WWII!

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I always thought the guys talking about their great WWIIs were suffering from "expensive tool" syndrome; an expensive tool has to be better than a cheap tool. I thought my Freud blades were fine.
But when Amazon had it on sale for $60 a few months ago I had to buy one. Finally got around to trying it today. I am gluing 2 end grains together, so I needed them perfect. I was planning on making a light pass with a router afterwards, just to make them perfectly smooth.
Well, it isn't necessary. These cuts are so perfect they are somewhat shiny.
How long does it stay this good?
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Depends on how many cheap 2 by 4's ya plan on cutting........;-)
I've had mine for 3 years with "fair" amount of use and no signs of needing sharpening yet. It will still rip 12/4 hard maple and not leave any burn marks. Keep it clean and wax it occasionally.
Bob S.

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Are they *that* good? Is the Thin-kerf version equally good? I'm thinking of getting one for my saw - its a 1 3/4 hp hybrid delta and I was thinking that a WWII thin-kerf blade might be better than the regular kerf freud I've been using (when it comes to thick or very hard wood).
BobS wrote:

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Get the regular kerf. A good regular kerf blade is better than a medium quality thin kerf.
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Yes, and so is my Ridge Carbide blade. You don't need the thin kerf with that power. My Delta 1.5 hp goes through thick oak rather easily.
It is not always easy to justify the added expense, but it sure does pay. When you buy a good bottle of liquor, it looks the same, side by side, as the cheap stuff, but when you take a sip, you can certainly tell.
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Frank,
If you plan on cutting a lot of hardwood stock that exceeds 8/4, with that 1 3/4hp motor then you would probably be best served with the thin kerf blade and use a 4" stabilizer with it. Otherwise - go with the 1/8" kerf blade.
When I had a Delta CS (1 1/2hp), I had the thin-kerf WWII and it worked great but cutting thick hard maple was a challenge. I upgraded to a cabinet saw with a 3hp motor and sold the thin-kerf blade and went with the 1/8" kerf blade. I have ripped 7' lengths of 12/4 hard maple when I was making some French doors for my niece's renovation project. No burn marks. Try that with a lesser quality blade. Yes, you do need well tuned tablesaw but it's the blade that makes all the difference.
Bob S.
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Wax it? To prevent rust maybe?
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yes...

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HUH, LOL, I'll give that a try. And I am glad to hear that the wax was not used to cut down on friction. ;~)
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Well, while many get good results with other brands the WWII keeps delivering good results. I keep 2 on hand so I am never with out one when the other is being sharpened.
PLEASE return to Forrest to have it resharpened and or tuned up when that time comes. I learned the hard way that my local service with computer controlled sharpening machines simply don't come close to getting it right.
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I'm betting Circle Saw?
--
"New Wave" Dave In Houston



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MVP Sharpeners on the west belt.
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So that's where they moved! I've been looking for MVP since they left their South Post Oak location; had a phone number on a scrap of paper floating around in my truck console for two or three years but it was a no-no when I finally got around to trying it. That's really good news since I'm right at Beltway 8 and 290.
--
"New Wave" Dave In Houston



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They moved there about 7-10 years ago. They are/were almost directly across the West beltway from Harwood Products. IIRC they have moved again to
MVP Sharpeners 17535 Huffmeister Rd Cypress, TX (281) 373-0646
Keep in mind that when they moved they were basically out of the tool business except for blades and sharpening.
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Thank yew, kind sir. Sharpening is all I ever used them for anyway. I recently used Woodcraft to do two sets of joiner knives but, of course I was in the day after pickup which meant a week went by before next pickup and then another week turn-around. Sigh.
--
"New Wave" Dave In Houston



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You might want to consider Forrest for the resharpening service. My history with MVP has been good. I started buying from them in 1988. The father was still running the company and the son went around selling sharpening services to the locals. I bought my first good blade from them and used them as my sharpening service up until about 2004. I let them give it a try on my Forrest WWII with the guarantee that it would be as good as new. It was not and was far from it. It did cut faster but the cut was rough. 3 weeks later I returned it to Forrest and got it back literally as good as new. MVP does not straighten blades. I don't doubt that MVP can still do a good sharpening job but as time goes by blades do not remain true gor what ever reason. Forrest can reflatten the blade and that had as much to do with a good smooth cut as a sharp blade. If I did not resharpen my jointer and planer knives myself I would let MVP do the work.
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"Leon" wrote in message

right.
I'm on the verge of buying a third one. Suddenly, I've got two that need to be sharpened and I don't want to be without.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 8/29/06
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LOL, I am almost in that same boat. I have been setting on one that has needed to be sharpened for a year now.
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The first time I pushed some purpleheart through the WWII I knew it was worth the money I paid for it.
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wrote:

Sounds like my jointer and planer blades. I've got a set of each that I've needed to get sharpened sitting on the "to the house" cabinet surface for about that long. I've got to get them sharpened soon, the ones in the jointer and planer now are getting close to needing sharpening. Last goober that sharpened them really made a mess of the job; I need a better sharpening house in Tucson than Precision Tool.
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
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