Workbench Article on FWW Network?


I am thinking about buying the back issue of FWW that has the workbench construction article. I wasn't a subscriber then. But, since they are offering a $14.95 1 year subscription to their website which claims to have "1000+ searchable Fine Woodworking articles", I'm thinking that might be a better way to go, IF they have the workbench article. I would sincerely appreciate it if any online subscribers out there would do a quick search to see if it there? The issue it appeared in was the Winter 2003/2004, issue #167, the article is titled "THE ESSENTIAL WORKBENCH".
Thanks in advance.
-jj
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I'm thinking about complementing my subscription with an online subscription as well, online topical searches beats flipping through the mags.Try Woodworking Magazine it is a neat non-bias mag, I'm building the Roubo Workbench from this mag right now.
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jj,
Yes, I was just able to locate the Lon Schleining "Essential Workbench" article in PDF format on the website. I subscribed just a few days ago. I gotta say it wasn't that easy to find, but I don't know all the ins-n-outs of navigating the site yet. I found ALL the back issues' Table Of Contents, but that was under the "Store" part, where you could order back issues. Once I saw it was written by Scheining, I went back to the Home page and searched on "Schleining Essential" and it (and other articles) came up.
Yeah, at $1.25/month, I think it's definitely worth it.
-Chris
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Here's the best freebee bench plan I have seen online: http://www.popularmechanics.com/home_improvement/furniture/1302961.html
And Bugbear's pages has a page full of workbench links: http://www.geocities.com/plybench/index.html (link at the bottom).
Then there is the workbench design website: http://www.workbenchdesign.net /
And there are the two books, one by Scott Landis: "The Workbench Book", and one by Lon Schliening: "Workbenches". The Landis book has four full plans included.
I studied everything I could, both books and everything I cold find online to see how things add up, and came up with my own unique design that I am slowly building now.
This is of course, ' if ' you are wanting a woodworker's bench, not just a basic garage type of bench.
--
Alex - "newbie_neander" woodworker
cravdraa_at-yahoo_dot-com
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And there is a very simple workbench plan on my site that uses 2by lumber and a solid core door for the top: http://wuudchuck.com/2006/04/15/simple-workbench /
--
http://wuudchuck.com - Free Woodworking Plans

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Sam Allen also did a workbench book worth checking out.
If you want to go through a semi-over-the-top woodworker bench and the process of making it, with screws ups and the way I fixed them - or made some into "features" check out Das Bench - all 32 pages about it.
http://home.comcast.net/~charliebcz/BenchFinishing/CBbench0.html
Or you can check out what is now a big assembly bench that served as the only workbench for a couple of years - 1 1/8" ply, 2x4s and a piece of 1/4" melamine.
http://home.comcast.net/~charliebcz/BenchPlan.html
Suggestions
Don't make it air craft carrier deck BIG - 24" wide is plenty wide for most things and 6 feet long will probably work for just about anything you want to do. If you intend to use it to work with hand tools - planing, edge joining, cutting dovetails, mortises etc. and handsawing up a storm keep it low. Rule of thumb seems to be to stand up straight - hands at your side, palms to the rear. Bend your wrist so your palm is down and paralleling the floor-that's your bench \ height. Seems low but much of hand work involves using your body weight pressing down.
GET YOUR VISE HARDWARE FIRST - THEN BUILD AROUND THEM.
If you go with long threaded rods to hold the legs to the stretchers - get the Lee Valley "tension nuts" (see the black "button" looking things on the end of this lathe bench. Not that a routed dado in the back of the stretchers for the threaded rod to sit in is easier to do than drilling a really long hole through the length of the stretchers.
Unless you're blessed with a perfectly flat shop floor, and if you don't care for shimming a leg, look into leg levelers - preferably adjustable from above - with an allen wrench. http://home.comcast.net/~charliebcz/LegLeveler.html
Like the maxim - Buy Once, Cry Once - spend time studying what a workbench can do and pick the features that suit the type of work you do, or think you want to do - then build ONE bench that'll serve your needs 'til they pat you in the face with a shovel full of dirt and the next guy gets to benefit from your bench.
A good workbench is an often overlooked but really handy tool to have - clamps stuff, supports stuff while you work on it, a place to pound, etc..
charlie b
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Thanks everyone for the info on the FWW website and the workbench tips. I think I'll sign up for the FWW website.
As for the bench itself, I've been studying workbenches for the last few years and finally will have the time to build my version. I have amassed the basic materials already: hard maple in 4/4 and 8/4 (8' to 10' lengths, 8" to 12" widths), Lee Valley twin screw vise, Shop Fox 9" front vise (Record knockoff). I also have the Acorn workbench plans and have studied them for a while. Also got lots of great tips from this newsgroup.
I am still torn over gluing up the top myself or, since I've never glued up anything that big before, just purchasing a prefab 1-3/4" slab from Grizzly. I always thought I wanted the top to be thicker than that though. I've toyed with getting the slab and gluing reinforcements under the bench dog holes and around the edges.
Thanks again for all the info, and I know I'll have more questions once I actually get started.
-jj
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Don't worry about gluing a big project together at the same time. Just do it in sections, gluing one board or section at a time. Trying to keep multiple glue lines in the same plane at the same time is a pain. One glue line is much more relaxing.
I have been doing serious woodworking for a long time and I still glue up table tops in sections. It takes longer but I know that I am going to do it that way and plan for it.
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