Wood Moving Vehicle Opinions

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I use a 9 year old Chrysler Grand Caravan. I know, it's a minivan! But, I can lay 49" by 97" sheet goods flat in the back. I can also put an 11 ft. board inside. The advantage over a truck is it is all enclosed.
Jim in Colorado

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snipped-for-privacy@nospam.bigfoot.com says...

What I have had since 1986 or so, is an '82 GMC Vandura. . .I built a raised platform for my tools, leaving enough space underneath to carry 9-10 sheets of plywood or other long, bulky stuff.
Kim
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I'm going to weigh in with the full size pick-up crowd. My work vehicle is a '85 chevy 2x4. I'd buy newer, but the damn thing just keeps starting. IMHO nothing beats a old pick-up or full size van for carpentry, (or many other things for that matter). This presupposes that you have the parking space for said vehicle and that the ownership of such doesn't create a social *four paw* for you. Dean
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The obvious answer is to rent one of the Borg's trucks for $19.99 for 75 minutes. They are stuck with depreciation, insurance, maintenance, etc... It would take 15 rentals to pay for a decent trailer.
Me, I haul my plywood in a BMW X5 SUV. You should see the looks when I pull up to the loading dock. I can stuff about a half dozen sheets of 3/4" ply back there. My problem is I like having 0 to 60 in under 7 seconds (no ply in the back!), slot car handling, and room to haul the family and gear to the beach in the safest SUV on the road.

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I agree that must be pretty funny to see the Borg guys look at your Beemer as you load wood into it.
but, honestly, that has to be the ugliest vehicle out there that I've seen in a LONG time, and it costs upwards of $40K. ICK.

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On Wed, 24 Sep 2003 03:07:50 GMT, "Mike in Mystic"

The Porsche SUV is twice as ugly, for twice the price. <G>
Barry
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Mike in Mystic wrote:

Pontiac Aztek. Ugliest vehicle anyone has produced since the Gremlin.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
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On Tue, 23 Sep 2003 21:29:35 -0500, "bob"

4x8 sheets, or 2x4 sheets? <G> With the tailgate closed?
Barry
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Depends how much you need to move. Here in UK, I use a 10ft x 6ft flat bed trailer behind a normal car. I can carry almost 3/4 ton legally. No extra insurance or tax and I'm not driving a truck when I don't need it. Downside is that the combination is more difficult to drive and you need space to keep it.
John
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OK, if you're considering a Ranger (Chevy S10, Dodge Dakota, Toyota Tacoma, etc, any of the small pickups), understand they don't come with an 8' bed. That means you'll be carrying stuff with the tail gate down, and have to secure it (ropes, etc). In addition, sheets of ply will have to be put across the fenders, they won't fit on the floor of the bed.
If you go to a full-size pickup (Ford F150, Chevy Silverado, Dodge Ram) you can get an 8' bed (not in the Toyota Tundra, tho). To me the long bed is a worthwhile advantage, in that I can put 8' lumber, ply, etc in and not have to worry about tying it down. You may have to look for a long-bed, tho, because the "standard" size is a 6.5' bed, and they are much more common.
I would advise, whatever size truck you choose, that you get an extended cab model. Having that extra space so you can put your tools, duffle bag, or whatever _inside_ is extremely useful, and you will regret it if you don't have it.
Be aware that a fullsize pickup, extended cab, 8' bed, is a very long vehicle and can be a pain to maneuver (it takes 4 lanes of traffic plus a bit to make a U-turn with my F150, I don't even try to go thru the drive-thru at Wendy's).
John
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snipped-for-privacy@nospam.bigfoot.com says...

Dang, is this a serious newsgroup or what? :-) Thanks a bunch for all the answers - I'll have to post a binary of the "final solution." Might lose an eye to a flying rolling pin, but I think it'll be worth it :-).
Regards, Al
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Buy the cheapest used truck you can find, beat it to death with lumber, tools, logs, other people's car doors, helping friends move, kids (if you have them) and keep your saturn.

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And the insurance, registration & fuel costs alone will cover enough truck rentals to do all your plywood purchasing.
Mike
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"Pops" is right. I've got a '93 long bed GMC Sierra farm truck that has been loaned out to almost everybody in the neighborhood at least once. It's made more trips to the dump than I have, moved more furniture than I own, and even spent a weekend or two touring Salt Lake City and Wendover while I stayed home slaving over a hot table saw.
Go for it.

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Tue, Sep 23, 2003, 1:24pm (EDT-1) snipped-for-privacy@nospam.bigfoot.com (Al) says: <snip> just something reliable to move the wood..<snip>
Get you a decent full size pickup, something with a bench seat. Then you can take your old lady along, and strap her in right next to you, rather than a weeny little truck, with her sitting next to the opposite door. She'll think that's romantic, and you'll have someone to help with the plywood.
JOAT The whole of life is a learning process. - John Keel
Life just ain't life without good music. - JOAT Web Page Update 23 Sep 2003. Some tunes I like. http://community-2.webtv.net/Jakofalltrades/SOMETUNESILIKE /
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FWIW Al, I recently bought a 91 ford econoline work van. Reliable and tons of room. It will easily accomodate full 4x8 sheets. In fact, the distance from the back of the seats to the rear doors is about 10ft. I love the fact that I can go buy a bunch of stuff and unload it as I need it, or, if the weather is bad, wait until the weather improves to unload.
my $.02,
Eric
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Al wrote:

Al, I have posted some pictures in the binaries group showing one way to solve your problem with a compact truck.
If you do get a compact truck, be sure to get heavy duty suspension and a decent sized engine. Some of the base models with four cylinders aren't rated for much more than two big passengers and a basket of laundry.
The following is my blather that goes with the pictures in the binaries group......
There are many ways to move wood, here's what works for me using a compact pickup. Since the truck was going to run with one or two passengers and no cargo over 90% of the time, I didn't want to get a full sized truck so decided to make a small truck work for me.
One important criteria was to be able to carry 4 x 8 foot sheet goods flat, as most of you know the average compact pickup doesn't have 4 feet between the wheel wells.
There are 4 pictures associated with this post. See alt. binaries.pictures.woodworking if you are interested.
Carrier: Shows the sheet goods carrier in the back of my compact pickup. It is 1x construction with butt joints glued and screwed and gussets in the corners. All screws within cutting depth of a skill saw from the top were removed. 3/4 plywood would work nicely too. 2x lumber would be unnecessarily heavy to handle. It has one cross piece for structural stability and sheet goods support. It needs one, more would reduce the utility of the storage spaces under the sheet goods. This bed liner has holes cut in it so I can use the tiedowns. It came that way, but if it didn't I would have cut them myself.
Cutting: Shows the carrier on short saw horses so it can be used as a sacrificial cutting table. You might be able to see some of the many cuts into the top edge. A few more projects and I will cut off the top 1.5 inches and replace it. I will also lower the top gussets so they aren't in the way of cutting or replacing the top edge. The saw horses and carrier have matching notches so they form a secure table when the carrier is set on the saw horses. The saw horses need to be will cross braced to they won't collapse when you wrestle heavy stuff on and off the carrier. You can also drag the thing across the floor to move it if you notch it right.
Assembly: That is a sheet of 5/8 plywood on top of the carrier to serve as an assembly table. 1/2 plywood felt too flimsy, 3/4 was a paint to move around. The top is indexed to the carrier with cleats. It's not a stiff super flat torque box assembly table, but is is real handy. I have assembled 200+ pound caseworks on the table and wrestled them on and off the table by myself without knocking the table over. 1/2 plywood felt too flimsy, 3/4 was a pain to move around. The top is 4 feet x 6 feet 9 inches. I would have made it 4 x 8 feet except my storage space wasn't tall enough.
Stowed: It stows against the wall between the end of a row of storage cabinets. You can see the cleats on the bottom of the top that locate it on the carrier.
I don't think construction technique or materials matter as long as you build a stable system that isn't too heavy to handle. Also note that no fasteners are required to use the system in it's three modes.
Rico
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I used some 1/2" Baltic Birch scrap pieces to make sacrificial caps for cutting sheet goods. Had 2" wide scraps on hand so they got used.

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