WWII Blade Part III

I finally bought a solid substance insert. Yes after all the discussion about making my own I bought one. Time issue. I'm satisfied with the flatness of the insert and have it installed in the table saw. I ran a couple test cuts and am still seeing teeth marks on the wood. In a lot of places it's as smooth as glass except for the teeth marks. I remember reading several weeks back about someone having a WWII that had a wobble in the blade, the blade itself wasn't flat. Is there an easy way for me to test the blade I have? Setting it on a flat surface and see if it rocks comes to mind, is this a valid test?
For those that own the WWII, are you seeing teeth marks at ALL in your cuts? Maybe I'm just too particular? The cut is very good, but if the rest of you are getting cuts without teeth marks, that's what I'm after.
Thomas
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Thomas, providing your saw is properly set up, try loosening the arbor nut and rotate the blade 180 degrees on the arbor and retighten the nut. No blade or arbor is perfect. You may be witnessing two extreme situations coupled together. Sometimes rotating the blade 180 degrees will cancel the problem out.
90% of the time I see no tooth marks with either of my WWII blades. The other 10% is wood that is not perfectly flat or straight or my feeding method.

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Here's something else that I've noticed about the WWII. Seems to me that I have to force the wood through the blade. I know enough to not go faster than the blade will cut, but it still feels like I'm forcing the wood through compared with other blades which are rip and combination blades. That's regardless of thickness or species of wood.
Leon wrote:

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That does not seem normal unless you are comparing to a thin kerf blade. You may want to call Forrest on this one and see what they say.
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That would be me with the wobble! ;-) I checked *one* tooth with a dial guage at the front and back of the table and it was out. I have other blades that were right on. My replacement WWII is perfect, no runout. If you dont have a dial guage, here is a simple test;
Take a small piece of dowel or a "chopstick" and clamp it good and tight to the miter guage so that it *just* touches a tooth edge. Rotate the blade buy hand (with saw unplugged) to see if the teeth hit evenly. If some touch and others don't, mark one that does touch and repeat the test after sliding the miter guage to the back of the blade. Repeat both tests with the blade rotated 180 on the arbour. If all the tests come out the same (with the marked tooth still hitting the stick) the blade is out. If there is ANY variance in the test, then the arbour is not true, or is not lined up properly with the miter slot.
Dave.
Thomas Mitchell wrote:

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