wooden cylinders

i am trying to drill a 1/4" hole in a dowel 1/2 diameter about 5"long it nevers seems to go tru straight i have a milling machine i have purchase a bit about 6"long at lee valley and a dowel self centering jig but even with all of theese gaget it is still not purfectly straight any ideas gentlemen please help me out i am bulding wooden trucks but can never have a purfect cylinder thanks. gilles snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com
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I'd be inclined to drill the hole first and then turn the "dowel" using centers that fit the hole...
John
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on 6/12/2007, John Grossbohlin supposed :

That was what I was going to suggest!
Great minds think alike - or fools never differ!
Mekon
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"gilles" wrote:

5"long it

<snip>
This is a job for a lathe and a 1/8" x 3" drill bit.
Chuck up dowel, drill hole 3" deep, turn piece end for end, drill again.
Remove piece from lathe, get beer, admire your wor, drink beer.
Forget about trying to drill thru hole in one pass, it's not going to happen.
Lew
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I drill 3/8" holes 4" deep in 3/4" dowel 6" long on a regular basis if that would help. I use a v block jig set up on a drill press. The accuracy is often off because I find that very few dowels are really round and any out of round on the dowel will greatly affect the accuracy. I can keep the accuracy to within 1/32" on a dowell, when I try though, so that is close enough for what I do. If you need constant accuracy a lathe is the only way to go, Drill a pilot hole in the blank, set it in the lathe useing the pilot as the center and turn the dowel. Then redrill the hole to the proper size, works like a charm.
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you could try using a pen drilling vise on a drill press... I have this one and really like it:
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&pT855&cat=1,41659
mac
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The drill bit is likely wandering. Even in steel you can have a corkscrew shaped hole. A slower feed will minimize the wandering somewhat. In the metal industry I think they would do an initial hole and then ream it to size,
One approcah would be to drill first with a smaller diameter and then drill it out with the correct sized bit. It would be best if the final bit had good edge cutting ability like a brad point with outer points of a forstner bit,

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Wed, Dec 5, 2007, 6:58pm (EST-3) gilles snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (gilles) i am trying to drill a 1/4" hole in a dowel 1/2 diameter about 5"long <snip> i am bulding wooden trucks but can never have a purfect cylinder thanks.
OK, how about telling us why you need this cylinder then, besides making wooden trucks? Details, you guys always leave out details. If we know what you plan on using the cylinder for, you might get some decent advice.
JOAT Even Popeye didn't eat his spinach until he had to.
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On Thu, 6 Dec 2007 14:34:54 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

They need a purfect cylinder, bro.. maybe it's a cat truck?
mac
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Thu, Dec 6, 2007, 4:26pm (EST-3) snipped-for-privacy@bajadavis.com (macdavis) doth sayeth: They need a purfect cylinder, bro.. maybe it's a cat truck?
Those funny mushrooms are supposed to be for religious use only.
JOAT Even Popeye didn't eat his spinach until he had to.
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On Thu, 6 Dec 2007 21:17:26 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

oh yeah, I remember them... well, maybe someone just TOLD me about 'em...
mac
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I've been trying to figure what part of a truck he is making myself, only thing I can figure is maybe wheels or stacks for a simi.
(gilles)

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Thu, Dec 6, 2007, 8:45pm (EST-1) snipped-for-privacy@bellsouth.net (CurranCopeland) doth also wonder: I've been trying to figure what part of a truck he is making myself, only thing I can figure is maybe wheels or stacks for a simi.
I don't see wheels, because of the size, and size of the hole. Anyway, be easier to just cut the dowl, then drill a hole in each piece. Faster too. And that'd be awful thick walls for stacks, I'd just use a dowel as is. I have not a clue, and I don't think anyone else does either.
JOAT Even Popeye didn't eat his spinach until he had to.
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The wheelset and spring combination that are located under railroad cars are called trucks. Most wheel sets in trucks consist of two wheels on a common axle. Both the wheels turn the same speed* and the axle turns in the sideframes of the trucks. That's what allows movement.
If the OP is doing this, than he definately needs to assemble the trucks roughly and then turn them on a lathe. That's the only way to make sure it's properly centered.
* Railroad wheels have a taper so in curves and such one side of the wheel is smaller at the rail than the other. This doesn't always match, which is one of the reasons you hear squeals.
Puckdropper
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To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
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(at) fastmail.fm
5" long is a pretty good size for the width of a train car, It must be a nice size model with a lot of detail.
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I can drill 5" or so pretty accurately on my mill drill. but I use a 6" long solid carbide 1/4" endmill. dill at 3k and clean out often it works pretty well. but if I change to a good brad point bit it will wonder.
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Instead of posting here the guy decided to e-mail me instead. I told him to post here, before I disarded his e-mail, but apparently he decided not to.
Anyway, the guy said he makes model trucks from pay plans. The cylinders are for things like the hydraulic lift cylinders under dump truck bedss. No railroad cars involved. That's the basics of it.
JOAT Even Popeye didn't eat his spinach until he had to.
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