Workbench Project



As it turned out, I ended up with a 14" BS instead of a TS first. A mobile stand is supposed to arrive in the mail tomorrow! I've got too much unrelated work to do to put it together yet, but I can still plan. : ) It's still winter anyway...the glue would freeze before it would set...
Is there much of a downside to using a bandsaw (rather than TS) to rip the boards for this project? I would assume a 1/2" blade. I was thinking it might make it a bit more difficult to use braces to keep the boards flat as I clamp them together if I don't get "perfect" cuts. I may also need to rip off another 1/4" or so if the boards have rounded edges. On the other hand I was thinking that the band saw might be SAFER for ripping 7 foot "2 by 8" stock. I would use a homemade fence (clamps and a board).
I should probably start by trying to build a small table for my planer, or something, to help minimize the cost of my learning.
Also still thinking about putting some sort of boarder over the end grain on the end of the bench. If the top wasn't quite so thick I might consider tongue and groove. I don't think I have learned all of my options.
Best, Bill
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The down side would be cutting straight edges with a relatively short fence and producing an edge ready for glue up.
I would assume a 1/2" blade. I was thinking it might

For shop tables and what not the BS shoud work fine. Above I was refering more to making furniture where mistakes are less desirable.

Keep in mind that the width of wood changes with seasonal, temp, and humidity changes. Attaching to the endgrain will commonly result in less than desirable results long term. Take a look at "bread board ends" for a solution to this problem. Google will be your friend!

See above.
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Since you have a planer you can run your boards on edge after you re-saw.
Breadboard ends are common on benches. Use your router to make a tenon on the ends and attach breadboard with 1 fastener closer to the front of the bench. You can use 2 fasteners if you elongate the hole for 1 of them.
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Thank you for your replies! Very helpful.
Best, Bill
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Can this operation be performed if both edges have been cut with a band saw, or does it require one on them need to be jointed?
If not, I thought of passing a number of boards through at the same time, and then turning them all over and passing them through again. But maybe this is a silly idea? What do you think?
BTW, I've started my homework on breadboard sides.
The BS mobile base arrived in the mail as expected! A brought home a can of paint thinner (to get all that protective gunk off the saw) and a can of Johnson's Paste wax in case I find some free time! : )
Bill
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On Fri, 22 Jan 2010 22:01:05 -0500, the infamous "Bill"

Stryped, is that you?
-- We either make ourselves happy or miserable. The amount of work is the same. -Carlos Castaneda, mystic and author (1925-1998) -------
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