wood screws?

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On Tue, 10 Feb 2004 19:52:10 -0500, "KYHighlander"

You get used to that. What I never got used to was reaching into my pouch and getting the point of one under a fingernail. Still makes me wince 20+ years later.
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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HB; I would guess that your predrilled holes may have been undersized. I had a similar problem when drilling an aluminum boom (as in sailboat) and inserting SS screws. The drill holes had to be just right to prevent failure of the SS screws.
Brian
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I thought the same thing at first. I used one of thosenifty tools that have a drill bit and counter sink on one end and then you flip it to the phillips head screwdriver. It was rated for #8 screws. I tried the next size bit and the screws didn't break, but they didn't tighten either. I'm thinking about taking the broken screws back to Lowes just to show them the crap they are selling. But I'm sure they know that.
--
HomeBrewer

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have
phillips
and
about
When you go back there to complain (which you are justified in doing) you might want to step into the hand tool area and pick up a small pack of those Kreg pockethole screws. That's all I use now and I have no complaints whatsoever.
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There was a tech article by Lee Valley that talked about how #8 screws aren't always #8 screws. One big difference is if they are rolled or cut threaded. Another I'm sure is who the maker is. They claim - and probably know - that using charts isn't much good anymore since there is such a wide variance in actual size vrs. claimed size. Just like 3/4" (23/32") plywood, 2x4 (1 3/4" x 3 1/2) studs, and anything else they can shrink in size and grow in price.
On Mon, 9 Feb 2004 21:47:06 -0600, "HomeBrewer"

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"HomeBrewer" wrote in message

and
totally
Wood screws at the BORG's are just about what you'd expect in the finest, Asian pot metal ... forget'em. Go to McFeely's online, or a local cabinet maker's supply, or hardware store that has yet to be assimilated, and get the quality screws your woodworking projects deserve.
Its got to the point that no self-respecting wooddorker will put up with the woodworking expendables at the BORGS ... leave such trash to the modern "custom builders" and yuppie DIY'ers who watch too much TV.
--
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In my experience, even the plain old Hillman screws from your typical Ace or True Value are head and shoulders (pun intended ;^)) above BORG screws. They aren't expensive, either. Typically about $3-4 for 100 FH wood screws.
Barry
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Yeah they are plated cheese. Like others have said, buy your screws from McFeeleys. They come in boxes of 100 and cost 4 to 5 cents each irregular sizes. A REAL bargain by comparison. They are square drive so that you have no more caming out and slipping when you drive them and they are STRONG. If you buy your screws from them you will not have a bitch with your screws anymore...I promise. Be sure to buy a couple of square drive bits while there.

and
totally
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| | Yeah they are plated cheese.
That's a good one! Reminds me of a pipe organ builder who called particle board "compressed oatmeal".
--Jay
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snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net says...

Yep, HD screws also suck. Go for something from McFeeley's or Jamestown Distributors for brass. I've never twisted off a McFeeley's screw yet.
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Some of it probably is the quality of the screws from HD. However, if you put some beeswax (not soap, not car wax, not paste wax), they may turn easier. I had this problem, and used beeswax, and the crappy HD screws worked.
A while back, someone posted a table that they got off a web site - may have been McFeeleys - it told you exactly what size bit to use for what size screw, depending on whether or not you were using hardwood, or soft. I'd also search McFeeleys and see if that table is there. Sorry I don't have the link, I just printed the table out, and threw it in my WW Reference file.
Interestingly, I used some screws I bought from Lee Valley, didn't use beeswax, and had no problem.
FWIW
Nick B

and
totally
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Why not soap or paste wax? I've had good luck with both (I think, unless you tell me that the screws are all corroding away now<g>).
--
Alex
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Soap has water, makes screws rust.
Most car/paste waxes have silicone, which interferes with the finish.
If you have a good silicone-free wax that you use for wood finishing, you could probably use that.
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Soap sucks up moisture, and that can ultimately corrode away the screws
John
wrote:

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That's it exactly - something about the moisture content in the soap. I think it's the same with paste was. Read it in an article - can't remember if it was in Wood or some other mag.
Nick B
wrote:

you
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Generally speaking, and in varying degrees:
Soap is hydroscopic.
Wax is hydrophobic.
--
Think thrice, measure twice and cut once.

Sanding is like paying taxes ... everyone has to do it, but it is
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Like they said soap has water absorption issues. And it is also a base so can also leave stains in oak, cedar, walnut, etc.
--


"alexy" < snipped-for-privacy@mindhelicalwire.com> wrote in message
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Had some cousins that built a barn from 'well seasoned' white oak and had to put lard on the nails before they drove them to keep them from just bending flat against the oak beams.
--

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"Nick Bozovich" < snipped-for-privacy@nick.com> wrote in message
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Are you sure they were wood screws and not DRY WALL screws? No slight intended, jus asking.

and
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says...

Don't know about HomeBrewer's screws, but I know the ones I was referencing were definitely wood screws -- those that didn't cam out snapped as soon as the screw snugged up. Wound up actually throwing them away. I think they get by selling these things because a lot of people use these only in the soft, wet white-woods that the Borgs sell.

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