Woodworking and Retirement

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wrote:

One dollar per sq foot is a good deal for most hardwoods.
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My grandfather kept at it until the day he died at 87. He wasn't much into machinery which permitted the rest of the family not to worry about what he was doing so long as I got to do the laborious stuff like surface plane his stock, drive to the lumberyard, and make turnings. He was content in his last several years to make simple items like magazine racks, birdhouses, small tables, bar stools from parts largely supplied by me. Can't say I learned nearly enough from the guy by the time I went off to college.
I'd say it's perfectly safe as long as you have a reasonably steady hand, aren't getting too forgetful, and don't attempt to turn logs into lumber. It's even better if you can find some amenable high school kid to keep you company.
J.
Philly wrote:

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wrote:

we be ol' farts by gimminy...
been sniffin wod al mi liffe and work it now n than.. *spit*
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
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Philly:
Looks like my original reply didn't go as expected.
Anyways -
To your question about limitations - use what you have! Many replies have been about woodworkers (Krenov, Maloof) who are still creative into their 80's. I think Sam has enough wood collected to last him several more lifetimes. But the thing is from what I gather is that they are still enthusiastic about woodworking.
My wife's grandfather was active in woodworking to the end of his life (91). He made things for his grandchildren, while not artistic, were certainly labors of love. Everytime I see the pedestals he made, I think of him and hope I'm as good as he was.
I'd say, you will always be in learning mode whether or not you're 25, 45 or 75. There's enough headscratching exercises in woodworking that it should keep a person mentally healthly, which I understand is a crucial as we "age". I won't worry about achieving a specific level of "success". It will be whatever you reach and willing to strive for.
MJ Wallace
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Let's see - Sam Maloof is in his late 80s or early 90s, James Krenov's in his late 70s and is phasing out of woodworking - to make time - to play TENNIS! Tage Freid was wodworking 'til he died in his mid to late 80s.
charlie b
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I'm not retired ( quite yet) and not 80 ( 69) but I've been woodworking for a long time. Main difference I've noted is that I can no longer lift the pieces that I make by myself without straining - and I avoid that. However, one DOES learn how to move things along without lifting the total weight. You get craftier as you age .:)
In my case, I had double lens replacement surgery so my eyes are pretty close to 20/20. Main concern is dust so proper consideration should be given to dust collection, face masks etc.
Main thing? ENJOY!!!
Vic

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I'm only 57 & semi-retired. (have been WWkng for 30 years) The one thing I have learned is that the dust may well kill you- or keep you from your hobby. I'm about to order a DC (clear vue) cyclone, but have to build a small out building first- as I hate the noise. Then I can build all I want. Read about the dust hazards at Bill Pentz's website http://billpentz.com//woodworking/cyclone/index.cfm Phil
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Thanks to all for the great advice. My objective is to go at woodworking as long as I can and I'm glad to hear that it has been and is a life long hobby for many.
Philly

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