Woodcraft router bits on sale again

$5/bit for a few different types. For folks that got these last year, are they any good? I did a search on Google and found someone who said the bearing on one they got was loose, so that doesn't bode well...
ken
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I bought 6 or 8 of them and have used 2 or 3. They perform well for the first probably 15-20 linear feet. I then cleaned them and lightly honed them with a medium diamond card hone and they performed fine again. Not quite as smooth a surface as my CMT bits, but for $5 apop they are definitely worth it. I might by 2 or 3 of the couple of profiles I use most and still make out better than buying one higher priced bit.
Mike

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I have had good luck with them but keep in mind that these are basically SMALL bits.

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Ken Yee wrote:

They've performed well for me but I haven't put a whole lot of time on them.
--
Donnie Vazquez
Sunderland, MD
  Click to see the full signature.
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I just rounded over all 4 edges on 40 crib slats, plus a countertop, with them... so far so good, especially for the price! -Richard
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Just out of curiosity, what crib are you making? I'm getting ready to start the Woodsmith Heirloom Crib and it has 46 slats total, and like a hundred filler blocks.
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I made that crib - it is holding up nicely (son is 16 months old now and likes to play "escape from Alcatraz" at times - shaking the bars).
At the time I made it I didn't have a mortiser, so I did the filler blocks as the plan indicates. If I could do it again now, I would definitely NOT do that and make actual mortises. Much more time involved, but the result would have been better, IMO. All in all the filler block approach works, but even being careful I had a few that didn't fit perfect for whatever reason and/or shifted during glue-up enough to notice now.
Mike

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Mike - I was thinking the same thing about the filler blocks myself!! I was wondering if it was designed that why for simplicity since it's marketted as 'shop test and success guaranteed'. Otherwise you are looking at a LOT of moritses. Were you thinking of doing loose tenons are were you planning on a different way? Any other tips/suggestions about this crib plan would be appreciated! I'm tuning up all my gear and the maple has been acclimating for nearly two weeks now. I also have some hand-me-down cherry I plan on using for the contrasting pieces.
-Cliff
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I just finished this same crib (out of cherry) in July. (Two months to spare before my first daughter was born in September. The changing table was a different story...) Since I had a few friends and relatives who wanted updates on the progress, I took quite a few photos of the process and put a basic web page together for the project: http://www.sjwoodworking.com/crib.htm
I was not a fan of the filler blocks, so I went with "real" mortise and tenon joints. I didn't have a tenon jig at the time, so I cut the tenons with a dado blade. This project was the justification to buy my Delta mortiser. It really didn't take too long to cut the mortises and tenons, but the hard part was getting all of the tenons lined up during the glue-up process.
I am pleased with the finished results, and I haven't heard any complaints from my daughter yet!
-Jason
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Nice to see that Ridgid planer and table saw!!! Good looking crumb snatcher cage too!!! <G>

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Jason,
Great job on the crib and a very comprehensive write-up. I didn't keep a photo log of mine, but seeing your cherry version makes me very jealous. My wife was insistent about having a "white-washed" look, so I had not much choice in the matter. Other than the finish, it was a great experience. I've made several other things for my son - now 16 months old - and they are the most rewarding projects of all. We're in the planning stages of "big boy" furniture for next Fall.
Here's a link to my website of pictures of the baby woodworking projects - just finished pictures, though, no in progress.
http://pages.cthome.net/logmanworld/babystuff.htm
Mike

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Jason - what were the finished dimensions of your slats as well as the tenon should/cheek sizes?
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The slats are 3/8" x 1 1/4". I used a 1/4" mortise bit, so I only took 1/16" off each cheek. I don't remember exactly how long I made the mortises, but I think I only took 1/8" off each shoulder. I wanted to keep the tenons as large and solid as possible, but even 1/16" or 1/8" cheeks and shoulders were enough to hide any imperfections in the joinery. (Not that I'm admitting to any...)
- Jason
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Hi Cliff,
I would do it just as Jason did - use a mortiser to make the mortises, and a then use a tenoning jig to form tenons on the slats. Other than that, the construction was actually a piece of cake. Jason's website should give you a lot of clues as to the steps involved.
Mike

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Mike, those slats are 3/8" thick? Exactly how much of a tenon are you ending up with? Would it just be a bad idea if one was to have the slats fit into the mortises themselves, which is essentially the same look as if you would have used the 100 spacer blocks, no?
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You have a good point and I think you're correct. Would simplifiy things greatly, too. I was thinking that it would make sense to enlarge the dimensions of the slats to end up with the 3/8" thick tenon just like any other mortise and tenon joint. This would give you a bit more beef in the slats, which isn't a bad thing, IMO. I'm unsure if it results in a stronger joint, though.
Mike

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I'm using Rockler's transitional crib plan, modified to suit SWMBO's desires. The front & side are still slatted (but now rectangular slats, not those arrowy ones), but the back is going to go a bit higher w/ frame & panel beadboarded look (2 panels).
If I never look at another slat again, I'll be happy... and I have a distinct feeling I'll be saying the same thing about the mortises for the slats in another week. For looks & durability, I'm tenoning all 35 (made 40, figured good idea to have a few extra) slats to go into the rails... and then I'm rounding over the 4 corners, sanding them once-over to make 'em even smoother... and then drill/chiselling out the 70 mortises to take them.
Maybe one day when she's older my daughter will realize how much went into this for her... I complain, but it's a loving complaint :)
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I stuggled through what Rockler calls a plan about 5 years ago with the arrow shaped slats, all 72 of them. DIL request a pullout tray under the crib with access when side was locked in up location. Handy for space limited location as it doesn't add to total footprint for additional storage.
On Thu, 06 Jan 2005 17:22:10 GMT, Richard Boggs

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