Wood Working Toxic Woods

In researching some potential new (to me) species for an upcoming project, I came across this page that I thought I'd share with the wreck.
http://www.ci.tucson.az.us/arthazards/wood2.html
Those who have worked with Padauk, please chime in. I was initially under the impression that its dust was more of an irritant than the page indicates. Also, I've read about its saw dust "lingering" in the air of the shop more than usual. And truth to this?
Thanks.
Brian.
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Brian wrote:

Dunno about the lingering, but I'd rather have an irritant than a sensitizer any day.

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
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It does say "rare".

I don't ackshully recall the dust floating any longer - but it was *everywhere* and a bear to suck up. So I suppose it may have lingered longer. I say use it, but buy a good dust mask.
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Just thought I'd chime in.
All wood dust is an irritant to nasal passages, and your respiratory system. Some more than others. MDF is quite bad, since the particles are so fine and the chemicals used in manufacturing are toxic.
Use a mask when cutting and sanding. And in the case of MDF even if you have a good dust collection system, you should still wear a dust mask.
A good example: A television host "I can't remember which" was doing a project. Even with the dust collection system and the dust mask he was wearing, he still had a moderately serious allergic reaction to a substance in the wood he was using. I believe he was using Walnut.
So play it safe: Take reasonable precautions and if there is a problem, stop and find out what is happening, and correct it. Then and only then continue with your work.
Pat
On Thu, 05 Aug 2004 23:17:55 GMT, "patrick conroy"

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One of the more 'disconcerting' experiences I've had lately was an involuntary sneeze, in the middle of a tablesaw rip of a small piece of such a hardwood. While 'this time', the only result was shaken nerves, I have been seriously considering upgrading the dust/chip collection capabilities of my shop.
It has been an area which has been negelected in the upgrade investment.
Patriarch
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Hi Patriach,
Well, as long as you keep your fingers, you can always wipe the board off afterwards.
So far for me. The red oak I have been using lately is not a problem. The old pine and MDF which I have cut previously, made me feel like I had a 2 x 4 shoved up my nose. Didn't make any difference whether I was sanding or cutting, and I was outdoors in a breeze on both of those occasions too.
When I wrote what I wrote. I was thinking of the twenty - something year olds "or younger" who might read the thread. Too me, it really doesn't make any difference what wood your working with, it's just a good practice to wear a dust mask, or a respirator and be safe.
Pat
On Fri, 06 Aug 2004 15:48:00 GMT, patriarch

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I just finished a project using padauk. Like you, I was a little concerned about the "toxicity" of the dust. I started with rough-sawn padauk, so I went through jointing, planing, sawing, and sanding. IMO, the concerns are over-done. I started with a respirator, but after noticing very little dust in the air, I quit using it. I did not ever experience any irritation. It seemed to me that the wood was fairly brittle, and the sawdust consisted of relatively large particles. Maybe that was why there was little dust in the air.
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Isn't Narra a variant of Padauk? I recently built an end table with a Narra top and experienced no discomfort from sanding, planing, routing that wood. I've only seen a couple of references to Narra being Padauk, and I don't know too much about exotic woods. I DO know that the Narra that I have is what I got from the Phillippines back in 1966. I have a piece 17+ inches wide.
David
Brian wrote:

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