Woodworking knife

Page 1 of 2  
I usually use a kitchen knife that's been laying around my workshop forever. I use it mostly for marking fine cuts. Does it pay to get a really good woodworking knife? If so, any recommendations?
Thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 27 Oct 2015 16:33:17 -0700 (PDT)

it depends on how the kitchen knife works now is it not cutting it
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Lee Valley has this one - 12 - 13 bucks. Perhaps worth a try ?
http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?pi870&cat=1,42936,42949
They sell a few other pricy ones also. Called marking knife and / or striking knife ? - not sure of the difference .. John T.
--- ---
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@ccanoemail.com says...

You might find this article to be of interest <http://www.wkfinetools.com/contrib/cSchwarz/markKnives/markKnives3.asp He makes a good point about the thickness and I note that very few providers of such knives give that information.
For another view, <https://paulsellers.com/2011/12/my-minimalist-tool- list-the-woodworkers-knife/> Note that both are in agreement about spear-point knives, sort of--the first finds rounding the point to be fine, the second sees it as a flaw.
Personally I find such knives a clever concept that has less utility than one might expect--I have a left and right handed set here somewhere that mostly serve as paperweights. If what you have is working for you, stick with it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, October 27, 2015 at 8:43:14 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@ccanoemail.com wrote:

Or one of their other fine products: http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?pg335&cat=1,42884
--
-Harold Hill

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, October 27, 2015 at 6:33:21 PM UTC-5, Michael wrote:

I use either a carving knife or a box knife. I sometimes use a single edge razor mounted on a dedicated handle.
Make your own with a saw blade. Or sharpen the end of an old screw driver.
Sonny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Michael wrote:

An X-ACTO knife maybe.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, October 27, 2015 at 8:13:28 PM UTC-5, Sonny wrote:

I really like the idea of making one out of a saw blade. I don't know if I have a metal cutting blade for the band saw but I'm going to check. Could be a fun project.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wednesday, October 28, 2015 at 3:23:50 PM UTC-5, Michael wrote:

be a fun project.
I have seen more than a few guys use Exacto knives as mentioned by Lew as w ell as those that use other disposable blade types. I thought the Exacto w as a great solution as they sell a holder that is a bit thicker than a penc il and holds and angled chisel cut blade you can buy at just about any hobb y store.
If you use a screwdriver, it will not be tempered and will not hold a razor edge. Saw blades are differentially tempered, which allows the teeth to b e very hard and the spine to flex. By the time you cut the teeth off to ma ke your desired blade shape, you are in untempered, soft metal.
I made a simple one with a sawzall bi metal blade and it works like a champ . Can't put my hands on it as I think I was using it to trim molding and i t walked off a job. Nonetheless, it is an easy and fun project. I didn't make the double point model. Plenty of good examples of marking knives pro jects/instructions here:

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=making+a+marking+knife

Robert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wednesday, October 28, 2015 at 4:12:33 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote :

ld be a fun project.

was a great solution as they sell a holder that is a bit thicker than a pe ncil and holds and angled chisel cut blade you can buy at just about any ho bby store.

be very hard and the spine to flex. By the time you cut the teeth off to make your desired blade shape, you are in untempered, soft metal.

it walked off a job. Nonetheless, it is an easy and fun project. I didn' t make the double point model. Plenty of good examples of marking knives p rojects/instructions here:

I've never tempered steel. The video makes it look like even a weekender li ke me can handle it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Lots of home shop guys and weekenders do it. There are plenty of resources on the Internet about it. Hardening is fairly easy, getting the proper temper not as much.
One thing to note is that the composition of the steel is as important as the hardening process. Some steel will never be suitable for some projects. (Just like you wouldn't use basswood for a hand plane sole.)
Play around with what you have if you want to play, then buy proper material when it comes to make some real ones. I made a few knives with hacksaw blades, and they work but are really too flexible to be good as a knife blade. (I never did mess with the temper, though. It might help.)
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 28 Oct 2015 13:23:44 -0700 (PDT), Michael

I have one made from a band saw blade the blade was 1 1/4 inch, my dad made it he worked at JI Case (formerly IH) prototype pattern shop. The band saw was for sawing stuff in half for cut away displays you could literaly drive a tractor and cut it down the middle.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/28/2015 4:23 PM, Michael wrote:

so you won't be able to cut the saw blade on your band saw with a metal blade. It will burn the blade, as the speed of a wood working saw is really way too fast. That said, it's still possible, since it can be done with a friction cut.
--
Jeff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wednesday, October 28, 2015 at 9:47:35 PM UTC-5, woodchucker wrote:

good woodworking knife? If so, any recommendations?

ld be a fun project.

I didn't have a metal band saw blade so I tried the hacksaw. I got about tw o inches cut and then set it aside for now. I'll hack a couple of inches a day or whenever I can get out there. I really like how Paul Sellers uses a woodworking knife to make perfect saw cuts for dovetails and other cuts. Th at's what I'm actually after.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Lube is especially helpful when cutting metal with a hacksaw. Paraffin wax helps, but is nowhere near as good as a product like Boelube. The stuff I got is in solid form, probably a wax emulsion. It was cheapest at use- enco.com, about $3 for a small stick. (I waited for a free shipping no minimum promo...then bought 3.)
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wednesday, October 28, 2015 at 11:57:06 PM UTC-5, Michael wrote:

I used a hacksaw to cut an old handsaw blade, not a circular/table saw blade, for one of my knives.
My first cabinet scraper was made from the same handsaw blade. I often use this scraper to scrape dried glue (lines), before sanding, belt sanding or scraping with a store-bought scraper.
I've never tried making a knife blade with a circular/table saw blade.
Sonny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

This would make the task a whole lot easier.
http://www.hfqpdb.com/coupons/76_ITEM_4-1_2__ANGLE_GRINDER_1440790538.0863.JPG
http://www.hfqpdb.com/coupons/270_ITEM_4-1_2__CUT-OFF_WHEELS_FOR_METAL_-_PACK_OF_10_1442196314.5277.jpg
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, October 29, 2015 at 12:57:06 AM UTC-4, Michael wrote:

y good woodworking knife? If so, any recommendations?

ould be a fun project.

a day or whenever I can get out there. I really like how Paul Sellers uses a woodworking knife to make perfect saw cuts for dovetails and other cuts. That's what I'm actually after.
Do you have (or know a friend who has) a radial arm saw?
In the thread entitled "what is the value of a sears craftsman 10 inch radial arm saw model no. 113.29411" I described how I used to use a RAS with an abrasive blade to cut steel plates, some up to 12" wide and 1/2" thick.
I'll bet that method would make quick work of cutting a circular saw blade.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com says...

For this kind of thing a Dremel with a cutoff wheel is your friend. It's amazing what you can cut with a package of cutoff wheels and some patience. Of course if you've got an angle grinder even better--same principle faster cut.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, October 30, 2015 at 6:25:47 PM UTC-5, J. Clarke wrote:

lly good woodworking knife? If so, any recommendations?

Could be a fun project.

s a day or whenever I can get out there. I really like how Paul Sellers use s a woodworking knife to make perfect saw cuts for dovetails and other cuts . That's what I'm actually after.

I actually did try that. It was really unwieldy but the wheel did do some o f the work. I'm still at it.
Thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.