wood inlaying tools?

Where can I find some wood inlaying tools?
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On Sat, 14 Aug 2004 15:17:15 GMT, "William Wells"
Better toolshops.
_But_ you need to either make your own, or prepare for some serious shocks on the pricing. Most of these things are hand-made, pretty much as one-offs and you're paying accordingly. A Holtey purfling cutter is a joy to behold, but it ain't cheap...
There are cheap inlay tools around (try somewhere more musical) but the quality of many of them is diabolical.
I'd suggest some basic metalworking (but I would, wouldn't I 8-) ) With the aid of a few "beyond hope" pre-war chisels or a bar of O-1 steel and the simplest of gas torches, you can grind and harden pretty most all of the main tools.
--
Smert' spamionam

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wrote:

How about a good written, or web, reference on inlay technique?
I've been wanting to take a class, but not getting the time budgeted...
Patriarch
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On Sat, 14 Aug 2004 19:26:00 GMT, patriarch

Do you read late at night? Libraries are great sources for books on our interests.
Tools: Freehand cutters can be made by taping a pair of xacto knives together with a small spacer between, then fitting them into a drilled dowel. The trick is plowing out the material at a precise depth. Router bits do that, or make your own mini #71/271 with a paper clip for narrow work. <heh>
Quickies:
David Marks did an advanced episode on wood inlay complete with sand-shading the pieces. www.diynet.com (No, I wasn't talking about the spice rack; it was the serving tray.) I
FWW had an interesting article on epoxy inlay a few years back.
Inlay.com has the best online tutorial I've seen, a reprint of an old 20th century book. http://www.inlay.com/marquetry/wood_inlay_part1.html
www.marquetry.org is another interesting site. I decided quite a few years back that I didn't have the patience (and light touch) to do marquetry. Those veneers are like balsa wood. But I still like inlay, marquetry, and intarsia.
www.Intarsia.com might be of interest to you, too.
And don't forget Doug Stowes books. He's done one or two inlays. ;) http://www.dougstowe.com
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For fine straight line inlaying Michael Fortune made a simple tool from a card scraper. Go here to see the tool, the way it works and some info on making your own line inlay strips.
http://home.comcast.net/~charliebcz/Inlaying1.html
charlie b
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Thank you, and Larry, for the resources! I'll start with something simple, before moving to the Art Deco style things to which I aspire.
I go to these quilt shows with my wife, and come back with SO many ideas. If I could just finish a project now and then.
Patriarch
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On Sat, 14 Aug 2004 19:26:00 GMT, patriarch
Zachary Taylor, "Decorative Wood Inlay"
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wrote:

Thank you, kind sir. I'll put that one on the list, too.
Patriarch
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