Would you make the cut?

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Ok, at our local HS, we have an open woodshop class - tho no instruction is ever given unless asked for.
I need to rip some boards down to 2" and others to 3". Each set of boards will vary in length from 24 - 60" inches.
The school shop has an old Delta TS. Last week and and other student checked the splitter. The thing was NOT centered on the blade and was leaning intowards the fence. We somehow got it aligned by working it up and down. But I still didn't trust it that night.
I was wondering if there was a good way I could safely rip my boards on this saw if the splitter is still "out of whack".
We do have some hold downs and featherboards. I could see fashioning a hold down that would keep the boards down on the table. Then pushing (with push sticks) the stock thru the cut.
Also, I could also see just ripping on the bandsaw as well.
Anyother good ideas? I searched my books and without a doubt a splitter is the way to go and would be if the machine is mine but I'm looking for an equally safe alternative.
MJ Wallace
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snipped-for-privacy@onebox.com wrote:

Are you a student in this class I gather?
If so, I would suggest it's time to ask for some help--first to get the machine set up properly and second to get some (hopefully) competent instruction/demonstration on the use of the saw itself.
2" is really not that bad a width for ripping w/ a push stick and 5' or less is short enough that it can be handled reasonably well although an outfeed support would be useful.
I would <not> use the saw with the splitter until the splitter is set properly and is not loose where it could be moved manually. I'd rather rip w/o it than in that condition.
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Personally, I'd use the bandsaw unless I could get reliable help in setting up the splitter correctly.
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Andy wrote:

Personally, I'd take the splitter off--I've never found need for one for anything other than really sorry stuff like wet construction lumber that moves like crazy...
I just didn't want to make that particular recommendation to what appeared to be a shop student...
It sounds like a very poorly run shop/program, however. :(
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Duane Bozarth wrote:

The task is even easier with the blade set slightly taller than the work, and swapping the push sticks for push BLOCKS, jointer style.
Yes, the blade will chew up the bottom of the push block, but that's why they're cheap. Blocks are even cheaper when you make them in the shop, with mouse pads glued to the bottom.
While I prefer a splitter to be in place, I've used this method very comfortably without a splitter many times. The thinnest I've ripped this way was 1/8" wide (with a zero clearance insert).
Barry
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On Wed, 12 Oct 2005 11:28:25 +0000, B a r r y wrote:

I don't know table saws. This is just curiosity: Do you apply two strips of neoprene, either side of the blade path? Would the blade snatch at neoprene if one wide piece were used?
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Australopithecus scobis wrote:

I start with a solid strip, which is soon slit all over the place. There is no "snatching" or other resistance to the blade. The blade chews at the bottom of the grip. When the grip wears off, sand or scrape the remnants off and attach a new grip with contact cement.
See: <http://www.bburke.com/wood/jigsandtools.html
I don't even bother to add the rear "hook" any more, the rubber does a fine job providing traction. My latest batch of shop made blocks are about the 3"x6" on the bottom, about 1/3 the length of the one in the photo, with similar handles. I rout a quick dado in the base, as Murphy specifies that nails or screws would definitely find the blade.
You could also buy commercially available G-RRIPPERs, or use standard "jointer" style push blocks rather than making them.
Using the blocks allows the operator to safely keep pressure on the work to hold it against the fence. One block should always be against the work. Whenever possible, I still use an MJ or shop-made splitter, which are low enough to allow blocks to pass over. When ripping very thin strips, I'll often stand to the side of the saw, jointer-style.
Work safe!
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A tablesaw blade rips through neoprene foam pretty easily. You would hardly notice it.
-j
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My splitter is adjusted to lean closer to the fence. Sometimes it is a little tight and I have trouble getting the wood started but I NEVER have a kick back and seldom have blade marks on the cut. max

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First remove the insert and make sure that the splitter is properly attached to the saw and tightened down. Other than that, splitters have been known to get bent out of alignment and it should not be a big thing to bend/shape/push it back to where it properly belongs.Generally speaking, if you can accomplish the cut with the splitter in place and with normal pressure, and it is not loose, it is more than likely performing its function.
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In 20+ years of woodwerkin, I can't remember a cut I've ever made using a splitter. I would think no splitter would be safer than one that's not aligned right.
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If not, he should get one or fix his.
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Then he should not make the cut. Period. There is no safe way if you KNOW the fence or splitter is out of whack. You fix it, remove it, or go elsewhere.
My tablesaw kicks back every time I use it. Should I get a face guard? How about a chest protector?
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"Edwin Pawlowski" wrote in message

The part of your body you protect first depends solely upon how tall you are.
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Mine did occasionally (it shot a piece of wood through the wall, onto a couch 8 feet on the other side of the wall) until I got a microsplitter (or whatever they call it) Haven't had a kickback since.
Once in a while the wood will pull the splitter out, but that probably means I would have had nasty kickback without the splitter.
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That is my point. The op is wondering how to best make a cut on a saw that is way out of tune. Answer: You don't make the cut, you fix the saw first.
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wrote:

a cup.
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Maybe a modern day version of a suit of armor will do.
http://www.fist-inc.com/tg/Default.htm
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