Workbench design help?

Page 2 of 2  


Yep. I've seen that comment in a number of places. And they're harder to build.
So why are they on so many benches? Still trying to figure out how that's any improvement over simply mounting a normal Record or Wilton vise at the end of the bench...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 04/07/2013 12:26 PM, Doug Miller wrote:

Here's one guys argument for the traditional tail vise:
<http://www.toolsforworkingwood.com/store/blog/180/The%20Argument%20for%20a%20Traditional%20Tail%20Vise
or
http://tinyurl.com/bqexwco
--
"Socialism is a philosophy of failure,the creed of ignorance, and the
gospel of envy, its inherent virtue is the equal sharing of misery"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

20Traditional%20Tail%20Vise>

I've read that article several times, and I'm still unconvinced. He writes:
"The main reason why a traditional tail vise is so darn useful is because of the unobstructed gap you get in the front of your bench. this gives you the perfect way to solidly clamp chair legs, or any long part that needs to be held while you work on it from one end. You also have space on both sides of the work for tools."
But a leg vise accomplishes essentially the same thing, without the difficulties of installation. And it won't ever sag.
He also says:
"the tail vise also has dog holes so I can easily clamp boards ... longer than my bench,"
Not very much longer, he can't.
"and have them supported all along the underside, except for a small gap. With a end mounted face vise you just don't get that kind of support. "
This is simply nonsense. An end mounted face vise is also capable of clamping boards longer than the bench and having them supported over nearly their entire length
--
regardless of the type of vise, it's the *bench* that supports the board, not
the vise, over
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/7/2013 3:26 PM, Doug Miller wrote:

Because they offer a lot of benefits too. The sagging can be fixed. Usually the support pieces underneath need redoing.
I'll see if I can post a pic of the underneath of an L from Frank Klausz's bench.
--
Jeff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

But what *are* the benefits? What can I do with that type of vise that I can't do, or can't do as easily, with a leg vise or an end-mounted face vise?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/7/2013 5:02 PM, Doug Miller wrote:

One of the benefits is having support on both sides of the jaws with the traditional. When using a standard vise, like on mine, I only get 3 inches of support over the vise. (The depth of my pad on my vises face)
There are a few others I am sure.But of course you are right most can be done with a metal vise. I would like to have a traditional over the metal vise I have. But I compromised.
--
Jeff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/7/2013 3:26 PM, Doug Miller wrote:

See the binaries I posted pics of Frank Klauz's bench article.. just the tail vise section... pictures are worth a 1000 words.
--
Jeff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

e

.

to do that now

at it funny, so I'm

ertainly valid, but I

you disagree, I'd

like this one?
http://www.workbenchdesign.net/images/klbench1.jpg
Not sure how the vise in your picture is built, but this link shows more detail of the construction of a traditional tail vise and the reason for the "L": http://www.toolsforworkingwood.com/store/blog/262/title/The%20Traditional%2 0Tail%20Vise%20-%20Followup
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/7/2013 3:36 PM, Denis G. wrote:

http://www.toolsforworkingwood.com/store/blog/262/title/The%20Traditional%20Tail%20Vise%20-%20Followup

I thought there might be a guide on that end.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

tle

ch.

nt

o

ve to do that now

ok at it funny, so I'm

e certainly valid, but I

if you disagree, I'd

ses like this one?
http://www.workbenchdesign.net/images/klbench1.jpg

Scott Landis' book (The Workbench Book) in Chap. 4 also has the details from when he visits Frank Klausz's workshop.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Remember you have PSI - or pounds per square inch. The wide face provides low PSI and as you try to add more you run the risk of breaking the screw.
I thought the table length vises were double screws.
Martin
On 4/7/2013 9:24 AM, Doug Miller wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
16.dc1.easynews.com:

Well, yes, but... first, high clamping pressures aren't normally needed when holding boards for woodworking with either hand or power tools, and second, I'm not really all that worried about breaking a 1" diameter steel screw. I'm pretty sure the vise's mounting bolts would rip out of the benchtop first.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Cool site, the videos are interesting.
But, what is the purpose or function of the split tops on the benches?
-Zz
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It is just a tool tray. This is a feature on many benches on one side. If you add another top on the other side, then you have the split top bench.
Two problems with this though. 1) Those tool trays are shavings, sawdust, junk collectors. I know I have one. You have to clean them out regularly or parts, small tools etc get lost in there. 2) If you had a large project on a split top bench, it could end covering up the tool tray. You would then lose access to whatever was in there.
One feature that I have built into a number of benches, that I really like, is a tool shelf UNDER the top. About 8 - 10 inches is tall enough. You can put all kinds of things under there, access them immediately, and not have it clutter or compromise the primary work surface.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.