Work surface - How to attach masonite

I built some base cabinets for my shop and installed a top surface of 2 - 3/4" CDX plywood sheets glued & screwed together. Next, I want to put 1/4 inch masonite (hardboard) on top for a work surface. Lastly, I will wrap the thing in a hardwood.
I want to be able to remove the masonite if I need to replace it ever. I would use countersunk screws as a last option but I would rather use an adhesive of some kind. What kind of adhesive would allow me to remove the top later? I think liquid nails or wood glue would be too permanent.
Thanks Frank
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On Fri, 19 Dec 2003 22:08:18 GMT, "Frank Ketchum"

How about a rabbet or even a 45 angle on the hardboard and holding it down with the wrap?
John, in Minnesota
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Frank, I've used tempered hardwood on benchtops several times, including a reloading bench that is over 20 years old. In all cases I've used contact cement. I would not be able to remove it to replace it of course, but I could scrape it flat and put a new sheet on top. In reality I've never seen the need to even do that. The top gets dirty and scratched, but what the hell it's a work surface, in the shop.
So, I suggest you honestly consider the likelihood that you would ever replace it. Then use solvent based contact cement.
-- Bill Pounds http://www.bill.pounds.net/woodshop

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seen
Bill
Yeah, this has crossed my mind but I've seen numerous posts recommending hardboard for a removable solution, so there must be a good way of doing it. I hadn't thought of just putting a new one on top of the old if I need to. Thanks
Frank
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Frank Ketchum notes:

Try #6 brass wood screws. Countersunk, of course. They're soft enough not to damage tool edges, but easy to remove if the time comes, even the ones with scarred tops (just drill 'em out).
Charlie Self
"Man is a reasoning rather than a reasonable animal." Alexander Hamilton
http://hometown.aol.com/charliediy/myhomepage/business.html
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I used Masonite in the same fashion. Since I work to close tolerances, the hardwood edge securely holds down the top. A couple of pieces of carpet tape could be used in case you find it not secure enough, but it really should be fine if you can measure/cut accurately.
dave
Frank Ketchum wrote:

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says...

Don't know about carpet tape, but 2-sided turners tape works great.
--
Where ARE those Iraqi WMDs?

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Same thing...substrate is likely going to be foam(think), fiberglass(medium) or plastic(thin). But all basicly the same thing.
Mike
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carpet tape worked for me. it held the top totally until one day recently when I needed to remove the top temporarily to install a vise.
dave
Larry Blanchard wrote:

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Double sided carpet tape, the good stuff.
--
Mike G.
snipped-for-privacy@heirloom-woods.net
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Thanks for this idea. I had definitely not thought about that. I don't know why, because I use carpet tape all the time with my router table. I think I will try this with the option of shooting some brads around the perimeter if necessary as Doug suggests.
Frank
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Double stick carpet tape...

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On Fri, 19 Dec 2003 22:08:18 +0000, Frank Ketchum wrote:

I used the doubleback carpet tape routine, with a liberal application - I thought - of about one third of the area covered. It worked for a day or two, then the edges started lifting. I used the Norm technique with my HF 18 ga brad nailer around the perimeter only as much as needed. All is well with very few brads after about 10 months.
I also edge banded with 3/4" red oak and gave it about 6 coats of water-based poly. Holding up well with some scratches in the poly, but not enough to look bad.
-Doug
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Put a layer of newspaper down on the surface first, then apply some Elmer's on top of it. The glue will seep through the newspaper enough to bond to the ply, but will release the masonite with a couple of pries with a putty knife. Been doing that for years.
Tom Flyer
wrote:

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Put a layer of newspaper down on the surface first, then apply some Elmer's on top of it. The glue will seep through the newspaper enough to bond to the ply, but will release the masonite with a couple of pries with a putty knife. Been doing that for years.
Tom Flyer
wrote:

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