Workbench Lumber

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I'm about to attempt building "Bob and Dave's Good, Fast, and Cheap Bench"...
http://www.oldtoolsshop.com/z_pdf/shopImprov/BobAndDavesGoodFastAndCheapBench-ne.pdf
But I've run into a snag before I even begin. Much of the lumber that I had delivered to my home green... My 2x4x12s are green, and my 2x8s are green. I got a bunch of 2x4x8 that are STD-DRY Enough to make the bench top. My question is, can I use any of this lumber, can I still make mortise and tenon joins with green lumber? I didn't realize I needed to specify DRY when ordering construction grade lumber. Any help would be awesome!
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"Josh" wrote:

that
If you are in someplace like SoCal, then wait for it to quit raining, then sticker it outside exposed to the sun for a few weeks.
Will also work in colder climates, just take longer.
Lew
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I wish I was in SoCal! I'm in New Jersey, so it's currently about between 15 and 35 degrees these days. The wood is in my garage so it's not as cold in there, probably in the mid 40s. Do you think the lumber yard will come pick it up and exchange it for some kiln dried wood. dried wood seems hard to find in NJ.
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wrote:

I wish I was in SoCal! I'm in New Jersey, so it's currently about between 15 and 35 degrees these days. The wood is in my garage so it's not as cold in there, probably in the mid 40s. Do you think the lumber yard will come pick it up and exchange it for some kiln dried wood. dried wood seems hard to find in NJ.
Bring it into the house for a few months. You are single, right?
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Not Single... But I could move it to the basement which is probably in the low 60s. How long do I need to wait? Am I better off just using it now before it twists or warps? Will it laminate ok with glue?
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wrote:

Not Single... But I could move it to the basement which is probably in the low 60s. How long do I need to wait? Am I better off just using it now before it twists or warps? Will it laminate ok with glue?
Move it into the basement, cover it with a tarp and put a dehumidifier under the tarp making sure the output of the dehumidifier isn't blocked.
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In article <c22810cc-f17d-44f8-aef9-84f31d7acfe5

That's kind of a neat design -- easy to build but sturdy. The clamps will cost a little bit. And I wish the kid would turn the planes on their sides when he's done with them.
S.
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RE: Turning planes on their sides. I read about a cool tip to protect the blades... use those business card magnet things that pizza places and plumbers give a way... place it on the sole of the plane.
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RE: Turning planes on their sides. I read about a cool tip to protect the blades... use those business card magnet things that pizza places and plumbers give a way... place it on the sole of the plane.
Good idea except my planes have wooden soles. Darn.
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Thats a personal thing. I was taught to turn them, but after nicking them or myself I have started leaving them upright. They are less prone to getting nicked, and so am I. I have never understood how leaving them on there side is good, but I followed it for years until I knew better.

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<nospam.nospam.com> says...

It's a good habit because one might set the plane on non-wood surfaces, including screws &c, but mostly (I think) because it can mess around with your depth adjustments. But if you're getting nicked a lot with your tools, you gotta do what you gotta do.
S.
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"Josh" wrote:

between 15 and 35 degrees these days.
Interesting, one of the reasons for kiln drying is to reduce the weight for shipping.
Some must be kiln dried to be able to use it.
When I was in Ohio, almost all the construction lumber was kiln dried.
Evidently you have wood that can be worked wet.

it's not as cold in there, probably in the mid 40s.
If you can get it in the basement it will be almost as good as direct sunlight in the summer.
A heated house has low relative humidity in the winter.
Maybe a month and you will be good to go.

lumber yard will come pick it up and exchange it for some kiln dried wood. dried wood seems hard to find in NJ.
Maybe, but I wouldn't hold my breath, but like chicken soup, asking "hadn't ought a hurt".
Lew
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I would think you can sticker it inside in cold DRY weather. Maybe add a small fan.
One would think this would work.
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Hoosierpopi wrote:

...
... Albeit slowly, yes... :)
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I live in Jersey too. I can get dried construction grade lumber. Just shop around at a real lumber yard.
I would see if they will take it back. Also this will be a fine bench for a newbie. When you are ready for maple, this will be a good finishing, or assembly bench. When you need to drive screws into it you won't be afraid to. You can build your own stop blocks, clamping devices right into the bench.
What you'll learn building this will help on the next bench. But this one will last you quite a few years.
Make sure you clamp up all the dried lumber for 2 or 3 weeks to hold it from warping while it finishes air drying in your shop. Or build it and weight it down with some cement or sand bags for a few weeks after while it dries assembled. After the wood is dried you can level the top.
Josh wrote:

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tiredofspam wrote:

I think that's the key here. First of all, it's cheaper wood than maple, regardless of which soft wood you choose. I did a lot of things with softwood before I felt OK with tackling harder woods, and I found the softwoods more forgiving for the things I was doing.
Secondly, there's no real waste of time. The bench will give you lots of enjoyment when you use it, not to mention the wonderful feeling of satisfaction you'll have when it's finished, but still has its virginal cherry. That won't last long, but it's still worth calling up relatives and bringing in people you don't know from the street and showing it off to them.
You said you were a newbie. Maybe this will spur you on to become less of a newbie, or maybe you'll be satisfied with just doing a few projects from time to time. If the latter is the case, then you'll likely get to a point where you want a more substantial bench. But you'll always have this one to look at and do lessons learned on it.
There are many different levels of skill in the Wreck, but I can broadly generalize it into three: professionals, amateur hobbyists and the very exacting group that demands the best all the time of everything. This last group can be either pros or amateurs.
Each group will look at a problem from their own perspective and that has to be taken into account when you ask for an opinion.
In this question, you're lucky because you have a wide range of opinions. Some support your original idea, some don't. But lots of them give you flexibility to alter your ideas if need be.

--
Tanus

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http://www.oldtoolsshop.com/z_pdf/shopImprov/BobAndDavesGoodFastAndCheapBench-ne.pdf
Thanks for the link.
I would be reluctant to use green limber for a work bench. You want the bench to be true and stable. I would be afraid of movement as the lumber acclimated.
That said, better lumber yards, NOT THE BORGS, can supply you with Kiln Dried construction grade lumber and at not too much more of an expense. When it counts I buy this type lumber.
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if you could put it in your basement in a confined area on sticks with heat, (up to about 110 degrees) and a fan on slow you could take it to low enough moisture in about 10 days. this would depend on the moisture content of the wood now, i'd guess about 18 to 20 % and relative humidity. try googling drying lumber and look at EMC equalibriam moisture content. ross www.highislandexport.com
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I'm sure your construction lumber is kiln dried. But you either forgot or did not know an important fact. The amount of moisture in kiln dried construction lumber, what you bought, is about 18%. Give or take. The amount of moisture in kiln dried hardwwod or any wood used in furniture building is about 8%. Give or take. Construction lumber is designed, made for house building. It does not need super low moisture content to be usable. So the suppliers do not waste money making it drier than necessary. They could not compete against other suppliers because their cost would be much higher for their wood because of the extra expense of kiln drying longer. Hardwoods or furniture grade softwoods have to be much lower moisture percentage to be usable. So everyone has to spend the extra money on a longer kiln drying process or they could not sell their wood at all.
You're trying to use a product not designed for the use you intend. And now you are blaming the supplier for your mistake.
Personally, I think a workbench should be built as nice as possible so you take pride in using it. I'm not a fan of cheap, quick construction lumber benches. If you have to have cheap and quick, then make the base of softwood and make the top of hardwood. Either make or buy a hardwood top. Cheap, quick softwood benches are fine for construction sites or garage/barn do everything work areas.
The bench you link to has some serious flaws. The metal vise used as an end vise requires the long row of dog holes to be centered on the metal vise or else the vise will rack everytime its used and be worthless very quickly. Thus the long row of dog holes are about 6 inches in from the side of the bench. Too far to be useful. If you go down to the bottom of the website you linked to you will see a nice hardwood bench. Notice its end vise is the traditional one and its dog holes are about 1 inch in from the edge. You can clamp narrower pieces in the end vise and have the edge overhang the bench side. Read Scott Landis' workbench book and Sam Allen's workbench book for better ideas on how to build a bench.
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On Jan 25, 8:55am, " snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com"

GREEN, unseasoned, and undried Douglas Fir is readily available at lumber yards in NJ. All construction lumber is NOT kiln dried! That being said, I called the lumber yard this morning, and they said they can switch out everything for kiln dried spruce. I'm going to go to the lumber yard and check out the wood before the deliver/switch it. I am a major newbie to woodworking and I don't see why building this bench and later graduating to a better one isn't a reasonable plan. It seems much better than working on a sears handyman style bench, or a workmate. Why attempt to build a bench out of Scott Landis' book with absolutely no experience and using expensive wood? Regarding the end vise. I was planing on fashioning jaw pads with 3 dog holes in them. And drilling 3 rows of round dog holes on the bench top.. rather than chiseling out the one row of square holes in the plans. Do you think this bench is a major waste of time? I thought it was a good compromise between a handyman style bench and a euro style woodworking bench.
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