Yave you done this yet?

Page 3 of 3  
Silvan responds:

You think? My father went nuts when I bought a new Chevy convertible in '57. Just under 3 grand. That was the 283, dual 4s, close ratio column 3 speed and absolute shit for brakes and gas mileage, though that sucker would fly. He had bought 2 new cars when he and my mother got married in '34: under a grand, well under, and one was a car I'd kill for today, a rumble seat Ford coupe.
Of course, there are people today who will just about kill for that '57, but that's a "been there, done that" and scared myself spitless a few times with the handling and brakes. It was wonderful at 19, but not now.
Comparable car today? $45,000? Better, sure, but...
Charlie Self "One of the common denominators I have found is that expectations rise above that which is expected." George W. Bush
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Charlie Self wrote:

Or not pessimistic enough? :)

Yeah, Dad came home with a '57 Bel Aire one day. A friend of his is a Jay Leno wannabe. I drove it a little. Beautiful car. Cherry. Gorgeous. But it weighed 400,000 pounds and it only had about 1/16 oz. of brake fluid in the ultra miniature master cylinder. Holy shit dude, WTF were they thinking back then? No power steering either. Pretty to look at, but it really sucked to drive. That ended my infatuation with the '57 Chevy forever.
I kind of outgrew cars more generally anyway though, really. Cars are one huge black hole for cashola. A habit I never could afford, and I finally stopped daydreaming about it.

That expensive, really? What sets it apart as being a $45,000 car? Just the chick factor? I'd say it's more of a $25,000 car, but maybe I'm dreaming.
Everything is relative though. My grandfather paid $3,000 for a house in 1950-something, and he paid $3,000 for a car in 1970-something, and he paid $3,000 for pills in 2004.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Silvan asks:

Not exactly "What they were thinking," but the spot on the technological history line that was probable at the time---disk brakes weren't available, power steering, IIRC, was but was pricey as hell, and hey weren't really that bad to drive...in a straight line.

Performance. Plain tire squealing performance. Today, they've added handling and stopping power and are getting similar speed from much smaller engines (mechanical fuel injection was available on the engine I got, but it added about $425 extra to the under 3K price; almost everything on the market today has EF and dual overhead cams instead of Duntov's 3/4 race single cam in the block...but that small block Chev is still made today, and is probably the single most popular engine ever designed).>Everything is relative though.

It kind of works that way. My mother bought her retirement home in Huddleson for $11,500 in '78. Try to find ANY kind of home for $11,500 in Bedford County today.
Charlie Self "They want the federal government controlling Social Security like it's some kind of federal program." George W. Bush, St. Charles, Missouri, November 2, 2000
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Charlie Self wrote:

As long as you didn't need to stop. Stopping was a real problem for those things. First I almost ran a stop sign, then I looked at the master cylinder and scratched my head. Yoiks.
Maybe all drum brake systems need less fluid than drum/disc or disc/disc come to think of it, but it sure wasn't very reassuring to look at.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 23 Jan 2005 12:32:15 -0500, Silvan

Knew a guy who had a 68 Plymouth Barracuda with 426 Max Wedge and a 4 speed. That sucker would flat haul a**! Only problem was that it had 8" drum brakes on the front and 6" drums on the rear. You could literally stop it faster with engine compression than with the brakes.
Handled pretty good on the curves though.
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

With brakes like that, it had to. :-)

+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ The absence of accidents does not mean the presence of safety
Army General Richard Cody +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tim Douglass wrote:

A friend of mine in high school had a '67 Hemicuda. He ultimately destroyed it getting T-boned by an '87 Monte Carlo.
It put his head through the window and banged him up good, but I still cry more for the poor 'Cuda than my friend's thick skull. Dumbass. What a car. :(
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 25 Jan 2005 21:56:23 -0500, Silvan

Stop, stop! You're making me cry! I've always lusted after a Hemi Cuda. Love those old Mopars!

I've had some friends like that...
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 23 Jan 2005 09:11:47 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote:
... snip

But look at what wages were back then as well compared to now. Entry level engineers are making better than twice what entry level engineers were making in the late '70s and '80s; I'm sure that other careers are equivalently changed as well.

+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Silvan wrote:

That's not a bad price for the home, but then I suppose you're forecasting rampant inflation with a concurrent collapse of the housing market. As to the Bugger King lunch, that's probably the super-cholesterolized version, which we're better off without. Yep, I guess everybody needs a little gloom in their lives.     zorp,     jo4hn
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote:

Perhaps the lesson is "don't glue up stuff on your table saw?" I know I never will again!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 19 Jan 2005 21:08:31 GMT, "Leon"

leon you need to come by later and clean the cup o hot chocolate off my keyboard :-]> ONE more push otta do it!!! lmao
skeez
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote: [snip] The first leg glue goes fine but as I am working on the 3 piece of

I have a bottle of TBII that is a year or so old. Lately I have noticed that the glue clumps and won't come out of the bottle elegantly. I remove the top of the bottle, ream it out with a 6d nail, and it works fine for a while. I blamed the age of the glue and/or the nighttime temperature in the shop (about 45-50 dF). Any similarities there to your situation?

This qualifies you for canonization by the Church of the Random Variable. Another 20 bucks gets you sainthood. :-)     mahalo,     jo4hn
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.