Wow, Popular Magazined advises dangerous procedures

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I just read an article by Glen D Huey of Popular Woodworking and he advises not using push stick or pads when using ht jointer. He advises to use rubber coated gloves. While I partially subscribe to not using push stick and or pads when using the jointer to straighten the "edge" of a wide board, the photographs show him wearing rubber coated cloves while surfacing the face of a board on the jointer. He claims it gives him more feel for knowing when the knives are hitting high spots. Personally I use my ears and push pads. What feel is he going to have after the board he is surfacing, shatters?
http://blogs.popularwoodworking.com/editorsblog/PermaLink%2Cguid%2C21d7d1a5-0cc8-491f-a0d6-8b3903ef9479.aspx
IMHO this is just plain stupid. I do not care who you are and what safety measures you take, the odds are against you and sooner or later you can or will have an accident. While he does warn of certain dangerous practices while wearing gloves, those concerns are a moot point if you are using a push pad.
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Leon said:

Wow. I concur. Not that it matters... Convenience is hardly a consideration in lieu of the possible loss of digits/flesh.
Greg G.
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"Leon" wrote

safety
One of my supplier's reps has the first joints of three fingers on one hand basically nonexistent from just such an accident on a jointer (aptly named in this unfortunate instance).
The "thickness" of the work piece, regardless of how thick when 'face jointing', is something I personally NEVER rely upon to protect me from the jointer blades. That specific task on the jointer is one of the reason why I own two, count'em - 2, Grrrippers ... and use them.
PW, although having some good stuff between its pages, is just another example of not believing/taking at face value what you read, see, or hear in this, the age of the idiocracy.
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Swingman said:

IIRC, Sam Maloof had a similar accident with a jointer that resulted in the loss of several fingertips to the joint. Although watching him work, would have guessed the accident occurred at the bandsaw.
Greg G.
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Doesn't Maloof freehand on the bandsaw? That's an operation that makes me shudder just thinking about it. I guess it comes down to what's comfortable for one, may/will not be comfortable for all.
Jc
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It's very hard to screw up on a bandsaw in a way that will take your fingers off. I guess Maloof can afford to crimp a blade now and then.
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True, if all you have is a toy bandsaw. You don't know your stump from a hole in the ground, dingle-berry.
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wrote:

What;'s "freehanding" ? Wiggling a line in plywood is one thing, but Maloof is doing it in three dimensions. That means you've little support under the workpiece, and support you do have is some distance (i.e. a lever arm) away from the blade. Have the blade catch, and the work slams downwards, bending a crimp into the blade.
I do this, but I can't say I enjoy it. I also lose blades by doing it. The trick is to have a _big_ bandsaw, which just never catches.
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I *thought* a couple folks misunderstood what i meant by freehanding. You, of course, nailed it.
jc
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I never nail anything. Bamboo pegs, if I must 8-)
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If humans were meant to face joint, they wouldn't have evolved the capacity to make thickness planers...
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Care to support that comment, keeping in mind 1 face of the board should be flattened before the other is introduced to the thickness planer?
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On Thu, 17 Jan 2008 22:35:08 -0600, "Leon"

Just throw 'em straight into the thicknesser. Anythign too warped to come out was too warped to be much use anyway 8-)
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Andy Dingley wrote:

If it's cupped then you can flatten it in the thickness planer if you know what you're about, but if it's bowed or twisted going into the thicknesser it will still be bowed or twisted coming out of the thicknesser. For some purposes this is acceptable, for others it isn't.
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Jeff wrote:

At this point, I'm going to step away from this thread, pour a drink, and observe. <G>
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"Jeff" wrote

... strictly for the benefit of those unsure of the difference between the machines/operations. :)
Two machines/operations with very different purposes: one used to flatten an edge or face (jointer); the other to mill opposite surfaces parallel (planer).
A jointer won't necessarily mill opposite faces/edges parallel; and a planer won't necessarily mill stock flat.
Both machines, used in conjunction, in a methodical manner, and in the proper order (along with other tools like table saws/hand planes) will allow a woodworker to mill straight, flat, and dimensioned, project stock from rough lumber.
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For flat parallel sides, I go from rough cut to planer, to jointer (edge) to table saw (opposite edge). Feel free to expound the virtues of face jointing. I've never had a need. Unless we're dealing with conceptual differences. I have jointed right angles on stock cut for legs, then finished it to size on the jointer. A piece like that would have finished at 1-1/2 x 1-1/2. I suppose technically I face jointed although it felt like I jointed two edges.
Jeff
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"Jeff" wrote in message

the
flatten an

planer
allow
Never mind <sigh> ... just go buy us both lottery tickets while your luck's still holding.
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Count me in too, ROTFLMAO

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Heh. Is it luck or the fact that I buy wood on a per project basis?
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