Workshop Wall Panels, any suggestions?


Hi,
I am new to this forum (1st post). I recently purchased a home that has a 22' x 24' workshop. The workshop is great as is, but I would like to insulate it and put up some type of wall panels.
I would like wall panels that are suitable for workshop application and not harsh on the eyes for a reasonable (that means cheap :wink: ) price.
Does anyone have any suggestions on what type of wall panel to go with? What has been your experiences?
Thanks in advance.
Junior
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You may want to give more detail on what your dealing with for meaningful feedback.
You have an enviable problem that I would wade into it with a degree of pause and deliberation. Not sure what your background is, but if you plan on getting into woodworking, I would do a fair amount of planning and reading before rushing to finish it. Electrical, plumbing, HVAC, dust extration, tool placement, lighting - are just a few considerations. Several books and articles detail the ideal shop or at the very least give you a grocery list of things needing consideration. Read, read, read.
Walls? Pick something light in color. Nice to have some reflection. I've been in shops with tongue/groove dark wood and they feel like caves.
Good luck - I wish I had the same problem to deal with.
KB
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Well, I don't know about a suggestion, but my thought for my shop walls is a bottom row of drywall around the shop (so it's 4' high), then one row of slot-wall, then drywall on top. There will be a bit of a funky transition between the 3/4" slotwall and the drywall, and I'm not sure if it's generally acceptable to lay the drywall horizontally rather than vertically, but what the hell, it's my shop, right? :) The slotwall will be considerably more expensive than the drywall, at around $45/sheet up here in Canada. But I've got one piece of it already up on my wall, and it's mucho handier than pegboard, in my opinion.
Clint

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Clint wrote:

walls is a

of
transition
vertically,
here in

mucho
message
that
:wink:
I like the slotwall idea best, holds everything from small tools to moveable cabinets (with the proper cleats on the back) making your whole shop reconfigurable, and you WILL reconfigure your shop at some point to accomodate new toys, er... tools. With a little patience and perserverence, and if you live in or near a city, you can get the board cheap or free by watching local strip malls and store fronts for businesses that are folding or are for lease. The owners of these buildings frequently remove this stuff for the new tenant.
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That's where I got my one-piece from (as mentioned in the bottom of the posting). Business next door to our office was renovating, so I picked it up for the cost of my labour (which isn't much :)). But that's kind of a hit-and-miss approach.
Clint

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For inexpensive it's hard to beat quarter inch pegboard, painted white or prefinished white from the HD. Lets you hang stuff anywhere an dit's pretty tough. Only problem is that lately I've been unable to find decent hangers, only cheesy ones that don't stay in place well.
Slotboard is great if you can pick it up cheap somewhere. It's pretty pricey new.
Roger
Junior wrote:

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On Mon, 02 May 2005 17:32:14 -0400, Roger wrote:

A roll of heavy-gauge soft iron wire is cheap. I've been making my own hooks recently, custom bent to the tool. Coathanger wire works too. I hotglue the coathanger-wire hooks to the pegboard. They stay put, but can still be pried out. The hot glue works better than those little plastic clips for holding hooks in place.
Someone with brazing capability could take the soft iron to new heights of utility.
--
"Keep your ass behind you"
vladimir a t mad scientist com
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Hi Junior,
Nice size shop you got there!
I think that I would use the slot wall wherever I could. If that's too expensive, many woodworkers use 3/4 plywood screwed to joists and then paint it a light color for good reflectance. With plywood, you can hang anything you want anywhere you want it. You can also build off of it so that you can make dedicated "stations" around the shop for sharpening and the like. This is what I would like to do on my next shop "remodel".
Right now I have about 20 feet of pegboard over my workbench etc. I curse that stuff every time I reach for something since usually the hook will come down with it - and sometimes another tool or two. Stay away from it, but if you insist on it, at least get the heavy duty board & fasteners.
HTH
Lou

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I don't remember where I got them, but I have some clips that attach to the pegboard hooks so they can't come out. But the clip (2-part) can be separated and reused so the hook can be taken down if necessary. Solved my pegboard problems.
--
Homo sapiens is a goal, not a description

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Lou,
If your peg locations are fairly static, a dab of hot-melt glue will hold those pegs in place. It will probably tear a little bit but you can pull them out when you need to without much effort.
-Steve
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I have gotten good results using OSB (oriented strand board, 7/16" I think) as a more durable substitute for normal drywall. I used foam board underneath that and sealed the seams of the OSB with the "great stuff" foam spray, followed by trimming it level with the OSB surface after curing, then used the mesh drywall tape and finished the seams and surface as necessary like drywall. Then followed up with pva primer and satin finish of whatever color suits your taste.
The foam board insulation gives the highest r-value per inch thickness and the OSB doesn't puncture or dent as easily as drywall, yet is just slightly more in cost. My electrical are conduit on the surface of the OSB as is the air plumbing. Has worked well for me.
On Mon, 02 May 2005 17:57:32 +0000, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo-dot-com.no-spam.invalid (Junior) wrote:

Joe Brophy CountryTech Computer email: snipped-for-privacy@spiretech.com
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Joe Brophy wrote:

A caution here, in many jurisdictions it is a requirement that "foam board insulation" or similar must be covered with non-flamable material. I doubt the OSB over foam board would satisfy that requirement.
Ed
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I'm going to buck the trend here.
Sheetrock, painted white. Mark the stud locations on the floor, or use some other method to make them easy to find later.
You stated 2 criteria: inexpensive and attractive.... you will not find a cheaper surface than $8 a sheet. It will make you "feel" better hanging out in a finished space. IMNSHO plywood or OSB looks cobbled together at best.
There is alot of attention given to attaching things to walls. You can burry some 1-by material at the eye-level or so behind the sheetrock for a screwing surface.
I'm not a big fan of pegboard. I have some, but I think cabinets are a nicer solution. Defiinitely go with prefinished white.
-Steve

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I used 1/4 inch hardboard, the kind that's painted white. They make a plastic transition strip to insert between panels. Cheap. Quick. Easy. No painting.
I'd recommend attaching 2x material between studs with the wide side flush with the surface of the joists. Run this backing material all the way around your shop for hanging cabinets on.
Steve
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On Tue, 03 May 2005 08:14:02 -0400, Stephen M wrote:

I agree. Sheetrock painted white. Mark stud locations. And then install french cleats at 40 and 80 inches all around the shop. I've got a cleat system installed and made custom fixtures to hang clamps, cabinets, and large portable tools. It works great. and looks good too.
DGA
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Faced with the same job a couple of years ago, I chose T-8 siding. I used the 5/8" thick stuff, with the grooves vertical. I chose to not paint it or finish it, although some would like a white paint to better reflect light. I find it light enough with the mill finish.
Pro's: Looks better than plywood or OSB. Hang anything anywhere with screws. Removing screws leaves an almost invisible hole compared to smooth sanded plywood. Easy to hang. No taping or mud. Relatively easy to remove a panel for reworking utilities.
Con's: More expensive than plywood (not much) or drywall (a lot). Can give you splinters if you are careless. Off gassing may bother you for a few months (smelled great to me, but YMMV).
You can see glimpses of it below. -- ******** Bill Pounds http://www.billpounds.com
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