Woodworking Milestones?

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On Mon, 31 Jan 2005 15:52:31 -0500, "Stephen M"

Ahh, but you should see the smile on your Dad's face.
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my top milestone to achive is to be able to build in my shop with all these new fangled powertools projects as nice as my great grandfather did in the little linto he had off the side of his shed while only useing his hand tools
jim who still proudly displays several of great grand dads peices in his house
A MAN WITH THE RIGHT TOOLS CAN SURE SCREW THINGS UP
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I don't usually think in terms of milestones, but several recent one come to mind. A complete set of cabinets and a desk for SWMBO's office.
Scrapping previously made stuff and building new. I rebuilt the shop cabinets recently and I'm starting on other rooms in the house.
Using Shellac. Never had any luck until recently. I always try to do something new with each new project. That's what I like about this hobby, trying new things and slowly growing my skill.
DGA On Sun, 30 Jan 2005 20:31:29 -0800, phildcrowNOSPAM wrote:

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On 30 Jan 2005 20:31:29 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Snip
I haven't made it to the skilled craftsman measure yet but my major mileposts were:
My son wanting something I made. I made a patio chair from some 2X4s out of a library book project plan.
My daughter wanting a table to fit in an alcove. This was a first time making a table. It is a hallway/sofa table based upon a shaker design. A lot of firsts with this one. My daughter's friends wouldn't believe it was hand made and had to make closer inspections. That put a grin on my face.
Made some wall shelves that were based upon pictures from a Ballard catalog. They were listed at $90 and made for about $15 from molding. The SWMBO has six of them hanging on the walls; first major approval. Daughter has a couple now too.
First sale of work to some of my daughter's friends who wanted what I made for her patio: utility benches, patio chairs and matching small table. Real money for those; a first.
Oh, and recycling wood from dumpsters at construction sites. So I haven't spent much on wood, mostly on screws, paint, sandpaper and such.
I really enjoy the Adirondack chairs I made for myself. Just sitting in 'em makes me feel good; enjoying the day with a brew and the shop dog by my side ( oh, meant to say the SWMBO at my side). ;-)
Thunder
P.S. Project list now includes: book shelf for computer room, daughter request for cedar chest, headboard for SWMBO, and another workbench for myself. Ha! Waiting for the weather to warm up to start again.
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I've been doing some real soul searching on this idea lately myself. Having been a carpenter for over 15 years, and a wood worker for about 10, I still cannot decide at what point can a man consider himself a "master carpenter" or "master craftsman". My SWMBO (bless her) says that I am one, but that I just won't admit it. She is constantly telling me that I can do everything Norm can, and, to a point, this is true. Although I'm fully aware my learning curve is a couple of years behind him. (I wonder how and when he decided on the title!) Through internet searches, I've really found nothing to use as a measure to compare my skills to and make a decision as to what my title should be. Some info exists on the "master craftsman" of yesteryear, but the whole chain of events leading to a man's masters title is really not in operation in this country today. Here is my resume in short order: When it comes to home building, I've done it all, and learned to do it well. Whether it be rough framing, or finishing trim. ( I jokingly call myself a "rough finish carpenter") Remodeling old homes or building new, I have all the bases covered. Heck, I'm even a certified home inspector. As far as furniture/cabinet making, I rarely run into an unforeseen problem. I haven't built everything (yet!) , but I feel I have acquired enough skills to make quality casework and can run productively. I have a lathe. Turning wood is another realm of woodworking altogether. Although I can make good turnings for projects I build, occasional complications are expected. In this field, I would consider myself an amateur turner. More recently, I've began carving. The goal is to be able to carve cabriole legs and other ornamentation for period furniture. I am definitely a novice here. My first attempt at the ball and claw foot looked more like a turkey leg holding a pumpkin, but it's getting better! I think once I've learned to carve, I will be able to replicate a colonial highboy without many complications. This business of having a title wouldn't be of too much importance to me if I was only a hobbyist woodworker, but I have devoted my life to building stuff from wood. It's more than just "I'm the best carpenter I know", It's a serious passion, if not an addiction, and I believe an appropriate title should accompany. The problem lies in that no formal education exists in this country (that I know of) in which a "master's degree" could be offered for carpentry or wood working. Most every other profession I can think of has a chain of requirements needed to earn a title. The title is then what sets that person apart in their chosen profession, and in their community. I'm hesitant to put the word "master craftsman" or something next to my name simply because I really have no idea what requirements I would need to be considered as such, and I'm not sure if I'm comfortable just self proclaiming it. Any thoughts/opinions would be greatly appreciated here! Thanks, dave
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Dave Jackson wrote:

You want my take on it? People who call themselves a "master" of anything almost never are, while people who beat themselves up for years over whether they qualify to be a "master" yet are usually the true masters of any endeavor. So, ironically, not being sure whether you're really a "master" or not yet, you probably are. :)
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Did you take the "Masters" test? Actually, when I started doing woodworking I was also learning machine work. I build and repair photo equipment. I was eagerly learning to use a lathe, milling machine and the other shop tools. My boss told me that the test they were using for machinists was very easy. You have to make a steel triangle fit perfectly in a hole all three ways. I heard that and thought, that's crazy, I can do that. Well, it's not that easy. max

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On Tue, 01 Feb 2005 01:07:59 -0500, Silvan

When I was young I knew a man named Gerald Bates, he had a son named Richard, IIRC. At that time kids didn't call adults by first names so Gerald Bates was always "Mr. Bates" to me. Only later did it occur to me that a hundred or more years ago unmarried men were referred to by the title of "Master", so this man and his son would have been Mister Bates and Master Bates.
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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Even worse, the son would have been called "Dick"...
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
Get a copy of my NEW AND IMPROVED TrollFilter for NewsProxy/Nfilter by sending email to autoresponder at filterinfo-at-milmac-dot-com You must use your REAL email address to get a response.
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English public schools and preparatory schools here which use their model call the instructors "masters." We had a Bates who was our music master, who provided music by playing a Hamilton during chapel.
Master Bates on the upright organ....
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Tim Douglass wrote:

My wife had a cousin named Ima Ferris. She married, no joke, a man named Richard Dick. Mrs. Ima Dick, or Mrs. Dick Dick.
My grandmother's neighbor was/is named Julia Orange. Her husband, Mr. Orange, died, and she married a different man, also by the name of Orange, no relation. So she became Julia Orange Orange.
Names are funny.
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Looking for a wall cabinet to store my CD's in and finding nothing I liked so I designed and built my own. It was also my first use of a compressor to spray on clear lacquer. (Still looks great 5 years later). As others have said, each time I try a new technique and it works. (This process also gets me a lot of kindling!) I built a Grandmother clock from plans and am working on designing one from scratch sometime in the future.
When your neighbors come to you with problems and you know how to do it because you have already crossed that bridge. Like others have said, when it is a fun journey as well as a nice project. I spend a lot of time planning before I ever go into the shop. It is always a joy to make the first cuts on a project that until than has only existed on paper (or in my computers memory!) Bruce Rolling Thunder wrote:

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A neighbor walked into the open shop last summer - looked at some of the carving and one of the current projects -- said - "you're wasting your time in your current career" and left.
I think it was a compliment and a milestone. Either that or...
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On 30 Jan 2005 20:31:29 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

In my case when SWMBO sees something in a catalog, looks at me and says 'you can make that'!
Okay, so I've got a long way to go.
--RC
"Sometimes history doesn't repeat itself. It just yells 'can't you remember anything I've told you?' and lets fly with a club. -- John W. Cambell Jr.
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Here's one of my milestones - I guess I've reached at least "seasoned" status because my body can trim out several rooms of a house all the while my mind is firmly planted on a project i have going on in my shop! --dave
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snipped-for-privacy@TAKEOUTmindspring.com wrote:

Yeah, right now I'm at the phase of where *I* see something in a catalog and say, "I can make that." And my SWMBO looks at me w/ The Rock Eyebrow and says, "yeah, but WHEN?" Too many other house projects that don't require woodworking :(
-Chris
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TheNewGuy wrote:

Ooooooooh. OUCH. Wimminz can be so cold.
Say right after you finish that quilt that's been sitting in the closet since 1994 dear. :)
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On Wed, 02 Feb 2005 12:27:43 -0500, Silvan

Let's not even think about starting *that* discussion. SWMBO and I have worked out a policy of mutually ignoring each other's unfinished projects. I don't complain when she spends another $100 at the yarn shop and she doesn't complain when a new tool mysteriously takes up residence in my "shop".
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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The only milestone I've reached is finally completing a project where the finish item consisted of more bd ft of wood than the resulting scrap pile.

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I have had many high points eg, Completing my trade certificate in Cabinet making, and Furniture Design. Having my own business. Seeing the smile on kiddie's faces when they purchase a Toy that I have Made etc. However THE MILESTONE, was a wooden letter holder I made for my grandmother when I was 11. She lived 600km from me so visits were rare. When I was 28 we moved to the same town as her and on her mantle piece was this letter holder I had made her. She died when I was 38 and my mother gave me the letter holder. It now sits on our mantle piece. John
Shit, I am getting teary writing this and I'm now 48 sheeeeesh
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