Work pricing book

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Too true. I see work that goes for higher amounts than local turners/ artists can get simply because their bowls are turned by "Pennsylvania Craftsmen". Hey... what are we? Chopped liver?

Not counting your time of course.

Too true.

In the world of art, craftwork, or arts and crafts that certainly seems to be the truth.
But somehow I don't think I will be able to change the reality of the turnings I do for the cash. I cannot imagine anyone saying: "hey wait... is that a GENUINE <nailshooter> lamp?"
Makes me laugh!
Robert
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On Fri, 02 Nov 2007 12:10:22 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

Well, ya never know...
When I "sign" the pieces, I also burn in a number.. every piece that I think might be "art" is numbered and put in the computer.. when something sells, the DB prints a "Certificate of Authenticity" with the number and brief description of the piece and that it was "Hand crafted by Mac Davis of Baja Woodcraft".. Someday they might be worth big bucks, but as I tell my wife, I'm not ready to die to make them more valuable.. *lol*
It took a lot of suggestions from friends and some nagging by the wife before I could do these... just seemed very pompous and elitist... but I guess that's marketing for ya... ;-[
mac
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Good comparison. I recently met a young man who was adept at using an English wheel: he had built a sports car, with every body panel coming from his own hands. I didn't ask the price. My nerves will only take so much, but the fully-loaded Cobra engine might give a hint. You could probably get a Ferrari cheaper...or maybe not.
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More applicable to factories or such that hand crafted pieces, IMHO..
The flat rate books at auto repair shops tell you that if you're replacing a part on a specific vehicle, experience says that it should take "X" time to perform the task..
If folks want that kind of production stuff, suggest that they try Wal-Mart.. YMWV
mac
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We do not make X's (cf. "we do not sell pigs.")
We also do not sell Widgets.
We (and I am using the present tense albeit the near past tense is more appropriate) sell custom woodwork.
There is no economy of scale in custom wooddorking.
Your analogy hinges (good lord, that was a trifle arch) on the missing fact that there is a base of data for the replication of the item in question.
I don't think that anyone would choose to apply Six Sigma analysis to the custom wooddorking bidness.
What we do is - find out what the customer wants.
That was a damned small sentence but it embraces a module of the process that might literally take months.
We then define the limits of the customer's expectations (and ours) through drawings and submittals.
Since customers understand neither drawings, nor submittals, we go to visit them again to make sure that we are all on the same page.
Sometimes we do mockups.
Sometimes we make shadow figures on the wall (strike that)
You are usually talking about owner's or partner's time at this level (and if were paid like that it might make a lick of difference).
Then we start building stuff.
We work with an unpredictable material (Doug and Ed might disagree) and we therefore buy a sufficient quantity to ensure our adequate completion of the job. (incurring unrecoverable costs for custom material that takes probably $4.00 per hour out of the shop).
We then machine the material ( which, if a normal business had acquired the machinery would have been expensed to the job at a rate of about $12.00 per hour).
We then join the material, which, since we are the only person who can be relied on to do that job - gets billed out at owner's and partner's rate ( or about $13.00 per hour - real money).
We then take it through the finishing process - which, since we are all Pchem majors goes through without a hitch (and at the usual partner's and owner's rate of $13.00 per hour).
Then we deliver it and install it and that costs us the union rate of $54.00 per hour (for a guy who has demonstrated his past history by showing up with a canvas bag full of tools applicable to the making of concrete forms - but he does have a union card).
yadda
Regards,
Tom Watson
tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (real email)
http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 /
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