Wood storage-hang or lay flat?


Hi Fellas. I have some cherry and walnut boards that I'd like to store in a way that would not lead to warpage. I currently have them lying flat on 2x4's with small slats separating each layer, but my lover wants me to get them off the floor of our basement. I'd like to put up on some hangers on a wall and store them on edge. Anyone know whether this is OK?
Joey
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I'd advise against it, Joey. The method you are currently using is the best way to keep them flat, assuming you have enough stickers and you arrange the stack so that the stickers are fairly closely spaced (<18" or so ) and vertically above each other.
Cheers
Frank

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Frank McVey wrote:

Here's an interesting question... Everyone says flat with stickers, but what do you do if you don't have a flat surface to lay them *on*?
I could store them in the house, but I shouldn't do that because of the massive humidity/temperature differential. I should keep my lumber out in the shop.
Problem is the shop is a shed, and the shed is a mess. It's rotting, sinking into the ground. (Needs to last two more years.) No two floor panels are at the same height. I have an overhead plywood shelf that's sagging and twisted and higher on one side than the other. If I lay wood "flat" againt any of those surfaces, it will just bend to conform. I could avoid that by carefully shimming the stickers to produce something approaching flatness, but that's an almost inconceivable PITA, and seasonal movement of everything would probably bugger it up anyway.
Seems to me under these conditions about the only choice I have is to store them edge up. I only store off-cuts, and the longest of them is about 4' long. Most are much shorter. They don't seem to be sagging under their own weight, and they bridge the irregularities. I started doing this when I noticed that all the salvage boards (scrap tuba fores, a waterbed frame, and similar miscellany) I had up there were bowing pretty markedly in the middle, where they were riding on the biggest part of the sag in the shelf.
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On Sat, 13 Dec 2003 01:33:49 -0500, Silvan

I store wood without stickers on a rack. The rack consists of wood brackets, spaced 16" apart and about 20" deep, attached to upright stringers. It's simply a shop made version of the "wall mounted lumber racking sold by many vendors. I didn't add any sheet goods bridging the brackets.
This is in a walk-out basement shop. The brackets are spaced 12" from the ceiling and 12" below the previous bracket, down to about 4 1/2' feet. The area below is used to store sheet goods on edge, with air circulation below and behind the sheets.
I can store 4 shelves of 16' boards, which is plenty for what I need in the shop.
Barry
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B a r r y B u r k e J r . wrote:

No room to build such a rack either, I'm afraid. My walls are only 4' high, and then they start sloping toward me as part of the ceiling. Every inch of wall space below the slope is used up for something.
Best I could do is put the racks on the slope, and do some weird complimentary angle thing so they stick out straight.
Or maybe nail some tuba fores across the roof supports, taking care that they're level. That could work. Fill the cavity below with insulation even. Interesting.
Think one tuba fore every 2' would be enough?
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On Sat, 13 Dec 2003 11:49:44 -0500, Silvan

Probably.
Barry
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Well that's an interesting situation.
How about building a torsion box and "floating" it on inner tubes? Wheel barrow tubes ought to be about the right size. This way your floor, or overhead shelf, can undulate all it wants and the surface of torsion box will stay flat. Not necessarily level but close is good enough.
Alternatively you could hang the torsion box on the wall and attach shelf standards to that. Again the stack may not stay level but it will remain flat.
Art

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wrote:

Laying flat and stickered is best. Keep them up off the floor with stickers too. Air circulation around all sides will help prevent moisture build up on any side.
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Phisherman wrote:

And I wouldn't put them over concrete without some form of moisture barrier.
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