wood screws

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Looking for recommendations for general purpose wood screws. i mostly work with red oak varying from 1 1/8" and thinner. I just want a decent american made screw i can take in and out (if need be) without tearing the shit out of the head of the screw. (like the locally purchased ones)
I found rockler and mcfeeleys so far. Do each of them sell decent screws?
thanks!
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Steve Barker
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"Steve Barker" wrote:

------------------------------------- First things first, the fastener industry moved off shore a long time ago, at least by 1985-1990.
If you are on the east coast, Jamestown Distributors is a good choice.
They are primarily marine oriented so they have a good selection of 316 S/S fasteners.
I standardized on S/S a long time ago.
If you buy in 100 pc boxes, the premium $ are not a big deal.
I long ago standardized on coarse thread, self tapping sheet metal screws with the appropriate head.
Again, for the most part, use either #8 or #10.
#8 x 1-1/4" are common for attaching 3/4" thick stock.
Have fun.
Lew
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On 6/29/2011 12:18 AM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

Thanks Lew, I'm in the middle. (KC) Does this Jamestown dist. have a web site?
thank again
s
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On 6/29/2011 12:18 AM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

nver mind. i found them
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On 6/29/2011 12:02 AM, Steve Barker wrote:

Good luck finding an exclusive American made screw. For the better style screws driver design seems to make the most difference. Look for at least the square head design and forget about slotted and Phillips.
Mcfeeleys is a good source be does not sell exclusive American. I have been buying from the for so long that I forget how long, 20+++. They stand behind their product.
BTY working with hard woods you want to use a fine thread design.
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I forget why I started to use their screws, but I do like them: http://screw-products.com / I have no idea where the screws are fabricated, but the website looks like this is a US outfit.
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Steve Barker wrote:

McFeeley's does, probably Rockler too.
Since you are using oak, keep in mind that you need to use stainless or bronze. Brass is OK but easier to break.
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dadiOH
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On 6/29/2011 6:52 AM, dadiOH wrote:

Why would you, "I" need to switch to stainless or bronze for oak? Regular steel has been working out fine for me for the last 30+ years.
I do not have a problem with streaking or staining but then again I do not use a "bar of soap" as a thread lubricant.
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On 6/29/2011 6:52 AM, dadiOH wrote:

can you elaborate on the reason to use brass or ss? So far i've been using some regular steel screws.
thanks,
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On 6/29/11 11:20 AM, Steve Barker wrote:

You don't. It's the return of the dreaded "oak rust" myth.
Pre-drilling oak or any other "hard" hardwood is a good idea. When considering other typed of screw heads, keep in mind that the driver is probably more important than the screw head. A poor square drive head on a driver bit will round over and lose its grip, nullifying as advantage of the head design. There are Phillips type head/bit combos that are as strip free as square head or star head, because the head and tip match perfectly.
When choosing a square head driver, look for the tip to be hardened steel and not just a die-punched portion of the steel shaft. The ones that appear to be a separate piece and different kind of metal attached to the driver shaft have always held their shape and performed much better for me.
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-MIKE-

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Steve Barker wrote:

Oak is acidic. In time, it will streak from corrosion of steel fastenings, particularly in a damp or humid environment. The same is true of various other woods, western red cedar beng a common one.
Mr. Myth Man Mike not experiencing it doesn't mean it doesn't happen.
BTW, if you ever need to use brass it is a good idea to use a same size steel screw first to cut the threads, remove it and insert the brass one. Brass is very weak.
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dadiOH
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On 6/29/11 1:32 PM, dadiOH wrote:

Ok, then here's my question. We're talking about screw heads, right? What kind of woodworker is leaving screw-heads exposed on his woodwork? This guy asked about screws he could take in and out, so I assumed it's not for furniture or cabinets.
Yes, I've seen stains in wood from fasteners and my first thought wasn't, "Gee, he should have used SS pins or brads." No, my first thought is, "What kind of hack woodworker leaves exposed fasteners and doesn't fill his nail holes?"
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-MIKE- wrote:

It makes no difference if they are exposed or not. http://www.npl.co.uk/upload/pdf/corrosion_of_metals_by_wood.pdf
One could also ask, what kind of hack woodworker uses nails? Or does not counterbore for screws and use plugs?
In both cases there are times when a nail or screw can be exposed and look good.
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On 6/29/11 1:54 PM, dadiOH wrote:

I agree.

We all have opinions. :-)
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I may have missed it, but I've seen nothing in this thread that would lead me to believe anyone was leaving any screw heads exposed. I've built lots of pieces with screws used on the back or bottom, and occasionally on the top of very tall items, that were not visible.
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On 6/29/11 6:40 PM, Larry W wrote:

It was brought up that they would streak from corrosion. I'd doubt anyone would care about streaking on the bottom or back of a piece, even though it would still be lazy not to cover those up, imo. This leads one to believe if you care about streaking, they can be seen.
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On 6/29/2011 8:29 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

I've yet to see any screw streak from corrosion as long as the wood, any type, remained dry. Indoor wood work generally remains dry, other than in a steam room or bath.

If the piece is subject to moisture to the extent it would streak, as in out doors, then, stainless is the best answer. Otherwise it just doesn't matter, long as the screws don't break or heads strip out easily.
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On 6/30/2011 10:08 AM, Jack Stein wrote:

If the "red oak" piece is subject to moisture out doors, streaking is going to be the least of his worries. Red Oak will last about 4~5 years out doors and exposed to the elements.
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I use mostly oak. Use the gold colored and some times the galvinized (dry wall screws) .. I predrill holes and use bees wax for lube. No problins. WW
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On 6/29/2011 7:43 AM, WW wrote:

Sorry, but that is the advice of inexperience. Dry wall screws are good for drywall.
A normal wood screw with any head design other than straight blade or Phillips is far superior.
FWIW I used dry wall screws for years until I learned/understood why the right screw for the job was the better choice. Dry wall screws are simply too light weight and brittle for working with hard woods.
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