Wow, is this safe?

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On 10/23/2015 10:36 AM, dpb wrote:

That's what I was looking for when I found the video I asked about. I could imagine a jointer being convenient for repeated rabbets.
I'm surprised that the tapering method seems to be a known, semi-standard technique. That said, I doubt I'll be trying it.
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On 10/23/2015 3:35 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:

I taper a lot of things via the jointer, albeit generally not in that manner nor for things with that much taper; as said, I'd cut that to near a line w/ the bandsaw and then just clean it up w/ the jointer (or a hand plane depending on my mood and the particular piece :) ).
Mostly what I do is to start w/ a line and simply work to the line by starting in the middle and repeat...but as said, it'd be rare indeed to choose to take that much off on that steep an angle via the jointer alone...
For the doubters on the BS, there's an article in August FWW by Pekovich of very nice dresser where he tapered the legs their length. One illustration shows the taper cut in progress; you can see there'll be very little handwork left when he's done...
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On 10/22/2015 11:01 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Really, you going to tape them together? Clamp them together??? I don't think so. Repeatable. So is my tablesaw.
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Jeff

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On 10/22/2015 4:51 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

so I am not sure it assures repeatability more so than a tablesaw. With the tablesaw, when you are done you can take a swipe on the jointer. It's fully supported all the way through. I truly dislike Glen's methods. Taking a point (the first few passes on two points) and moving it to a spinning blade is asking for trouble. We're not talking a tablesaw.
I believe that it might actually push back the point and slap the front down to the table. But those are my beliefs. I just posted something from the table book in the binaries. It show's another Glen moment.
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wrote:

I've done similar in the past with no issues.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote in

I disagree; search for my post several years ago about "The Ultimate Taper Sled".

No planing needed with a good table saw blade either.

But trivially easy to accomplish with a properly-designed taper sled for the table saw. Much safer, too.
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On 10/22/2015 10:19 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

I can't stand Glen Huey. He always shows the most unsafe methods of working.
A jointer can be used to tape legs. Would I do it the way he did? Absolutely now. I would put the piece up on the outfeed in the same spot each time and work from there. It self tapers. His way is dangerous.
I can show you some pics of a book that I have that he does some unbelievable stupid methods of work.
He should not be teaching others how to do things.
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On Thu, 22 Oct 2015 10:19:17 -0400

it looks strange with those sticks
if it feels unsafe then it probably is i guess he is comfortable doing it that way the process seems slow though did he go slower for the camera
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On 10/22/2015 9:19 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

Not terribly _un_safe, no, altho I'd not do that significant a taper wholly with the jointer and certainly not in as large a bite (particularly in hardwood which would likely be the target for most furniture legs).
As another said, I'd use the "start in the middle on the outfeed table" technique for small tapers; as another said that much of a taper would (should imo) be cut on the bandsaw and cleaned up either as that poster said w/ handplane or I often do use one or two quick _very_ light passes over the jointer instead...
Suit yourself on the style of pushstick; I've no real preference there, but don't see any drastic problem with the traditional (probably 'cuz that's what was raised with, if nothing else..)
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On 10/22/2015 9:19 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

Absolutely safe, if a bit tricky and fussy on setup.
Back in December, at the request of a client, I put tapered legs on a built-in extension of a kitchen peninsula.
The leg size she wanted was simply too big to cut on a 10" table saw with tapering jig. I used the exact same method in your video above to do the leg tapers on the jointer:
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopJigsFixturesMethods?noredirect=1#6208586244951950434
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What is the problem. He is a pro or semi-pro and stated over and over NOT to do this without the guard. He was showing the cutter do its thing.
Martin
On 10/22/2015 9:19 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

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On 10/22/2015 10:11 PM, Martin Eastburn wrote:

He's a pro, only in that someone paid him to write. He might have nice stuff, I don't know. But I always found his methods to be wreckless for the in-experienced, or even the avid woodworker.
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You mean NORM in his early years ? Now that was nothing to behold!
He has cleaned up his act after having problems.
Using a table saw can be and often is just as tricky and dangerous.
A high speed blade with hook teeth ? and someone feeds stock into it.
Cutting joints on a table saw can be nasty.
Martin
On 10/22/2015 9:24 PM, woodchucker wrote:

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On 10/22/2015 11:02 PM, Martin Eastburn wrote:

Norm was never (that I saw) dangerous. Glen, is usually dangerous (from what I have seen).
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On 10/22/2015 9:19 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

The big question, why in the world do it on a jointer. It would be so much easier and so much faster to do on a table saw.
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On 10/23/2015 9:02 AM, Leon wrote:

I'd disagree w/ a typical small taper on a TS..the bandsaw, yes; TS, "not so much". Not that it can't be but it's a lot more trouble as you _must_ have a tapering sled for the TS whereas it's simply a freehand operation on the BS.
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On 10/23/2015 9:26 AM, dpb wrote:

This is true but I then, most likely, you have to clean that cut up. And FWIW once you have the tapering sled it is not much different than ripping a board.
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On 10/23/2015 9:30 AM, Leon wrote:

Well, you'll have to cleanup the TS cut, too, in all likelihood... :) And, it's only a lick or two with a good plane.
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That depends on the construction of the taper sled. If you cut your tapers top-to-bottom, with the blade entering the side of the leg and exiting from the end, some blade deflection at the beginning of the cut is almost inevitable, leaving cuts that need some cleanup. That's one of the main reasons I designed and built what I called "TUTS - The Ultimate Taper Sled" (you may remember my post about that several years ago). That sled cuts tapers from the bottom up, with the blade entering the end of the leg and exiting from the side. There's no detectable blade deflection, and what little cleanup needs to be done can be accomplished in under a minute with a card scraper.
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On 10/24/2015 2:17 PM, Doug Miller wrote:

I started going from the bottom up, when I could not figure out why the taper was at an angle at the top. I don't remember if it was the rec or alt binaries where someone recommended bottom up.
My sled was capable either way. To me it seemed I was cutting against the grain with this method, but the cuts were now square. And it has not been a problem.
So I'll second your recommendation of cut from the bottom up. It solved my problem.
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Jeff

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