Wood Storm Door

Just curious if anyone has built a wooden storm door, and if it has held up well, warpage, etc? How is attached to the brick molding, etc...
I have a neighbor who has a nice looking one, and I have to think it protects from the cold better than aluminum.
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We have a few of them at work, store bought though. Fairly harsh environment but they have held up well with just paint on them. Lot sof moisture from inside as well as outside. They do require more maintenance than a typical aluminum door with paint that holds up for 20+ years.
It is attached to hinges on the door casing, same as an aluminum one is.

Yes/No depending on construction. Some of the newer aluminum doors are made with an insulating core that is overall, better than wood. Compared to the doors with just a stamped metal panel, the wood is better. Ed snipped-for-privacy@snet.net http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
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We have a screened in gazebo with a $20 borg wood screen door, it lasted 7 years and all I ever did was give it one coat of deck sealer. It never warped, swelled only after hurricanes and only the bottom rotted out. If I had given it any care at all it would have lasted 20 years.
I would think that a well finished wood storm door could be a better insulator but some of the newer materials are fairly impressive. BUT I prefer the look of a wood door.
On our small greenhouse I used a borg aluminum storm door because of the conditions inside and it allows me to swap out the glass for a screen in the summer.
BRuce
Buck Turgidson wrote:

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BRuce

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Insulating value of a storm door is more in the seal it makes, trapping air between itself and the main door, than anything else. Dimensional stability the main factor in how well it meets its weather-stripping.
Which is why I wonder about them advertising the R3 value of the foam sandwiched between the cold-conducting metal sheathing. Or brag about the large window area....
<BRuce> wrote in message

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I made one a few years ago (from a plan in Wood magazine as I recall). I used quarter sawn white oak for weather resistance and finished it with a high end stain/ sealer (can't remember the brand right now). I live in a hundred year old house that had and old (possibly original) oak front storm/screen door, so I wanted to duplicate the look. Mine is a combo screen/storm also. My door faces directly South into the sun and experiences a fairly harsh Iowa winter. The original is under a covered poirch, but mine is not protected at all. To brighten it up, I added a coat of finish to the exterior after a year and again after year 3. Probably needs it again, but there has been no deterioration or warping. I did let the wood aclimate in a dry winter basement for a while before building the door. I got screen door hinges with springs built in from an outfit in Canada (www.nicks.ca as I recall. At least it's close to that.) This was by far the most reasonable spot I could find for them. They came in pairs so thinking I needed 3, I bought 4, then I decided to use all 4 on the door. Works great. It was my first attempt a mortise and tenon joints and I'm really happy with the results.
Buck Turgidson wrote:

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Buck Turgidson wrote:

Although I didn't make them I've just recently replaced the cedar storm doors that were on my house. They were installed in 1952. I've lived in the house since 1977 and have never refinish them. I replaced them after they were damaged by being caught by the wind.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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