Wood turning tools

Where/what are the recommendation for good but less expensive turning cutters/tools?
What would you say are the most important tools to have for general well rounded turning?
Thanks
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On 9/15/2015 4:01 PM, Meanie wrote:

Old timers are going to scoff with my suggestion. I have had 2 lathes in the last 35 years and hardly used either until about 3 years ago. There is a learning curve to using the tools correctly and then sharpening is another issue. Over the 30 first years I became, with days of practice separated by months of non use, almost ok. Notice I did not capitalize ok. It can be very frustrating for a beginner to learn to become proficient and you need a minimum of 8~10 tools, it might be argued more or less.
Anyway, fast forward to about 3 years ago. For my birthday I received 3, three, only 3 new tools, to be specific, Easy Wood Tools turning tools. These are carbide tipped and yes the tips are replaceable and reusable when re-indexed, and some say re-sharpenable with a flat diamond file. I have not worn a carbide tip out yet so have not tried filing to resharpen. I now only use these three carbide tipped tools, the others are still under a pile of dust.
The learning curve is going to take you a few minutes and you will be turning like you have been turning for at least a few years.
If you want to become productive relatively quickly these are your tools. If you want to learn old school, and there is absolutely nothing wrong with that, load up on the gouges, skews, parting tool, and many others I forget the names of.
I happen to have Easy Wood Tools brand but I'm sure that other brands are just as good.
http://www.easywoodtools.com/
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On 9/15/2015 6:59 PM, Leon wrote:

carbide tools which I bought a year or so ago. I explained in my "Handle" topic I wanted to make handles from the Maple tree limbs I lopped off for all the carbide holders. I've used the carbide tools often at the beginning but I also have a cheap set of the old school tools. I sharpened them and gave them a try. I must say, I'm liking how they cut. Though, turning my handles, I'm using both sets. Anyway, I watch You Tube videos of wood turners with various projects and I noticed the majority seem to use a bowl gouge and spindle gouge when doing the very first rough cut and the chips fly off like butter. So I often wonder, is it more about the wood or about the tool? Therefore, I wonder if a bowl and spindle gouge would be best suited for that first part of removing the majority of wood, then using the other fine tuning tools for the shaping.
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On 15/09/2015 5:32 PM, Meanie wrote:

Since you already have some turning tools, the one tool that I would recommend is a Superflute gouge: http://www.leevalley.com/US/Wood/page.aspx?p 261&cat=1,330,49233,43164,43175&ap=1
It's not cheap but quality costs! My kit consists of mostly Henry Taylor tools and a few from Sorby. Lee Valley sells them but also sells an economy line of HSS tools: http://www.leevalley.com/US/Wood/page.aspx?pV745&cat=1,330,49233&ap=1
Those carbide tip tools are mostly glorified scrapers, which is why you see the professionals using cutters, i.e., gouges and skews. BTW. if you are a relative beginner, don't try a skew chisel on spindle turnings until you have become proficient with gouges. Graham
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On Tuesday, September 15, 2015 at 6:32:54 PM UTC-5, SBH wrote:

I am absolutely not an expert turner, but I need things turned, so I try to copy everything Richard Raffan does, and he uses the big gouge (bowl, shallow straight) to round square stock.
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I love it, keep up with Raffan - wow don't I wish!
I have his book and video. He can turn out more pots than a pottery company!
I watch it now and then, then look over an area and try that.
Martin
On 9/15/2015 8:35 PM, Michael wrote:

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A roughing gouge is generally the preferred tool when working rough stock to a cylinder. It's heavier than a bowl or spindle gouge and given the thicker steel, a more rugged edge.
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Likely the bowl wood was wet, that makes a big difference. Eventually you will have to turn dried wood an dthat is where the technique becomes more important with old hood tools.
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"Leon" wrote in message wrote:

important with old hood tools.
I also recently started using the Easy Wood tools. I found them quite easy to learn and use. In my case I like to turn small bowls but because I do it only at irregular intervals I was constantly having to relearn proper technique for conventional tools as well as their sharpening.
However if you are just starting with a lathe and are not sure what you most like to turn there is another path that might be useful. You could purchase a set of HSS tools from Harbor Freight for a fraction the cost of a quality conventional or carbide tool. Use them to practice both turning and sharpening and you have not lost much. Then you can go on to buy the individual quality tools you find that you use most.
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1x30 belt sander, with a variety of belts. It's worth going to 1000 grit, the resulting cut will be much better. (Once you're there, it only takes a second to refresh the edge.)
I've got some cheapie turning tools from Menards and some better quality HSS tools from Woodcraft. Both do a fine job after a second or 5 on the sander.
Now, take this with a grain of salt. I only bought a real lathe last month. Previously, I had been misusing a Taig as a wood lathe.
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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On 2015-09-15 21:01:48 +0000, Meanie said:

Many people are starting with the carbide cutters today, the problem is since they are scrappers they result in more tear-out then a true chisel.
Have a skew, and learn to use it. A large skew is also a great roughing tool. A smaller (1 inch/25mm) skew makes for some easier finish cuts
A set of spindle gouges, ranging in size from 1/4 inch (8mm) to 1 inch (25mm)
At least one bowl gouge, 1/2 inch (12mm). More if you want a number of different grinds. If you are a serious bowl/vessle turner have many bowl gouges, ranging in size from 1/4 inch to 5/8 inch, with different grinds.
A couple scrapers, a square and a round nose. Many have a lot (OK, we have 8, but the DW really likes scappers)
Then, if you want to be serious about vessels, the larger handled scapers with a few cutters.
Also, if you are serious, ditch the grit wheel on the grinder and get a 180 grit CBN wheel. They produce a much better edge then any of the old wheels, and they are a LIFE-TIME buy, you will not wear it out.
There are reasons I tell people that the lathe is about 1/3 of the total cost of being a serious turner (and we have three lathes....)
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On Tue, 15 Sep 2015 17:01:48 -0400

less expensive than what

at some point all turnings should be well rounded watch more videos and/or practice more if not in the right hands any tool can be used to do that some are easier than others
i have learned a lot from watching videos and trial and error with lots of the error
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