Workbench top: MDF, Countertop; 2x3 Maple; IKEA top; Old Exterior Door


"What do you have against two pieces of MDF tacked together?"
Nothing at all. But, I can purchase an old door for under ten bucks and have a 1 5/8 - 1 7/8 thick benchtop filled with MDF or solid wood all finished before the glue dries on a laminate that might well require two full sheets of MDF that will need to be covered top, bottom and edges (moisture issues) after that lay-up is dry.
Following that thread, it is apparent that workbenches come in all shapes and sizes and folks use a variety of materials to create the bench they need at the time.
The original post suggested a slab from IKEA at close to a hundred bucks after shipping, more with taxes. I simply joined in to offer an alternative. Not sure, by the way, why you would "pound on your benchtop" instead of hitting the workpiece, but splinter city is most unlikely and easily repairable.

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'Gooey', Let me 'stick my oar in' . . . if you don't mind . . . I DO have something against '. . . MDF tacked together'. . . I'm cheap & its too expensive - - it's outside the parameters of the 'K.I.S.S. Principle' - - - to susceptible to damage, etc.
I have three 'permanent' benches, and about 4 'temporary'. One {the first} is a 'shelf type' built by the original owner of our house. It is attached to two walls and the stairs in the basement. It is basically a '2x4' frame supported by '2x4' legs, and the recessed top is slats of scraps of 'tongue & groove' boards. Of course I haven't seen *them* in over 20 years - the first thing I did was cover the surface with 1/4in Hardboard. That surface was oiled to prevent paint/glue sticking. I don't really 'pound' on it . . . too resilient - stuff 'bounces', I installed a large, swiveling, machinists vice with an 'anvil plate'.
The second bench is a 'traditional' type carpenters/woodworkers/cabinetmakers bench. Got it fully assembled - 'last one close-out' at a local lumberyard - CHEAP - about $25.Although it has the usual side and end vices, and laminated top, I don't pound on this one either - it's my 'small assembly' and carving bench.
The last one is the 'beauty' and 'workhorse' of the bunch. About 7 ft long, 32 in wide, and 45in tall - it 'lives' in the shop. A '2x4' frame holds 2 DOORS I 'rescued' from the trash !! The top is a solid wood 'paneled'-type. The hollows of the panels were 'filled' with scraps of OSB, and a 'working surface' of 1/4in Lauan was tacked on, trimmed, and oiled. An interior, 'hollow' door serves as a lower 'shelf'. The lower 2x4 frame acts as an 'all-around lip'. Power tools are segregated {Sanders & Paper, Saws & Router, etc}into lidded clear plastic cartons and stored there.
Behind this bench are my 'temporaries' . . . several more 'rescued' interior doors. All I need to do is set up a pair of sawhorses {I several sets . . . 'custom made' and 'bought on close-out' foldable ones}and throw one across. VIOLA!! - 'Instant Custom Workbench'
Regards, Ron Magen Backyard Boatshop {PS - I use a good bit of MDF. My 'roll-around' router table is made of the 3/4 stuff, and my drawing patterns are from 1/8in and router patterns from 1/4in}

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