Wooden bearing races

I'm working on a project that has a shelf with a rotating table in the middle. The rotating table has a 19" video monitor in the middle of it and sits parallel to the ground. It's looks somewhat like a large donut and rests on a shelf. The monitor will spin around as needed (usually 90 degrees at a time and very infrequently) I initially looked for a huge lazy susan but couldn't find one. I then looked at thin section thrust bearings, but that would have cost $1000+. My alternative is to route a cove in the top of the shelf and in the bottom of the rotating table. In the cove I'll put 1/2" steel ball bearings. The cove will act as a "bearing race", hopefully keeping the bearings contained and allowing the parts to move freely and easily.
My question is, has anyone done anything similar? What problems might I have in doing this? Will the bearings indent the wood and create divets in the cove (from the weight). The monitor weighs somewhere around 30-40 lbs. Would it be a bad idea to put bearing grease in the cove with the bearings? I was thinking of painting some hot parafin wax on the coves and then rubbing it off. This should protect the wood from a light application of bearing grease.
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There are many places that sell the "lazy susan" type bearings you were looking for. A fast google should have you up and running with the right stuff in short order. haven't looked on the web, but I know Woodsmith, Woodcraft, and some craft shops locally have them. And that is not even trying a real hardware store. I'd be willing to bet that Rockler or Lee Valley has them. So I guess I am saying that what you started wanting to use, is what you should use. If you can't find them after a search, I'll bet somebody on this group can hook you up.
Digger
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Try Lee Valley, if you don't get good feedback to your idea. Here's a link to their zinc lazy susan bearings. They're rated at 200 to 1000 pounds, which should be adequate for what you're trying to do. For $10 (CDN), you can't go too far wrong.
http://www.leevalley.com/hardware/page.asp?pageD042&category=3%2C44013&SID=&ccurrency=1
I've also seen similar things to this at a number of local stores, and I'm in a fairly small community.
Clint

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Save some money and use marbles instead of ball bearings.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (todd1814) wrote in

Yes, balls (either steel or marbles) will indent the wood. Go with a proper lazy-susan bearing.
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Woodcraft has what you need. http://tinyurl.com/jo3j -- Ernie
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Thank you for the responses and especially the links. Unfortunately, the reason I had so much trouble locating a lazy susan is that I need one that's at least 22" in diameter. The monitor needs to go through the middle and stick out of the top. I spent a few hours per day for a couple of weeks trying to find one with no luck. Of course, if anyone can locate one anyway I'd definately buy it!
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use the "roller bearings" for outfeed tables, mount them in what ever diameter you want.
http://www.rockler.com/ecom7/showdetl.cfm?&DID=6&offerings_IDS28&ObjectGroup_IDT3&CATIDi
todd1814 wrote:

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I purchased a Sony TV that came with a swivel base that I had to assemble. What they used were several small castor wheels that the top rotated on. Would it be possible to cut large holes in the shelf that small castors could sit in with a patch on the under side of the shelf to hold them? On the TV stand there was a bolt through the center to hold the top and base in position.
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