Workshop wall material


I'm debating on what material to use for the walls of my new workshop. I'm starting with insulation between studs - the only real requirement is that I have at least decent sound supression since it's in the basement under my daughter's room :-) I'm leaning towards using a stud supported mounting system for most of the stuff I'm hanging on the walls, so it's not crucial that I be able to drive a nail in anywhere and expect it to hold. I realize this is a pretty wide open question that's probably been covered before, so feel free to direct me to old threads/web sites.
Thanks in advance, Al
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I theorize that the sound suppression may only need to be in the ceiling.
My shop walls are peg board. I have many tools hanging on the hooks. It keeps the tools quite accessible and eliminates the need for cabinets that consume floor space.
I had the paint store mix up the brightest white they could, that helps too.
Don Dando

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I would think about a 2 layer system...Wallboard for the fire retardant layer and a T-111 for an outer layer to keep the dings in the wall from boards and tools to a minimum, if you want a single layer, use theater fire-retardant on the T-111 - follow the directions carefully - and it will pass code. My workshop is all T-111 lined and it was "primed" using the fire retardant and then painted in some areas and left "natural" in others. The natural areas need a re-coat of the fire retardant each year.
I use a cutting torch in the workshop (no it is not in the basement) and from time to time get too close to the wall. I have never had an open flame from the walls.

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The outermost wall covering should be a fire-resistant material such as fire-rated gypsum wallboard. This is a particular concern for a relatively high fire hazard area such as a woodworking shop located under living quarters. In some locales, building code may require it. If hanging things from shop walls is a consideration, the gypsum board can be underlayed with plywood or OSB, or external French cleats may be used. If minimum noise transmission to adjoining basement rooms is a concern, the wallboard may be suspended from the studs via metal acoustic channel or clips [DAGS]. Sealing ALL gaps with acoustic sealant and installing solid core doors, weather-stripped and sealed at the bottom with floor sweeps would be beneficial for maximum acoustic benefit. Ovehead clearance permitting, suspended ceilings can also significantly reduce noise transmission and retard fire spread to rooms above as well as providing access to overhead utilities. These acoustic treatments are similar to those employed for home theaters, band practice rooms, etc.
Fire detectors in the shop interconnected with alarms in the upstairs bedrooms would be recommended.

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Al wrote:

Fine Woodworking issue 167 has an article: "Soundproof a basement shop".
Should be able to get it at your local library.
Chris
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On Mon, 13 Feb 2006 08:58:37 -0600, Chris Friesen

Nail fibre egg cartons to the ceiling ...walls too, if you want to go gung ho.
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