WOW...Let's try this again...Shoud I rewire for 220?


I had no idea I would start a flame war!! Thanks for all the input, though.
Here's the rest of the details to address the rest of the issues raised in the responses:
1. When I said "true" 1 HP, I meant "continuously developed." In other words, it isn't one of those marketing jobs like my shop vac which has 6.25 Peak HP!! (Horse hockey...my shop vac wouldn't know 6 and a quarter horses if they all crapped down it's hose at the same time.) 2. Wired for 110 the jointer is rated for 12.5 amps. 3. It has a double-pole switch, so no changes are necessary to run 220v. 4. My 220 drop comes straight out of my main panel...no subpanels.
So I guess the bottom line is: Will the motor actually run any better? I've been told by some local guys I trust that the motor may not develop any more HP on 220, but it won't bog as easily either on the tough stuff. Will it run cooler, and will wiring it for 220 provide an extra measure of safety against burning-out the motor?
Thanks again for all your assistance!! (And you guys play nicely!!)
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Mark;
Double the voltage means half the current. Thus, lower power losses to heat in the circuit between the panel and the motor. Also, less voltage drop between the panel and the motor. So the motor should have less tendency to bog down when you put a heavy load on it. This is when the higher voltage will make a difference.
--Steve
Mark Cooper wrote:

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Steve wrote: ...

Well done... :)
I'd only add that unless you do very heavy surfacing or rabbeting operations, the load you're likely to impose w/ a jointer is minimal if the knives are kept well sharpened. If otoh you hear it bog occasionally, it's a good clue that the higher voltage will help w/ lower temperature rise, but still unless you're using the jointer nearly continuously in a production environment the likelihood of noticeable harm is miniscule.
As someone else notes, in general if the shop is presently wired w/ 14ga for 15A you <might> actually observe a difference under heavy load. Personally, I'd run 12ga/220V service just on general principles to have it and switch over everything I had/could, but that's simply personal preference/choice for myself as much as anything--although my tablesaw and planer are 220V only, so it was no more real effort/expense to run enough to supply the whole shop...
IMO, YMMV, $0.02, etc..... :)
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You didn't say what other tools you have or will be buying. If you plan to buy a cabinet saw or any tools with 2HP or greater motors, I would go ahead and run 240V circuits in the shop. If you are running new circuits, go ahead and run the 240. If not, just stick with the 120V.
I currently have a jointer, planer, bandsaw, contractors saw, drill press, dedicated mortiser and router table in my shop. The largest motor is 1.5 HP and all are run from 120V. At this point I see no reason for me to change to 240V. However, If I decide to upgrade my contractors saw to a cabinet saw (3 to 5 HP) I will run the 240 and then consider selectively converting the other tools to 240.
HTH,
--
Al Reid



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I came into this thread a little late...so I missed allot of posts....
But if this is a new shop the OP is wiring...
I would have at least 3 220 v circuits installed.. or prewired
My little 24 x 24 shop has one 220 circuit dedicated to heat and air conditioning.. .a second one solely for my Tablesaw and a 3rd for the DC..
Just my opinion...
Bob Griffiths
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Hmmmm...
Table saw - 220 jointer - 220 bandsaw - 220 Dust Coll. - 220 Table saw II - 220
I assume you will buy other tools someday.
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Hell Mark - just about every post generates a flame war around here these days. Must be one long PMS cycle for the group.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
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What gauge wire supplies the motor now? How long is the run from the main? If you have a fairly long run and it's #14 wire, you will likely see some improvement with #12 and 220V.
Max
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If it's a long run with #14 wire, he'll see improvement with #12 at 120V.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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Max
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You are most likely to see a performance difference when the motor's current draw is near the limit of the circuit you connect it to. Your 1 HP motor draws 12 amps at 120v, which is fairly close to the capacity of a 15-amp circuit. Remember that an induction motor will draw about twice as much current for the first couple seconds as it starts to spin up to speed. If you connect it to a 15-amp circuit thru an extension cord (NOT recommended), or if the run from the outlet to the breaker box is long, you'll notice it taking longer to come up to speed, and it may trip the breaker.
I have a Craftsman TS with a 1.5HP motor. When I connect it to the 20-amp curcuit with a 25-ft 10AWG extension cord it starts fine. Just once, I connected it to a 15-amp circuit instead, and the first time it started up pretty slow, and the second time I started it, it kicked the breaker. I don't do that any more.
Extension cords are generally not recommended for these tools, because the extra copper between the wall and the motor will reduce the voltage to the motor, and it will run hotter. If you have to use one, make it the heaviest one you can find, and keep it as short as possible. For your 12-amp motor, I wouldn't use anything less than 12AWG, and no more than 25 feet. My 10AWG cord was designed for use with an RV, and it's supposed to be rated at 25 amps.
--Steve
Mark Cooper wrote:

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