Woodshop Accidents

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Thanks for all the stories. I read them all and categorized them by machine. I printed them out and have a full binder of lots and lots of stories now.
The site http://www.woodworking2.org/AccidentSurvey/search.htm was excellent too. It gave me hundreds of pages of stories.
I hope everyone learns that all tools are dangerous if not used with respect and care. I continue to add new stories to my binder when I recieve them.
Thanks,
Kieran
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On my web site is a list that Kieran might like to add to the others.
From the menu, please select Circular Sawbench Accidents.
Apologies for the erratic formatting.
Jeff
--
Jeff Gorman, West Yorkshire, UK
email : Username is amgron
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For table saws too there is a site http://www.sawstop.com / SteveA let me know of it.
It's an amazing product, looks like it would protect your fingers if you accidentally came in contact with the blade.
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Sticking your hand where it'll get shredded by big sharp spinning metal things is more than ignorance.
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As a new woodworker (who doesn't own a table saw yet), I just want to say thanks to most of the folks who have contributed to this thread. I have learned something from at least two of the stories. For instance, it hadn't occurred to me that having one's hand on the work behind the blade (say, between the fence and the blade) could get one in trouble. Thanks! -Bill
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wrote:

Maybe, maybe not...
The keys?
Think through a cut. Know where both hands are going before you turn the machine on. If in doubt, rethink the operation.
Fear of a machine gets people hurt. Respect of a machine keeps people safe. Know the difference to be safe.
Work safe!
--------------------------------------------- ** http://www.bburke.com/woodworking.html ** ---------------------------------------------
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If you have a radial arm saw in the shop, turn it into a rip position, take a 20 - 40 page suppliers catalog, toss it into the spinning blade from the direction opposite to what you would normally use. Shreds and throws the pages nicely. To be preceeded with a safety lesson on saws.
Rick
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Where do you teach Wood Shop? I, also am a Wood Shop Teacher in TX, although I did start teaching in CO
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Another kid in my shop class was working on the lathe and his long sleeve sweater got caught. Lucky for him the sweater was ripped completely off his body and all he got were brush burns from the fabric. That sweater hung over the doorway for the rest of the school year. Happened so fast nobody could even think about hitting the red button.
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wrote:

Had somebody immediately hit the red button, it would probably have been too late because the intertia of the motor would have kept it turning for several revs, though with less power.
I believe that the safest motors are those into which a current is injected to stop the machine more or less instantaneously.
Red buttons are useful if things are flying off a machine, or it is on fire!
Jeff
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email : Username is amgron
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