Woodpecker Rules

Page 1 of 4  
Turns out Woodpecker has two 24"rules, one mainly for measuring ($30) and one mainly for setting up tools($40)-it's called SERX. Both are Aluminum.
The first rule looks dandy, with it's engraved markings and angled edge. I would have expected it to be straight enough to use for both measuring AND setting up tools.
Can anyone shed anymorelight on this (Is it a racket? LOL ). Woodworkingshows is coming to town soon! : )
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/16/2013 2:04 PM, Bill wrote:

For actual woodworking i have the 48" and 34" version of the Story Stick pro. I use these multiple time on every project. Great for transferring an exact measurement, what ever it might be, from the actual project to the saw for perfect length cuts. I use it to lay out reference lines on both ends of the track for my track saw. The story stick pro reflects setting measurements on both sides of the measure. Useable on both sides at the same time.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote:

24". I am planning to look at the 24" one (as you brought it to my attention a few weeks ago).
Bill

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/16/2013 5:45 PM, Bill wrote:

Yeah 24". FWIW I use the longer one probably 5 times more than the shorter one.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/16/2013 3:04 PM, Bill wrote:

I bought a SS 24" rule from Lee Valley mainly for drawing straight lines for bandsaw work. It is straight as far as I can tell, but LV advised me that it was not intended for that, they suggested that I buy a certified straight edge. I resisted.
--
G.W.Ross

Everywhere is walking distance if you
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
G.W.Ross wrote:

pencil lines. I wonder why they call them "Cabinetmaker's Rules"? I wanted something to help set up a jointer (among other things). A selling point made is that the Aluminum won't dull the blades. If you can rest a rule on a cast iron surface, and can't see light under it, then the rule is probably flat enough, aye?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

correct alignment as you tighten the mounts.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<<...snipped...>> i

I think you made the right choice for your intended use. Even of the rule is off a few thousandths compared to the "certified" straightedge over it's 24 inch length, how much difference would it make to a band saw cut?
--
The best argument against democracy is a five-minute conversation
with the average voter. (Winston Churchill)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Let me rephrase my question:
My only "fine measuring stick" is a 12" Starrett combination square.
Do I need more tools for setting up an 8" jointer or table saw properly?
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/17/2013 9:24 AM, Bill wrote:

Depending on the quality of your equipment you need to be able to measure in the thousands of an inch. For example to measure your TS blade being parallel to the miter slot and the fence parallel to the blade you are shooting for as close to perfectly parallel as you can get. Dial indicators which measure much smaller increments helps you get there especially when setting the miter slot to the blade. Typically rip fences are very easy to adjust in small increments and results are easily seen by your eye so in this case I never use a measuring devise to set the fence parallel to the blade.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/17/2013 10:38 AM, Leon wrote:

Thanks, I already got have a dial indicator too. Obviously, the straight-edge is just for aligning the adjacent tables.
Ar article I read suggested "at least 24 straight-edge" for the jointer.
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I assume you mean that you set the fence parallel to the slot (after the slot is made parallel to the blade).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/17/2013 12:27 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

On 1/17/2013 10:18 AM, Swingman wrote:
> ... although there is really only one way to adjust the miter slot to > be parallel to the fence on most table saws, and that is by loosening > the top, and banging it into alignment with all the precision of a > hammer/mallet ...
Made me go back and read mine ... that should be "miter slot to be parallel to the blade", fercrisskaes ...
--
eWoodShop: www.eWoodShop.com
Wood Shop: www.e-WoodShop.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/17/2013 12:27 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Yes, but you can adjust the fence parallel to the blade too but only after adjusting the blade to the slot.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bill wrote:

I would not try to set cutter knives parallel to feed tables on a jointer, unless I had the magnetic jig sold for the purpose.
Life is just to short to try to do otherwise.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lew Hodgett wrote:

One of the features of Grizzly's "parallelogram" jointer, supposedly a step-up than the standard/traditional design, is that the infeed and outfeed tables are supposed to say parallel, even after adjustments, after the jointer is set up the first time. The infeed and outfeed tables move together. The Lee Valley 38-inch straight-edge ($40) will probably come in handy for more things than I can anticipate.
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/18/2013 2:40 PM, Bill wrote:

the spiral cutter head. Thinking a little further, look at the Griz jointers with the carbide cutters. These stay sharp a long time can have their cutting surfaces renewed by rotating them up to 4 times and require no measuring what so ever then renewing or replacing the cutting tips.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote:

http://www.grizzly.com/products/category/450000
All this to face *one side* of a piece of wood. ; ) I hope someone likes my work enough to keep me building!
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/18/2013 1:37 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

_Presuming_ the jointer has the indexing hole/jig of the Delta/Powermatic, and ideally, the spring at the bottom of the blade against which it will sit to hold it up while adjusting, then all that is needed is a straight edge, preferably a hardwood block that you can use to check against.
Raise the infeed table to _precisely_ even w/ the outfeed and since the knife should be at TDC owing to the indexing, all you need is to hold the knife down at the level w/ the block and tighten. Do it uniformly across the beds as pushing one end down causes the other to raise, of course.
You can easily make a magnetic setting tool--Radio Shack has a set of roughly 3/4"x 1" rare earth magnets--forget the number in the set but get six. Again start w/ a piece of hardwood (hard maple/beech/etc.) and make two pieces w/ a straight, smooth surface of roughly 8-10" length and couple inches wide or so for convenience. Place the magnets on the infeed or outfeed table, one at each end of your pieces and one towards one end removed enough from the end that it will cover the knife location when the two ends are in place on the infeed/outfeed table w/o hitting either. Use a dab of RTV to glue them in place and when thoroughly dry--voila! a jig as good as the commercial at a fraction of the cost.
Since the table is the reference surface, the magnets are as straight/flat as the table surface and any small imperfection in your mounting blocks is taken up by the RTV.
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/17/2013 10:24 AM, Bill wrote:

These look dandy:
http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/page.aspx?pP074&cat=1,240,45313
38" appropriate for a jointer having a 72" bed and a TS?
Also available in steel at twice the price.
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.