woodworking gloves?

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I to often will get a splinter when, for example, putting pressure ona a board against a router table while pushing with the other hand. Are there gloves meant for wood working to help prevent that? Id like to have something I could wear the entire time so they would have to be supple enought to hold a pencil and write and hold a small steel rulter so the thick leather construction gloves wont work for that. thanks
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Mine aren't specially for woodworking, but I really like unlined kidskin gloves. They are thin, supple and stop all splinters (so far). Get a nice snug fitting set and they will stretch to a comfortable fit. Too bad I couldn't find mine yesterday when I was working with genuine weatherbeaten barn wood. It's beautiful but I got about six splinter doing the job.
Chuck
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Have you looked for gloves at any hardware or big-box store lately? There are a variety of styles of fairly thin, form-fitting gloves that can supposedly be worn while picking up nails and other small pieces, but still have leather or synthetic abrasion-resistant palms for protection. I wore some woodworking for a while, but I found they didn't last too long (the suede between the leather palm pads wore through quickly), and I was always taking them off to feel the smoothness of wood anyway. So I gave up, and only wear gloves while working with very rough stock now. I do knock off a tiny bit of sharp edges with a block plane after I plane and joint stock to size, and that helps with splinters/barked knuckles. I suppose the ideal would be just to build up the calluses on your hands so rough wood isn't hard to handle, but unfortunately I can't do woodworking full-time (yet?...) so my hands end up staying pretty soft for now, and I deal with scrapes and the occasional splinter as they come. Good luck, Andy
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good idea. Ill check it out. thanks

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These are good. I have been wearing them all year, but not totally splinter proof. http://www.irwin.com/irwin/consumer/jhtml/browse.jhtml?catId=IrwinCat100556
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the carpenters gloves on that page i mean.
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try atlas 370 palmflex gloves- use them at work on night crew at a store often picking up wood pallets with them. Before using gloves I occasionally picked up a splinter that would get infected. Pallets are bad news in that you never know what they have been sitting in or had slapped on top them.The 370 gloves are flexible with the nylon knit body and the nitrile palm. Pat
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I give the nod to these too. What I'd really like to see is a dedicated "ripping glove" that has some flexible UHMW plastic in the side of the index finger and thumb so you can use your (left) hand as a human finger board. Does anyone know what I mean? I wrap duct-tape around the index finger,which works for a while.
In any event, the Atlas 370 or similar gloves are great. JP
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YES, YES I do. I have really big hands so no matter what gloves I wear it feels like the fingers of the glove stop half way down my fingers. I think this is a job for Lee Valley...
wrote:

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Glove and machine tools DON'T go together. Great way to loose a finger or more.

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trs80 wrote:

I use "Carver's Tape", sold by Lee Valley and Woodcraft, on my thumb and forefinger. You can slip it off in one piece, and use the "thimble" oevr and over.
Before I discovered carver's tape, I used hockey tape in the same manner.
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trs80 wrote: > I to often will get a splinter when, for example, putting pressure ona a > board against a router table while pushing with the other hand. Are there > gloves meant for wood working to help prevent that?
<snip>
You are either the biggest dumb fuck on the planet or a troll.
Lew
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On Mon, 16 Apr 2007 18:29:36 GMT, Lew Hodgett

Lew, you really should not hold back. We want to know how you REALLY feel. R!
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Having an Imus moment? Why couldn't you have explained why gloves aren't such a good idea? You are really getting to be like the little kid in the kindergarten classroom that has to constantly raise his hand with the answer. Shovel the snow off your fiberglass boat and get busy!
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On 16 Apr 2007 12:34:33 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Grudge eh?
Mark
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:
> Having an Imus moment? Why couldn't you have explained why gloves > aren't such a good idea? You are really getting to be like the little > kid in the kindergarten classroom that has to constantly raise his > hand with the answer. Shovel the snow off your fiberglass boat and get > busy!
There was a time when my response to the above would have been to suggest that you perform aerial intercourse with a rotating annular spheroid concentrating your efforts on a centrally located sphinter; however, these days more important ways of spending my time are available.
Perhaps the easiest thing for all concerned is to be placed in each other's respective kill file.
Lew
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There are some folks that are of the opinion that gloves should never be worn while woodworking. I'm not one of them. I don't stick my bare hand (too) near to moving blades, nor do I do so with a gloved hand. Is there a possibility that a blade will catch your glove and rip your whole hand off or into the blade? Maybe, but more likely it'll just cut the glove before it cuts your finger. I wear snug- fitting gloves with a rubbery grip a lot when I'm working with rough sawn or as found timber. And hemlock or Douglas Fir frequently give cause to pull them out too. Catching a sliver halfway through a rip and pulling your hands away in pain is dangerous too, IMO.
JP
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com says...

Hear, hear. Not to mention having 8 inches worth of roughsawn pushed through your unprotected hand while ripping 'cause you've hit a knot or some funny grain or a wet spot and you're getting a spot of kickback. That is not a fun experience as I can attest (happened only once, but once is enough).
I also insist on wearing gloves when I am working with an inverted belt sander that's clamped into the bench so I can pre-finish something that is free-form. That's saved my skin more than once when I slipped.
I use tight fitting, thin rigger gloves. Plenty of fingertip sensitivity and they're so tight that anything that would catch them would do serious damage to my careless fingers (and I keep those well clear; I am just as careful if not more when wearing gloves - for the obvious reasons).
-P.
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"Jay Pique" wrote in message

Not "while woodworking", but while operating woodworking machinery. The rest of the industrial world, when utilizing machinery, has learned to discourage the practice for good and practical safety reasons. That said, those insisting on learning the hard way are certainly free to exercise their options.
--
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Material handling is a good time to wear gloves. Rough lumber, even from a band mill can be tough on the hands. When it comes time to joint, plane or saw, off they come.
I've been to more than a few hand maimings, and gloves really add to the damage, even if they don't necessarily catch and cause. Your body has become fairly familiar with where its parts are, so adding an extension is asking for trouble.
Still, there are those who believe that old baloney about being saved from injury because they weren't wearing their seatbelts.
Natural selection.
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