Woodworking bench design

Anybody got any pointers to designs for woodworking benches?
I'm sketching-out some ideas for a woodworking bench top to fit on an existing sturdy metal frame. The top's going to be 1500x660 (overhanging slightly at each end), a tool well at the back, a quick release vice set on the front and a standard vice on the end. Probably also a removable panel to drop-in a router. Buying/laminating loads of Beech strips seems like too much work and expense so I'm thinking of laminating 3 layers of 18mm ply (or maybe MDF) and edging it with some 30mm wide Beech. There'll be a sacrificial layer of 6mm MDF on the top that will get changed when necessary. Does this sound sensible? Any suggestions for (UK) stockists of thicker ply? or HDF, or Beech kitchen worktops at a sensible price?
Dave (I'll post this in alt.woodworking too)
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Not sure about woodworking benches, but for all those nicely rounded metric numbers - sounds like step one in your project is to buy a Domino...
- jbd
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NoSpam wrote:

Google has lots of info. See also the following books:
"The Workbench: A Complete Guide to Creating Your Perfect Bench", Lon Schleining
"The Workbench Book: A Craftsman's Guide to Workbenches for Every Type of Woodworking", Scott Landis
"Making Workbenches: * Planning * Building * Outfitting", Sam Allen
Chris
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I'll second the recommendation of both those books - I've read both and found them both excellent. Andy
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Well, the other source to look into is pretty much anything by Chris Schwartz, one of the editor types at Popular Woodworking, a US based magazine. That, and Woodworking, which is sort of newstand only in the States, and no ads. A great bit of publishing that may or may not live.
Chris also has a book on benches and their use due this fall. What I use is similar to what the OP talks about, from the magazine about 5 or 6 years ago. Hasn't caused sufficient grief to build ME another bench, although I did a simple one for my dad a couple of years back.
The gist of the story is 'build it heavy and stronger than you think you will need. Be willing to modify it, if needed. Don't make it too fancy with finishes, if you intend to do real work on it.'
It's a workbench. Think of it as part of your biggest clamping system. And have at it.
Patriarch
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wrote:

The current issue, Issue #162, June 2007, has a compilation of "Rules for Workbenches". Nothing you don't already know, probably, but several things it'd be good to keep in mind during the design process. I violated a couple of them building mine a few years ago and I'm seriously considering tearing it down and rebuilding.
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Tom Veatch wrote:

Current issue of what magazine?
Chris
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My first bench that I just finished was made by taking a second-hand Oak butcher block kitchen table about 1" thick and backing it up with two layers of 3/4" plywood.
To keep it flat while screwing I put the top on the TS and clamped a caul across the center and screwed it down then moved the caul toward the end and screwed again. When I reached the end I went back to the center and worked toward the other end. Then repeated fo the second layer of plywood. The top came out amazingly flat using this method. If you want to do this plan ahead for dog holes and leg & vise mounting so you don't end up drilling through one of the screws. I used the cutoffs from the table top to wrap the edges. The top was so heavy I could not use my TS to trim the ends because the saw would have tipped.
Sorry about the Royal measurements but the Queen is in town...
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If I had a 125 foot workbench I could start my cocobolo telephone pole project....Does anyone know where I can get a 100 foot extention for my jet mini lathe with free shipping? ;)
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NoSpam wrote:

Ikea http://www.ikea.com/ sells Birch, Beech and Oak counter tops..... I thought the price reasonable (I bought several) and the one I installed so far looks very good.
The magazine with the recent article on bench design was Popular Woodworking. Rod
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On Thu, 10 May 2007 11:57:35 -0700, "Rod & Betty Jo"
...

Thanks for backstopping me. Just noticed I posted the issue number, date, and everything except the name of the darned magazine. Those blasted senior moments are coming all too frequently.
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<Tom Veatch> wrote in message wrote:

Those (of which I already share) senior moments are either a sad state of affairs<G> or a new explanation for what used to be youthful exuberance.....My omissions haven't changed just what I call them...Rod
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Although my own memory is not that good, I've been told (by a 92 year old aunt who remembers every damned embarrassing moment in the lives of her many nieces and newphews) that my "senior" moments seem to have started just about the time my second tooth came in.
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