Work bench ideas and plans

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calmly ranted:

Figured wood deserves to be seen, not cursed. A bench top needs to be flat. Dead flat. Forever.
That function has beauty in itself. And there are better means of achieving it than figured wood with a high tangential expansion coefficient.
I'll score some affordable maple soon enough. And I'll coat it with Waterlox, in your honor. ;-)
Patriarch
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On Fri, 19 Nov 2004 01:39:09 GMT, patriarch

Don't you have assembly tables for that?

Yeah, that 1.148" diameter 0.020" dip could really screw up a glueup. (If you're one of those who glues on his benchtop.) And it would really warp that 8/4 stock you're flattening with the little 24" plane. ;)

Bueno, bwana.
--
Strong like ox, smart like tractor.
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Andy Dingley wrote:

Andy...
Your post provides me with yet another opportunity to display my ever growing ignorance...
Is wood generally sold by the cubit foot?
If sold in metric sizes, what are the most common nominal/actual dimensions?
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto, Iowa USA
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A board foot is simply another, less generally understood, volumetric measure, is it not?
Patriarch
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wrote:

Depends what sort of wood you're talking about.
Big stuff, odd trees, logs, waney edged boards, gets sold by the cubic foot (12 board feet). There's a lot of "finger in the air" stuff about how big a particular board measures out to be. Cube foot prices are religiously observed with no haggling, but there's a big variation in how a particular board measures up for wastage allowances, depending on who you are, how well you know the seller and when you last bought them a drink 8-)
For buying trees on a small scale (ie not whole woodlands), some people still use the "Hoppus feet" measure. This takes a few measurements off a tree and turns it into an estimated useful volume. at the level I operate (pretty small) it's common to pass a load of logs to the sawyer unmeasured, saw them up and then decide how big it was, the sawyer taking a proportion of the useful timber. Because we've had all our big native hardwood forests two hundred years ago, we're often working with farm hedges and singletons. A lot of the hardwood trees we saw today just aren't predictable for what they yield, until they've been through the bandsaw.
Sawn stuff gets a price sticker stuck on the end and you measure a length. No-one knows how that works. Our mass-market retail trade sucks.

It's still sold in imperial sizes, they're just labelled in metric. There's a lot of 19mm x 38mm around, although man-made sheets are in funny-sized 2440 x 1220mm sheets (that's still 8'x4') but the thickness is now exactly 10mm etc. rather than the old 3/8".
--
Smert' spamionam

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That oak is a sweet find for you! but I am curious about the cube foot, would that measurement be the same as our board foot of 1"x12"x12"? If so I do find myself blessed since I can get Euro beech for $6.95/bf. Your 35 ='s $65! ... which is quite outrageous unless that cube means 12"x12"X12"... then, in our B/F this is $5.41 each. Not bad for here. I paid $4.79/bf for my 32/bf of maple for my bench top.
Alex
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Bernie Hunt is still hosting some plans I made several years back for someone wanting to make a workbench with minimal tools and low cost materials. You may want something better but the plans provide some construction details that may be of help. These plans were developed from an article in FWW of a workbench that used a 3" thick hard-maple top and all hardwood construction. Estimated material cost was about $600. The basic design is the same as the bench in the article but the construction method and materials were changed to make it more affordable.
My own bench is of similar design, it's as solid now as the day I built it and I've had over 500 lbs sitting on the top of it and no wobble. I've added the Twin Screw end-vise from Lee Valley and a 6" front vise to round it out as a real work horse.
Bob S.

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Guess it would help if I included the URL.
http://www.huntfamily.com/work_bench.htm
Bob S.
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[snip]
It's too bad he doesn't post an actual photo of the bench itself as built, it would be a big help. Anywhere else I can see it?
Alex
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When I drew up the plans, I didn't own a digital camera and since the drawings are in dwg, dxf and pdf formats, we kinda thought it was covered. Surely you can view pdf files. If not go to the Adobe site and download the free Acrobat reader.
As for anyplace else having a picture of it - no. But if FWW has that original article archived and viewable on-line, that would be the only other choice I can think of...... unless some other readers that built the bench or variations of it took pictures and can post them for you. I know several people in this ng built it because I had several questions from them due to an error on one of the drawings - since corrected.
I can't say this is the ugly duckling of workbenches - since after all, it was featured in FWW (author long forgotten) but it also won't win any prizes for being pretty. It offers solid construction, easy to build, can be broke down if needed and can be made from low cost materials. You want pretty, tool trays, drawers and other bells and whistles along with a gee-whiz look for some snob appeal in your shop/garage - then this bench is not for you.
Bob S.

it
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I only need to pick-up on trestle ideas for measurements and joinery and figure on how space dog holes. I need to dado-in the holes, then face the boards together and have 3/4" square holes. Most of the top maple has been ripped, one more board to go, then cross cutting to even lengths. It will be a bit classicaly standard and with a trough, in back of that will be slots for chisels and small saws, so, more dado-ing.
Alex
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On Tue, 09 Nov 2004 06:28:08 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@consult.pretender (Jeffrey J. Kosowsky) wrote:

do a google for "free woodworking plans" and you'll find a ton of sites, most of which have bench plans and ideas... a few of my favorites are:
http://www.woodworkersworkshop.com/dcd/Woodworking/Index_of_Links/Plans_Free /
http://www.absolutelyfreeplans.com /
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Jeffrey J. Kosowsky wrote:

Here's the one I built, with the traditional shoulder vise and Veritas Twin Screw vise on the end. Theres a link near the bottom of the page that'll get you to the index for the evolution and construction of this one.
http://home.comcast.net/~charliebcz/BenchFinishing/CBbench33.html
charlie b
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One of the most awesome benches I've seen online, that was made personaly. "DAS BENCH!"
Alex
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AAvK wrote:

Ten Que Beddy Much. Stop by the shop when you've got an hour and I'll show you all the "features" I cleverly made (read screw ups that got more or less fixed and now called features/enhancments) Here are some OOPS examples while doing this bench
http://home.comcast.net/~charliebcz/OOPS/OOPS1.html fourth and fifth images
http://home.comcast.net/~charliebcz/OOPS/OOPS3.html http://home.comcast.net/~charliebcz/OOPS/OOPS4.html
The through drawers seemed like such a good idea. To date, other than to demonstrate that they can be opened from either side of the bench, I've yet to need that feature in day to day use.
To err is human. To not cut on the waste side is dumb! (MARK THE WASTE SIDE! MARK THE WASTE SIDE!)
charlie b
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I understand you, but it is the heavy bulk and thick design idea, the mass of it that makes it entirely substantial to me, Jaaaaa, ist DAS BENCH!! With the drawers it is based on a shaker type design, correct?
Already I bought my top maple of 8/4 stock and have screwed-up, 8 1/2" wide boards x 121" long cut in half the distance, 60" and 61", the ends that had some cracking, marked for that 1" cut-off I goofed on one and had to glue and clamp it, last night.
When I did the ripping, I was tought to go thirds-up from the lower side, raising the blade 1/3 at a time through that1 3/4" (a donated 12" Fuang Yung table saw LOL), and a few of the boards slightly bowed on me damn it, all on their own. One board came out tapered from 2 1/4" on one end to 2 1/8" on the other for crap's sakes, but it is the up and down width and not the clamping faces. Maybe I should buy more? naaaaawwwww.... sheesh, wait a minute... maybe so!
Now what I need is a layout pattern for dog holes, that work with vises. I have a 7"x4"12" deep woodworker's antique made by American Scale Co. KS, MO, from WAY back, all there except the sliding dog's threaded handle. That should go on the front.
Now I need an end vise, I would like a twin screw but can's afford the Veritas one, and Rockler has discontinued theirs. So, do you think two shoulder vise screws can be mounted side by side on the same face of the end of the bench and work well that way? Maybe I could buy two bicycle sprocket gears, have the local machinist bore the centers to fit the shafts and weld them on, whaddya think? (Sorry for SO MUCH text, but I am in serious learning mode here)
Alex
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Very, very nice!!
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I did this one:
http://www.chornbe.com/newhouse/firstproject /
It's taller than most, not because I'm tall (I'm not!) but because I have back problems and wanted to stand up straight. Since building it, I've added pegboard to the back, a fold-down step (like the ones you find in church pews), sanded and poly'd it (used bowling alley wax on the top!), added another front-to-back stringer down bottom and a deck down there for tool boxes and such, and added a bench vise and several dog holes. It does the trick nicely. It's also about 1 1/2 times as deep (front to back) as most work benches, so I've got tons of room. It cost me... $45? or so, not including the bench vise. I had the poly and wax already here, so that was a previously absorbed cost.
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