Wow, Popular Magazined advises dangerous procedures

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Wrong again Leon. You either misunderstand or are simply a contrary "me too" type of dummy.
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You said,
I would assume that with a piece that's 4' long, you'd push from a safe distance until you have enough wood on the outfeed to be able to shift your grip and pull from there.
I did not clearly read what you had written. You indicated that you would push the stock until enough wood was on the out feed surface and then shift your grip and pull from there.
I replied Yes indicating that this would be a safe procedure visualizing you switching to the out feed side of the jointer when the stock had begun to pass to that side. Charlie pointed out that you would still push from both sides regardless of which end of the jointer you were working over. I neglected to pick up on the key words you mentioned that were incorrect. You indicated that when switching hand locations to the out feed side that you would then pull, that is incorrect. You would continue to push the stock on the out feed side.
I indicated Right again to Charlie because Charlie is most often right and he corrected my misunderstanding of what you had said.
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"Leon" wrote

Ever notice that some long, wide boards will simpy not stay moving straight over the cutter when all available hands are busy on the outfeed side?
My only problem with the method being commented upon is that, on long boards, and particularly those that approach the maximum width capacity of the jointer, you often need three hands, two pushing on the outfeed table, and one on the infeed side to guide the stock past the blades.
But, there's hope for the future!
It's been my contention for some time now that evolution will eventually give the wooddorker three hands and two more eyes on the back of his head so no one can sneak up and scare shit out of him whilst attempting to accomplish these often awkward tasks in the shop.
That said, all bets are off if you have an aircraft carrier flight deck jointer, like B A R R Y ' S DJ-20! ;)
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Leon wrote:

I'm the OP on this part of the thread, but not the OP of the entire thread.

Yes, that's what I meant.

That is also what I was thinking.

Here's where I'm losing both you and Charlie.

OOOhhhhh....Ok. Place hands on the wood, bearing down a bit, and pushing the stock that is on the outfeed, rather than pulling the already jointed end. Is that right?

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Yes, you push the board all the way through the cycle. First from the in feed end at the beginning of the pass and then as the stock goes over the out feed end you move your hands to the out feed end and continue to push. You do not want to push down hard, as you indicated bearing down a bit, if you push down too hard and the board is warped you will end up removing stock that does not need to be removed.
This is one machine that tends to be an acquired touch to get consistently good results.
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Leon wrote:

Got it now. Finances and especially space dictate that I won't be getting a jointer any time soon, but if and when I do, I'll certainly keep in mind that it's a tool that has a bit of learning curve.
Every tool I own does have one of course. This sounds like it has a lot more experimenting than most.
Thanks Leon. And Charlie.
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Keep in mind that I an not a big fan of the Jointer. It is the least used machine in my shop although it's size is a lot of the problem. You can flatten a board in a planer with the right sled/jig and you can very easily straighten a board with the TS with the right jig/sled. IMHO the jointer is not essential.
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Charlie Self wrote:

From two feet away, Charlie.
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Jointing well, both edge and face, is a learned art. The machine looks so bulky and basic but the slightest differences in technique make a huge difference. You want to get some down pressure on the outfeed side shortly after the material passess onto that side. For face joint outfeed is the reference surface that controls the plane of the cut if things are working correctly. In edge jointing, it and the fence are equally important.
Everyone develops their own technique and the length and heft of the material makes a difference too.
Yes, pulling can kind of be effective but the real key is consistency in pressure and speed across the entire span of the cut.
If you switch from a push to a pull at the cost of loosing consistency you will be able to find the wave (or worse) in the face surface.
The strangest thing for me is if you push too hard down into the table you will taper the board, even on a perfectly configured machine. A smooth fine touch is really needed for excellent jointing. Sharp blades, a feel for the cut and a few hundred cuts under your belt to find your chi.

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SonomaProducts.com wrote:

Thanks. I'm getting an idea on how this works now. It may be a tool I use in the future, and knowing that it requires more of a "feel" for it than other tools is valuable.
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Good analysis! The machine for sure requires for you to learn the feel and touch so keep in mind that practice makes perfect and you get better with it over time.
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Tanus wrote:

That's exactly what I'm talking about for bare handed or gloved face jointing. My "short limit" is ~24". That allows my hand to be 12" from the infeed side, and 6" from the outfeed. Shorter than that, and I use pads.
Remember, the whole reason for skipping the pads is because certain wood is more difficult to move with the pads. Shorter and thinner boards are easier to begin with.
I have "danger zones" taped, painted, or marked, on all of my flesh eaters and the sleds and jigs I use with them. For example, my jointer has red tape on the top of the fence. If my hands will go into the red area, I rethink the cut.
When edge jointing, I never, ever, use blocks or sticks. After ~ 8" of stock has been cut, my right hand "pulls" the stock along the fence, and my left is on the table, acting like a featherboard. The entire cut is referenced to the outfeed table and fence for great accuracy, and my hands apply no pressure that would send them towards danger in case of unwanted adventure.
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... and my hands apply no pressure that would send them towards

Bingo; them's the magic words. After one gets used to it, it's as natual as writing with a pencil or riding a bike.
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wrote:

So now you know that's a magazine that's not worth reading. Neither the writer nor the editor ought to be working there.
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On Fri, 18 Jan 2008 23:53:01 +0000, Andy Dingley

Anyone who has:
A.) Seen Glen's work...
-- or --
B.) Read any of the hundreds of other things he's written, including his books...
Would know that even if you don't agree with everything he says, the man has lots to offer.
The blog post is HIS singular opinion.
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Agreed, every one does something wrong. ;~)
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On Fri, 18 Jan 2008 21:39:15 -0600, "Leon"

It happens!
Personally, I'd be afraid to post what he did. It works for him, but he is completely aware and comfortable with the physics of the operation.
Unfortunately, I just know somebody will get a glove stuck, and his personal injury lawyer will be contacting Mr. Huey and the magazine.
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On Sat, 19 Jan 2008 00:21:56 GMT, "Bonehenge (B A R R Y)"

So leave him in the workshop, but don't let him write for a mass audience.
Printing that sort of advice in a magazine is going to cause other people, of less "skill" than this guy, to lose fingers.
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On Sat, 19 Jan 2008 11:43:33 +0000, Andy Dingley

I hear ya'.
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Said one bloated, bottom feeding idiot:

More like, we know who's a closed minded fool you mean.
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