Woodsmith Video Tip??

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Some of the Woodsmith Video Tips have seemed to me to be a little "geared to the complete novice". Not that we weren't all complete novices at one time. This one borders on "what the......." . Just one dufuss's opinion.
http://www.woodsmithtips.com/2010/04/01/zero-clearance-saw-table-top/?autostart=true
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I agree that some seem a little on the 7th grade shop class level but some are helpful. I would like to see the t.v. program build one of their projects using some of their "tips" instead. Otherwise when I watch it, I start thinking about acne, video games, and if I finished my homework.
They could pick up some of the Nahm audience if they did that as well. Instead of using the drum sander that can fit an entire door, maybe some "tips" on how to flatten it with tools that most novices would or could have. I have quit watching later NYW episodes because the show seemed to be getting out of touch with the audience. No I really can't afford nor justify some of the tools he was using.
Allen
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On 4/1/2010 8:09 PM, allen476 wrote:

What I've always found most interesting about Norm's shows was not what tool he used, but his thought process in approaching the problems inherent in executing a design.
The man is a _master_ of methodology ... those who don't delve deep enough into that realm/though process would be much better off watching Woodsmith, IMHO.
For that is the level where the real value of shows like Norm's, and David J. Marks', can really benefit those wanting to improve their skills in design (DJM), and execution (both DJM and Norm).
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"Swingman" wrote:

Reminds me of my time on the design board.
As a designer, you are constantly asking yourself, "Given the shop out back, how are they going to make this monster I just designed?"
Spending a couple of quarters in one of those shops while still in school doesn't hurt your perspective either.
Lew
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On 4/1/2010 11:19 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

Wrangled a job as an "Expediter" (actually, they called us "progress chasers") in an aircraft factory in the UK back in the early sixties and had to spend a lot of my day goofing off because "I worked too much" ... (it was a union shop, not for the " white collar staff", but we had to slow down for the union buggers on the floor).
Early on I stumbled onto the "Method Engineering and Testing" section, made some friends there, and spent the best part of each day for a year hanging out, eventually helping them with some of their manual calculations.
"Method engineering" was revelation for me ... I've often thought how much more I could have enjoyed working an "office job" if it entailed doing that all day.
... well, maybe not. But I thoroughly enjoyed the concept and seemed to have an affinity for it, at least in marveling at the thought that went into the practice, and appreciating what it took to do it.
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I don't discount the methodology at all. But if you watch earlier episodes of NYW, he solved the problems with more old fashioned methods. Later episodes seemed to me to be "let's solve this problem with some new tool that I didn't have to pay for" type of problem solving. As an amateur, I would rather learn the long way first rather than how much money I could lay out to solve the problem. Personally, I did like the kitchen mini series he did.
I have most of the Wood Works episodes on VHS. I actually like David and that he keeps it simple and something that an amateur could do. I want to build one of the projects he did on the show and also find the episode on fixing mistakes was very informative.
Allen
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wrote:

I agree that some seem a little on the 7th grade shop class level but some are helpful. I would like to see the t.v. program build one of their projects using some of their "tips" instead. Otherwise when I watch it, I start thinking about acne, video games, and if I finished my homework.
Actually the WoodSmith magazine IMHO is first rate and geared towards all. I have been taking that magazine for 20+ years and have learned a lot. Each issue has special sections that address a specific detail used on one or more of the 2~3 projects in each issue. The TV show is to generate interest to the general public. The magazine is focused more on the person at actually has tools. ;~)
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wrote:

plans and projects are well laid out, and they do a nice job of explaining a particular operation. Once you understand a set up, a jig, or the like it makes designing and customizing your own projextsmuch easier. I find myself going back to old issues to refresh my memory as to how a certain operation is set up. Good stuff, I like seeing a new issue in the mail.
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I don't have a problem with the magazine. It just seems that on the T.V. show that they really are making it as plain and dumbed down as possible. I really would like to see them build some of the projects from the magazine on the show then incorporate some of the tips from it as well. I think that their readership would go up if it became more project oriented.
One thing dawned on me as I was working in the shop this afternoon. What would happen to the zero clearance tip if you also needed to use the miter gauge? I know that it was probably geared toward ripping (I did watch it but we have no speakers for our computer and I was too lazy to plug in the headphones) but it seemed a little too wasteful and would be hard for most here to adjust the fence for the added thickness. I know that on my saw I couldn't do it all.
Allen
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One thing dawned on me as I was working in the shop this afternoon. What would happen to the zero clearance tip if you also needed to use the miter gauge? I know that it was probably geared toward ripping (I did watch it but we have no speakers for our computer and I was too lazy to plug in the headphones) but it seemed a little too wasteful and would be hard for most here to adjust the fence for the added thickness. I know that on my saw I couldn't do it all.
The way that it is usually done is to set the fence for the cut then put the hardboard downKeeps you from having to use a large piece and no fence problems.
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On 4/2/10 10:12 PM, CW wrote:

They said it's obviously for ripping. You wouldn't have to adjust anything on a Bessy style fence.
As to waste.... how much are you guys paying for your hardboard? The stuff is under 10 bucks a 4x8 sheet. I use it for everything. One sheet lasts longer than I can remember. And when I run out... oh yeah, it's ten bucks.
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"d.williams" wrote:

Norm and the NYW they are not, but they do offer some interesting jig & fixtures.
For example:
http://tinyurl.com/y979uye .
Lew
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d.williams wrote:

http://www.woodsmithtips.com/2010/04/01/zero-clearance-saw-table-top/?autostart=true

I thought the tip cited above was rather lame as well but I did find their second tip of using 1/8" dowel to peg both sides of a dado joint something I've never considered doing.
http://www.woodsmithtips.com/2010/04/01/locking-dowels-for-dadoes /
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On 4/2/2010 7:35 AM, Nova wrote:

The sheet of masonite for a zero clearance insert seems like an expensive way to save a little bit of labor but it's also one of those "It would never have occurred to me to do that" ideas so I can't fault them for posting it.
On the other hand I do wonder how much strength the pegged dadoes really add to a plywood drawer.

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On 04/02/2010 08:51 AM, J. Clarke wrote:

I'd have to look (which I can't do right now), but doubt that technique would work with my Unifence, at least not without making several adjustments to allow for the raising of the "table top" by about 1/4"...
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On Fri, 02 Apr 2010 09:51:48 -0400, the infamous "J. Clarke"

Just remember that this new "tool" can be reused, preventing recurring costs.

Well, since it's primarily end-grain joinery, probably a good bit.
-- It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change. -- Charles Darwin
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Synchronicity knocks me out -- watched the tip, then reading my self to sleep the same night, ran across the same tip in someboy's "Table Saw Book."
Agree the dowel lock tip looks intersting.
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"J. Clarke" wrote:

My inserts are made using three pieces of hardboard and some double backed tape to form a sandwich.
Given a piece of hardboard size, I probably get 10-12 finished inserts.
Lew
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"Steve" wrote:

Compared to an interlocked rabbet made using only a T/S, it doesn't show me much.
Lew
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Hey and in their sister magazine ShopNotes there was a GREAT tip buy this Leon guy in Houston.... ;~)
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