World's hardest, easy geometry problem.

Some of you have, no doubt, seen this little nugget. (NO cheating with AutoCAD, or Google.)
http://thinkzone.wlonk.com/MathFun/Triangle.htm
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You could hear a pin drop....
Especially at my house!
Robert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

LOL.... the silence was deafening....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I sent the link to my granddaughter, who is in 6th grade. And to her parents, high school teachers in math and in physics.
Waiting ...
--
Best regards
Han
email address is invalid
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

For the record, I did actually work on it for a while. I usually ignore these puzzle type things, but this one did catch my attention.
I got everything worked out except for the angles closest to x. It seems to me that they should be solved via simultaneous (sp?) equations, but I was unable to figure out what the equations should be. That's not exactly elementary geometry, though, is it?
Puckdropper
--
You can only do so much with caulk, cardboard, and duct tape.

To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

semesters of calculus and differential equations on the way to an engineering degree. I spent several hours poring over this puzzle and even drew it to scale on CAD. It was easy enough to measure the angle by CAD and it turned out to be just what I had guessed it should be. But the best I could do by following the rules was to reduce it to 3 equations with 3 unknowns. But I suspect my 3 equations are inbred because I wasn't able to solve them. I don't believe it can be solved by simple geometry alone.
DonkeyHody "There's a difference between doing things right and doing the right things."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I drew a few contruction(deduction?) lines as per instructions (fused into my memory) of the best math teacher ever (high school, The Netherlands), he taught to be intuitive. I did solve it with geometry, but in a long roundabout way. After I solved it, the obvious slapped me in the face. I saw 'it'. I did end up feeling pretty proud of myself, but admittedly after waaaaaay longer than I had first thought. WAAAAY longer. I should have seen 'it' immediately. I didn't. Must be old age. That math teacher loved his job and subjects. I had a salty dog, ex sailor, as a geography teacher in the same school. When he talked about foreign lands, he had us all in the palm of his hand. We could smell the products from far away places as he described them. Annnnd, (stupid us, we didn't know ) he was teaching all the while. To this day I enjoy learning new stuff about foreign lands. OTOH, my biology teacher sucked canal water.
r
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Robatoy" wrote

Ahh yes! Miss Anthony, 8th grade English, the impression she made on the minds of us young lads, and the countless trips we made to worship her at her desk ... and to peek down the front of her blouse.
The mammaries linger to this day!
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 3/27/08
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Hence "Swingman"?
--
Best regards
Han
email address is invalid
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

She'd be a registered sex offender today.
Dave in Houston
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<snip>

My mathteacher was an elderly lady nicknamed koptelefoon, because of her wound-up braids. Geography teachers were just weird. Biology teacher was the greatest. I agree, slootwater can be really bad, but I did swim in both the Rhine and Friesian canals. I also did other things, but fishing was not my forte. Met my wife in '62 summercamp aboard this boat: http://www.lvbhb.nl/galerij/gudsekop.html
--
Best regards
Han
email address is invalid
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Han" wrote:
<snip>

My highschool math teacher was less than 5 ft tall and past 70 when she tried to teach me.
Had a 48-49 Packard that when she drove, could barely see over the steering wheel to drive.
Never did check to see if she ahd blockes attached to the pedeals so she could reach them.
Great teacher.

Had one who decided to check out one of her male students.
Suddenly, one day she was gone at noon.
Never really got the straight story, but then again, a small town in the MidWest in the early 50s.
Pretty racey stuff for the period.

Nice boat.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
.

That's funny. We had a physic teacher we call 'drollevanger' (turdcatcher) because he wore those pants that puff up at mid-calf height.

I went to sail camp the way kids go to regular camp every summer. Indeed, the Friesian lakes, and the water was clear in the early 1960's. The Rhine, however, which ran through my home town Alphen aan den Riin, was basically an open sewer. Much better now, but I knew enough back then not to swim in there. The diverted Rhine, which now flows through Rotterdam is down-stream from a lot of German industry...not so sure I'd swim in it either.

Got to love those flatbottoms, eh? That's not the kind of sailing we did. We sailed Rainbows: http://tinyurl.com/2gt98v
(While looking for a picture of a regenboog, I saw what people are paying for those these days...holy cow...)
r
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I grew up in Wageningen, and the Rijn wasn't too clean, but occasionally I'd swim there. Mostly if needed because the sailing boat didn't stay up. The Rijn at Wageningen wasn't too crowded with commercial traffic, but of course, we'd stay out of the way of the tankers.

Regenboog was an Olympic class from before WWII, I believe. Even when I was a kid, they were rare because of their cost. Mostly BM'ers, maybe Vrijheidjes (Freedom) and other even cheaper plywood boats. You know, the kind for which daysailer was an exhalted term. Of course, glass and plastic is the norm now. 30 years ago we got a present from people who were moving cross country, a Snark. It was fun on the Charles in Cambridge, MA.

--
Best regards
Han
email address is invalid
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Where is "CW?"
This is his type of thing...
--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Spot the similar triangles.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Andy Dingley wrote:

Except there aren't enough similar triangles initially to provide the total answer... :)
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.