Workbench depth and height?

Page 2 of 2  
On 10/27/11 5:24 PM, Father Haskell wrote:

Wow, didn't answer either question.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I let my table saw guide me as to the height and my "chop saw" determine the depth (I built-in an area to hold the 12" Miter/Chop Saw). The height allows me to use the bench and table saw top to support longer / wide items from time to time.
The idea, elsewhere of leaving a space below the top to store miscellaneous tools and such is a good one - improved by fixing drawers in the space so you can store stuff the full depth of the bench and still retrieve them. Taking this a step further, the space under the bench is best fitted with deep and wide drawers for the same reasons.
Design for a vise - retrofitting a vise is a royal pita and at least one vice is a great idea that wll get lots of use. The top of the vise jaws in the same plane as the bench top (or slightly 1/32-1/16" below) and at the right or left hand corner depending on your preference.
I built mine with a quarter-inch sheet of Masonite over top of the structural top material with the idea of replacing the top if/when needed.
I also built-in a power strip at the front edge of the bench so I don't have cables running over the bench top. Mine was a steel strip that allowed me to recess it into the front apron a few inches below the top. The cord for it ran underneath the top to the wall outlet behind the bench. (Actually, I have three of these on the apron - Left, Middle & Right because you can never have enough outlets.
If you're into hydraulics, you can do as a fellow I met in Florida and build a bench that can be raised or lowered - it was really cool. He could lower it so it was comfortable to sit and work or raise it when standing and working on a project! He also had re-worked his floor mounted drill press to oscillate the quill so he could use sanding drums with it.
...........
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/27/11 5:57 PM, Hoosierpopi wrote:

This is one of the main reason I'm building it. I haven't had the miter saw incorporated with a permanent spot in the shop. I wrote "against the wall" with the intent to avoid the dozen or so replies about a middle-of-the-shop bench. It didn't work. :-) This is a one-car garage that would barely hold one car.
I have several tools along that wall and want to clean it up and have them on the bench, able to evenly support longs boards at each tool. I also want to ability to quickly move a tool not often used up to the bench, then out of the way to use the bench for working.
I'm going to have at least a portion of the underneath area that will run the entire length (12') of the bench, because I've never had an area to store longer boards until use. I have tool storage in other areas, so even though I may incorporate a drawer or two, I'm more interested in being able to have that long lumber slot and the ability to store bigger, seldom used tools (grinder, planer, etc.) and have a parking spot for the shop vac.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/27/2011 7:47 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

This is precisely why I took the route that I did. I had a two car garage, in an area where the winter temps were normally in the 20's.
I tried to make all of the bench fixtures in my "shop" mobile. My work bench, table saw. etc are all on wheels and the work areas are all the same height. I have a large piece of plywood that covers the table saw which has wings on each side so it can be used as a work surface for gluing, assembly, etc.
The work bench has end storage units where I keep small tools, like my dremmel, jig saw, electric sander, etc. and shelves between for storage of frequently used tools. The table saw has a storage shelf under it.
When in use the mobile units can be arranged in the configuration that provides the best work flow for the project that I am working on. Sometime the work bench is an out feed table, some time the cutting area is the workbench and the table saw is the assembly table, sometime the work bench is a staging area for pieces I am cutting on the table saw. Units are moved around to minimize walking and so every thing I am working with is conveniently with in reach.
When not in use each of the mobile units has its place along the garage wall so the garage can perform it intended use, protect the cars from the elements.
My vice, manual miter box, bench grinder, router table, etc. are mounted on 2X10, 12' etc. and stored in a shelf unit until needed. When in use, I clamp the 2x to the top of the workbench. (The work bench to is half lapped 2X4 rabbeted to accept a piece of plywood so it is flush with the 2X4)
While I have had this set up for years, there is a video of someone's shop who took this concept to the extreme. It can be found by googling.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/27/11 7:22 PM, k-nuttle wrote:

All my large power tools are currently on wheels and while it's a nice concept, it simply doesn't work well in a single car garage. Your two car might as well be a warehouse compared to mine. I get very sick of having to roll out commonly used tools and support tables, which don't always (read: rarely) meet up correctly with the tool height. My table saw has a fold up out-feed table that suits 95% of its needs.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Does this mean your car will stay outside from now on?
Mine both park in the driveway for the summer. When it gets much below freezing they come in and only get bounced out when warmer days and woodworking goes on. Sawdust is a problem for other equipment though.
----------------- "-MIKE-" wrote in message
On 10/27/11 7:22 PM, k-nuttle wrote:

All my large power tools are currently on wheels and while it's a nice concept, it simply doesn't work well in a single car garage. Your two car might as well be a warehouse compared to mine. I get very sick of having to roll out commonly used tools and support tables, which don't always (read: rarely) meet up correctly with the tool height. My table saw has a fold up out-feed table that suits 95% of its needs.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What? What? Just generally pleasant commentry? No Bullshit or Fuck Off? You sick boy? Your mom kick you out of the basement or something else equally terrifying?
You're not allowed to be just a regular person here. We need more than just Twayne to call an asshole.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Chris Caputo
------------
"Dave" wrote in message wrote:

What? What? Just generally pleasant commentry? No Bullshit or Fuck Off? You sick boy? Your mom kick you out of the basement or something else equally terrifying?
You're not allowed to be just a regular person here. We need more than just Twayne to call an asshole.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/28/2011 8:52 AM, Dave wrote:

I had just about forgotten about Lyl'wayne. Is he still here. LOL
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Not as often, but he looks in with a comment now and then. But, Josepi is still here. Between Twayne, Josepi and m II, we have a perfect trio of twits. All that any self respecting newsgroup ask for.
(It's Saturday night and I'm bored. What else can I say?)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
: If you're into hydraulics, you can do as a fellow I met in Florida and : build a bench that can be raised or lowered - it was really cool. He : could lower it so it was comfortable to sit and work or raise it when : standing and working on a project!
Do you have any details? I'm building height-adjustable bench with an electric base I got from surplus, but would ideally like another, and hadn't considered hydraulics.
-- Andy Barss
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I let my table saw guide me as to the height and my "chop saw" determine the depth (I built-in an area to hold the 12" Miter/Chop Saw). The height allows me to use the bench and table saw top to support longer / wide items from time to time.
The idea, elsewhere of leaving a space below the top to store miscellaneous tools and such is a good one - improved by fixing drawers in the space so you can store stuff the full depth of the bench and still retrieve them. Taking this a step further, the space under the bench is best fitted with deep and wide drawers for the same reasons.
Design for a vise - retrofitting a vise is a royal pita and at least one vice is a great idea that wll get lots of use. The top of the vise jaws in the same plane as the bench top (or slightly 1/32-1/16" below) and at the right or left hand corner depending on your preference.
I built mine with a quarter-inch sheet of Masonite over top of the structural top material with the idea of replacing the top if/when needed.
I also built-in a power strip at the front edge of the bench so I don't have cables running over the bench top. Mine was a steel strip that allowed me to recess it into the front apron a few inches below the top. The cord for it ran underneath the top to the wall outlet behind the bench. (Actually, I have three of these on the apron - Left, Middle & Right because you can never have enough outlets.
If you're into hydraulics, you can do as a fellow I met in Florida and build a bench that can be raised or lowered - it was really cool. He could lower it so it was comfortable to sit and work or raise it when standing and working on a project! He also had re-worked his floor mounted drill press to oscillate the quill so he could use sanding drums with it.
...........
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Typical kitchen counter, standing work surface height, is 36".
Fake what you want to do on your kitchen counter and decide from there.
----------
"-MIKE-" wrote in message
Workbench against the wall... Ideal depth from the wall? Ideal height from the ground?
(Understanding there is no "ideal.")
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/27/11 6:35 PM, Josepi wrote:

In my research I'm finding that the conventional wisdom is if you're using hand tool, you want it low so you can get your back into it. If you're using power tools, high than lower is better. Since I'm using mostly power tools and my back gets sore easily, I'm going for higher.
Also, it's a garage with a sloped floor so it will be both higher and lower. :-)
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Parallelogram top part for height adjustment?
----------- "-MIKE-" wrote in message
On 10/27/11 6:35 PM, Josepi wrote:

In my research I'm finding that the conventional wisdom is if you're using hand tool, you want it low so you can get your back into it. If you're using power tools, high than lower is better. Since I'm using mostly power tools and my back gets sore easily, I'm going for higher.
Also, it's a garage with a sloped floor so it will be both higher and lower. :-)
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
-MIKE- wrote:

*VERY* handy for bevels :)
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wednesday, October 26, 2011 3:08:14 PM UTC-7, -MIKE- wrote:

Height from ground is based on elbow height; you want your elbow above the work for planing, sawing, and the like. For me, five to ten inches below the elbow seems about right.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sounds like the distance from your elbow to your groin minus a few inches.
-------------- "whit3rd" wrote in message
Height from ground is based on elbow height; you want your elbow above the work for planing, sawing, and the like. For me, five to ten inches below the elbow seems about right.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.