonstration too slow.
- The third mistake is that by "planning a lesson in advance" an instructor concerns himself mostly with the subject matter and the manner of its delivery. While important, that's not enough. The projects or assignments that you give should have been completed by you first, at home, as part of your lesson plan development. This is a corollary to mistake #2 above, I think.
As for positive suggestions, see what you can do to integrate some of the mathematics they're studying into your class. Trigonometry would be a natural fit.
And most of all, enjoy this. Teaching is absolutely, positively rewarding.
J.
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Congrats!!
You are DAMN LUCKY! I avoided going into teaching because of the lack of such opportunities. In my area, they are phasing industrial arts out of schools. It started before I graduated HS 10 years ago. I guess it's easier to stick kids in front of computers instead of teaching them how to make a living.
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Hi John,
You've got a lot of responses here and a lot of them say a lot of good things.
I taught 7th through 9th grade for 30 years before retiring (not shop, but math & science).
FWIW:
1. Be *VERY* prepared every day - for twice as much material as you think that you would need.
**1a. Be *VERY* prepared every day - for twice as much material as you think that you would need.
**Intentionally printed twice!!!!
2. Respect the kids - watch your "tone" and be *VERY* evenhanded. You will not teach anyone anything until you have respect & discipline.
3. Respect yourself - don't accept any behavior which you consider "abnormal" as normal just because you have not taught before or think that you are too "OLD". Kids will love that flannel shirt if they learn to respect what it stands for. (I know - it's a preposition.)
4. Use common sense - if you do not have a disciplined class, no teaching will take place. You will only be a "good guy" for a few days, then teaching will become impossible and you will be very discouraged. Trying to be "liked" is a *BIG* mistake. Instead, try to earn respect - keep trying, because you never finish.
5. You will have problems with parents. Keep cool & be professional. Have your grades very organized and your method of grading spelled out precisely - have parents read it at "open house" and explain why you do it. If it does not make sense, change it. Don't be afraid to admit you are wrong - especially as a new teacher.
This will get you through your first few months. As you go along, you will learn from your colleagues.
Teaching is about change, so get used to it & try to embrace it. Eventually, you will actually be able to show your love of the subject you teach. Just remember that at first, this is the least important thing you need show. The kids need to get to know you first.
Best of luck to you!
Lou (Enjoying retirement in my shop!)

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You listed this a number four, but it should be number ONE.
Thinking back to the teacher that taught me the most and I liked the best, it was the tougher, fair, and demanding discipline ones. They started out by letting us know "I'm here to teach, you are her to learn, and if we do our jobs we will get along just fine". Of course, this we long before the days of having an ACLU lawyer in every classroom.
There will always be one student that will test your limits. How you handle him will set the tone for the rest of the year. Be form, be fair.
Good luck John, it will be tough but can be very rewarding.
--
Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/



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Many congratulations, John!
It's been a long while since I did the interview/wait for the call gig, but I do remember how goood that "when can you start" call feels!
djb
--
"The thing about saying the wrong words is that A, I don't notice it, and B,
sometimes orange water gibbon bucket and plastic." -- Mr. Burrows
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John Moorhead wrote:

Reminds me of the last time I went to traffic court. "You're a TRUCK DRIVER?" I guess he thought I was a lawyer, and I guess I look better in a suit than you do, but I'm still far more likely to be spotted clad in flannel.
(You know, actually, that *wasn't* the last time I was in traffic court. It was just the only time I got the ticket expunged. The other two times, they reduced the fine. After that initial experience, I figured out that I was the only one in the world who went to traffic court in a suit. Maybe I should have stuck with the suit, neh?)

You're going to be teaching at the BORG?

Oh, and congratulations!
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
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Everybody who shows up and makes sawdust gets and A or a B A "B" is the same as an ""A" except they cut themselfs and had to go to the nurse sometime during the year. The lower grade reflects the paperwork you had to do to explain the accident.
Any way thats how it was 25 years ago in my woodshop class.

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Congrats John,
I teach medical equipment repair for the military, the only advise I will impart (since everything else was already covered) is this: the three most important topics you will be teaching in this (any) "industrial" environment are safety, safety and safety. The woodshop teacher at my HS (21 years ago) lost a finger to the band saw - TWICE. He got more concerned with looking at the class while lecturing on how to properly push a piece of wood thru the saw, instead of paying attention to what he was doing. Just be careful not to scare them away from the equipment, just a healthy respect will do.
Have fun with it. It is classes like these that will restore your faith in the younger generations.
PS: I like the idea (mentioned earlier) about incorporating some of the math lessons into your class. Just be sure to use it the same way the math teacher does, and that your students have actually been taught the math you will be using (or it could wind up as an exercise in frustration for them). But, it will show how math is used in the "real" world.
Congrats again.
John C

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