Woodpeckers?

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"Morris Dovey" wrote

PeckerDrum??
Sounds painful.
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Lee Michaels wrote:

Everyone beats to a different drummer. ;-)
--
Froz...


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Lee Michaels wrote:

Personal problem. If it sounds painful, you probably shouldn't.
:-]
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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On Sun, 11 Jan 2009 21:13:45 -0700, Mark & Juanita

Heed the noisy warning. Woodpeckers have detected insect activity behind that siding. It's not the woodpeckers you need to worry about. When you fix the real problem, they will go elsewhere to find food.
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snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Nope, no bugs. This is a misconception regarding the idea that woodpeckers only go after places with bugs inside. I've had them poke holes through siding in a storage shed where there was absolutely no place for bugs to be ensconced (i.e, composite board siding with nothing behind it. As someone else pointed out, they peck for several reasons, one of which is to attract a mate (not all of them can use the metal chimney at the same time) and also because they hear voids or other returns that indicate to them that there might be a bug inside that wood.
--
If you're going to be dumb, you better be tough

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As mentioned, the pecking is eiher to find food or to demonstrate that he is/has the biggest pecker around. Sort of like the 18-year old cruising around town in his convertible with the bass turned up WAY high ...
I don't know whether a recording of a woodpecker pecking would chase him away, but that may make the problem worse too.
--
Best regards
Han
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Han wrote:

About the same sized brains, as well.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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Mark & Juanita wrote:

You did not say if there is one or several holes. I solved my woodpecker problem as follows
I went into the antic one day and saw a big bird in a hole in the end of the antic. I tried to cover it with metal, and the birds made another hole below it. I though of all sorts of solutions; I liked the guillotine idea but my wife said NO.
I was out in the garage and saw the cat cage. It was made of wire mesh and the end opened to put the cat in. I took the cage into the antic and placed it so both holes were in the opening of the cat cage. Thinking that would only keep them from the antic, I then added a cookie sheet with about a quarter inch of motor oil in it. To complete the solution, I added mothballs to the oil.
The woodpeckers never returned, but I did have a problem explaining it to the painters when I had the house painted.
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Have a look at: http://www.birds.cornell.edu/wp_about / Cornell University has a lot of information about birds of all kinds.
Walter.
Keith nuttle wrote:

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Keith nuttle wrote:

Unfortunately, lots of holes, they are using the molding board along the base of the trusses as a rest and pecking along the length of the shed. They are doing similar things on my storage shed door and using the vertical corner molding on another part of the shed. There are numerous woodpeckers (it looks like about 1/2 dozen woodpeckers are involved in this destruction).
I need to start looking at good filler material to repair the damage, but I need to get rid of the pests first.
--
If you're going to be dumb, you better be tough

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Find a log full of bugs and put it near your neighbor's house?
mac
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Got some neighbours that you don't get along with Mac?
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Neighbors? Watz neighbors?
Oh.. we do have a house next to ours, but they're snow birds...
mac
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Mark & Juanita wrote:

*disclaimer: I am a bird lover, tree lover, animal lover, etc.* When I moved into this house I had to repair two holes made by woodpeckers. Within a month I caught one trying to make another hole. He did not survive the experience.
--
Gerald Ross
Cochran, GA
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On Sun, 11 Jan 2009 21:13:45 -0700, Mark & Juanita

You might try feeding them something besides your shop.
Pecker like just about any suet feeder and anything that will hold large sunflower seeds or peanuts.
We have a couple of wire tube feeders that we fill with mostly sunflower seeds and peanuts. We get three different kinds of peckers on them (not at the same time) and they never bother the house.
These feeders tubes are made of galvanized welded wire with about 1/4" x 1/4" square holes about 18" long and bent into about a 3" tube. There is a block of 2x wood at the top and bottom with a 3" hole saw hole drilled about 3/4" deep into one side of each block. The wire tube is tied together in the middle and the top and bottom inserted into the slot made by the hole saw. A piece of cable runs through the bottom block through the middle of the tube and through the top block far enough for a hanging hoop to made at the top and far enough so the pieces slide apart for filling. Very simple but the peckers sure like it. It might be worth a shot.
Mike O.
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snipped-for-privacy@anywhere.net wrote:

Isn't that how the Mob works? :-)
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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snipped-for-privacy@anywhere.net wrote:

Given that they seem to be attracted to the dog's food, I don't think food is the issue here. I'm almost thinking that they are coming for the dog food and staying for the entertainment provided by poking holes in my buildings.
--
If you're going to be dumb, you better be tough

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I had this exact problem. I called the Audobon society and it has happened enough that they connected me to a recording. The recording suggested either hanging CD's near where the Woodpeckers did their damage or to put aluminum foil on a 12" pizza cardboard and draw a pair of eyes and a mouth with a marker on the aluminum foil. Not wanting my house to look like a joke I chose the CDs and I have not had a problem since. I had two areas where the woodpeckers did their damage so I hung two cds in each area. The CDs were attached to each other in that CD number one hung from a string attached to the house and CD number two hung from a string attached to CD number 1. I assume the sun or light flashing off of the rotating CDs is what scared them away. Given how may CDs are lying around my house, the cost was $0.
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In Jacksonville, Fl. where I live the pileated woodpeckers (think large woody the woodpecker size) can break hunks of cedar fascia (rough cut 2x4 and 2x6) and siding off looking for something to eat.
I remember the 1st time I came home and found pieces of wood 2' long laying on the ground and thinking kids must of been playing with (sharp pointed) make believe swords. When my neighbor told me what really happened I couldn't believe it until I went home and looked up overhead and saw the damage.
Now to the point, The woodpeckers are drilling for carpenter bees (large black and yellow bumble bees). The carpenter bees burrow holes up into the center of the wood about 1/4" round and then they turn and drill 8-10" into the length of the cedar. Every spring when the larvae hatches the woodpeckers can hear them because they eat their way out of the tunnels filled with whatever mom packed for them to eat.The woodpeckers just bust pieces of wood off until they get to their meal. Since the carpenter bees return to the scene of the crime year after year it gets worse not better. We tried all sorts of poisons and none of them worked. We tried some stuff that was guaranteed to kill the hatchlings because you stick a nozzle in each tunnel opening (100's of them and not easy to get to either. Lots under gutters.) and spray this goop in there and when the hatchlings eat their way through it they will die. WRONG! Didn't work.
The next to best thing we did was stationed bad mitton rackets at every exterior door. When the moms come to lay eggs you kill as many as you can for about a 2 week period. Then when the eggs hatch and the bees come out you can kill some more with the rackets until they disappear to wherever they go to plot their revenge for you next spring.
The rackets really did cut down on the numbers of bees and it was good therapy to smash 4 or 5 of them every time you went outside. I especially liked it when pieces of the bees were stuck in the racket. (Not PC but what else can I say but the truth.)
We finally replaced all of the fascia boards that were so riddled with holes when we had our shingles replaced. We actually replaced the shingles sooner than we needed to just to get rid of the bee problem. We timed it to remove the boards after the larvae had been laid. (Almost) All of the trim was replaced with treated lumber stained reddish brown to match the cedar. I say almost because in spring some bees returned. They were supposed to be hauled off to the dump with the larvae still buried in the wood but I found out the following spring that the roofing company didn't replace two of the fascia boards. When I talked to the contractor he remembered that out of all of the fascia boards they removed there were 2 that weren't riddled with holes to bad so he flipped them over and used them again. I felt like supergluing a woodpecker to his head. In the end he did r & r those fascia boards for me. Damn what a story! I wish I didn't know this story. Robb Smith
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In Jacksonville, Fl. where I live the pileated woodpeckers (think large woody the woodpecker size) can break hunks of cedar fascia (rough cut 2x4 and 2x6) and siding off looking for something to eat.
I remember the 1st time I came home and found pieces of wood 2' long laying on the ground and thinking kids must of been playing with (sharp pointed) make believe swords. When my neighbor told me what really happened I couldn't believe it until I went home and looked up overhead and saw the damage.
Now to the point, The woodpeckers are drilling for carpenter bees (large black and yellow bumble bees). The carpenter bees burrow holes up into the center of the wood about 1/4" round and then they turn and drill 8-10" into the length of the cedar. Every spring when the larvae hatches the woodpeckers can hear them because they eat their way out of the tunnels filled with whatever mom packed for them to eat.The woodpeckers just bust pieces of wood off until they get to their meal. Since the carpenter bees return to the scene of the crime year after year it gets worse not better. We tried all sorts of poisons and none of them worked. We tried some stuff that was guaranteed to kill the hatchlings because you stick a nozzle in each tunnel opening (100's of them and not easy to get to either. Lots under gutters.) and spray this goop in there and when the hatchlings eat their way through it they will die. WRONG! Didn't work.
The next to best thing we did was stationed bad mitton rackets at every exterior door. When the moms come to lay eggs you kill as many as you can for about a 2 week period. Then when the eggs hatch and the bees come out you can kill some more with the rackets until they disappear to wherever they go to plot their revenge for you next spring.
The rackets really did cut down on the numbers of bees and it was good therapy to smash 4 or 5 of them every time you went outside. I especially liked it when pieces of the bees were stuck in the racket. (Not PC but what else can I say but the truth.)
We finally replaced all of the fascia boards that were so riddled with holes when we had our shingles replaced. We actually replaced the shingles sooner than we needed to just to get rid of the bee problem. We timed it to remove the boards after the larvae had been laid. (Almost) All of the trim was replaced with treated lumber stained reddish brown to match the cedar. I say almost because in spring some bees returned. They were supposed to be hauled off to the dump with the larvae still buried in the wood but I found out the following spring that the roofing company didn't replace two of the fascia boards. When I talked to the contractor he remembered that out of all of the fascia boards they removed there were 2 that weren't riddled with holes to bad so he flipped them over and used them again. I felt like supergluing a woodpecker to his head. In the end he did r & r those fascia boards for me. Damn what a story! I wish I didn't know this story. Robb Smith ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Which explains the popularity of plastic and cement based fascia boards now. Particularly in warm climates. Anything an insect can eat into is a candidate for some kind of subsitute that the bugs don't like. These non wood items don't rot either.
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