Working with pine instead of hardwood?

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I'm gonna float around a while and check out some of the topics. Remind me where to post some pics . . . it's been a while! :-)
Jums
Many of the "old" regulars are gone, time, spam, and other assorted BS chased many people off. This place ain't what it used to be a few years ago! Greg
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with the Pine!)
Sitting back, waiting for the newbie's to say, What the hell they talking about? Greg
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On Tue, 14 Oct 2008 11:46:36 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@brazosriverband.com wrote:

All those responses and nobody answered your question???
The miter angle is 22.5 degrees independent of diameter.
Assuming the measured "diameter" is the distance from side to side across the center of an octagon, the length of the outside edge of the border is:
Length =tan(22.5) X "diameter" = 0.414 X "diameter"
Assuming the "diameter" is the distance from corner to corner across the center of an octagon, the length of an outside edge is:
Length = tan(22.5) X "diameter" = 0.383 X "diameter"
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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OOPS!!
The numbers are right, but the function should be "sin(22.5)".
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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Got it Tom and thanks! I've completed the top - now going to work on the pedestal base. Came out great!
Jim (aka Jummy)
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Not sure what your customer wants?? <G> Before you/they decide what, check out longleaf pine and mesquite. neither is cheap, longleaf around here, Tx Hill Country, starts at $5bft, select $9. Mesquite starts at $10. I like mesquite. That should give the SW flavor.
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LesT wrote:

You do NOT want SYP. It is hard and heavy but is also very resinous and rather coarse and unattractive. The resin is NP with cutting tools but it is a PITA with stationary sanders.
Fir - Douglas fir - isn't all that soft. In fact, it is pretty hard. I doubt it would give the look your customer wants though; for that, I'd suggest either ponderosa pine (a western wood) or eastern white pine. Maybe lodgepole pine (another western wood).

Some info on western woods... http://www.softwood.org/PPWeb/EN/PPine.htm . Sources for EWP. Both are reliable. http://www.hardwoodstore.com/lumber.html http://www.walllumber.com/soft.asp
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dadiOH
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Here's a link to a page of general characteristics of many species of woods including soft woods. Watch for wrap.
http://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/documnts/fplgtr/fplgtr113/ch01.pdf#search=%22wood%20characteristics%22
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Good one. Thanks for the link.
r
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Thanks for all the responses, they definitely gave me a solid foundation to begin on the project.
Les
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http://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/documnts/fplgtr/fplgtr113/ch01.pdf#search=%22wood%20characteristics%22 Nice resource. The full document, all chapters and frontal matter, is at http://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/documnts/fplgtr/fplgtr113/fplgtr113.pdf . The parent directory is FTP searchable, and contains the individual chapters.
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"LesT" wrote

"Vertical Grain Douglas Fir"
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www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 8/18/08
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There is such a thing as "furniture grade" SYP but it is very hard to come by. Most of the good stuff is shipped over to europe, where them boys are wild about our pine.
Here is at least one source that I'm aware of:
http://www.walllumber.com/soft.asp
Be aware that that SYP is the hardest soft wood you have ever used. It will splinter and chip unless you are using very sharp blades.
It will also leave the most pleasant odor ever left in shop after some sawing.
You will want "ONLY" kiln dried furniture grade SYP. Do not attempt to use any syp from an unknown source. SYP will punish you with some of the most amazing movement seen since Elvis.
Finishing can be a real challenge but I'll leave that to Robert and Barry and others who really know how to finish.
LesT wrote:

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On Tue, 07 Oct 2008 15:36:20 GMT, Pat Barber

I like working with clear white pine when I can get it. it is very warp resistant and resists splintering. No knots. Straight grain. Almost like Sitka spruce. Also quite light.
But it DOES ding easily and does not wear well. Makes good door frames (jambs) and windoe sash. But try to find the stuff anymore!! At ANY price (and it IS expensive when you can find it here in Ontario)
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