Wood for Trellis

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In that case, #2 pine from the big box store
Otherwise, cypress
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I'd use cedar, but mainly because that's what's readily available here.
Not sure of your design, but I've had good luck buying 8' cedar 2x2's and ripping them into 4 equal strips and then using the strips to make the trellis. It's usually cheaper than buying any other form of cedar and for some reason, 2x2's are usually a better quality than like-graded 2x4's. This size strip (just under 3/4" square) is easily bent if you want it to be, but is strong enough to hold itself straight as well.
Side note. When I "hang" a trellis off the house I barely set it in the dirt about 6" away from the foundation, and use block up top on the building to attach it 6" away from the siding. This way, when it comes time to paint the house, I can remove the blocks, "hinge" the trellis down and out of the way and do what I need to do. This also tends to keep the plant away form the house (which is good for the house) and allows airflow behind the plant (which is good for the house AND the plant).
Good luck Rob
--


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"Doug Kanter" < snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com> wrote in message
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This
but
dirt
the
way
Good attachment ideas. I'm not sure what I'm gonna do yet. In my last garden, the vines were up against a wooden garage. Now, I have a garage with aluminum siding. I'll probably put a few stainless steel screw eyes through the siding and use wire ties to hold up the trellis.
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Given that you don't care how long it lasts and apparently don't care how pretty it is, does the type of wood matter. Why not buy the cheapest stuff you can find? Better yet don't use wood at all, use wire fencing.
Regardign #3, if you are so concerned about the environment (an inference made by me), wouldn't it be wiser to add a preservative so another tree doens't have to be killed for your trellis replacment in 5 years?
Cedar is cheapest. I'd reconsider the preservative thing and use Penafin.
Red Wood is prettier (IMO) and last longer. Again, I'd use a preservative.
Do you use sun screen?

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If more of a concern about what sort of crap leaches into what I eat. Industrial chemicals have not, can not and never will be tested for safety.
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Doug Kanter wrote:

I just saw a garden yesterday that had iron pipes pounded into the ground and the trellis attached to the pipes. After reading your post I wondered if gardeners had the same concerns as you do. If you don't want to attach the trellis to the house a "W" shaped trellis might be free-standing.
Josie
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wondered
Most vegetable gardeners I meet share on motive, to some extent: The desire to have a certain amount of food without wondering what weird stuff it was treated with.
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Doug Kanter wrote:

Sorry, I meant - I wondered if *those particular gardeners* shared your concerns. I know a lot of people share *your* concerns. :)
Josie
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Who's on first? :-) I think we miscommunicablated! About those gardeners, maybe they didn't want to make holes in the wall behind the trellis.
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On Sun, 14 Nov 2004 16:00:35 GMT, "Doug Kanter"

Cedar or Redwood are good choices. Teak, cypress and white oak are other good choices for outdoor wood. The composite wood is another choice. You can use wood sold as fence pickets.
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Doug Kanter wrote:

Use Red Cedar or Redwood. Either will work just great. If you want to save money and don't care about rot, then use Doug Fir.
Philski
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Yes and yes, also black locust, honey locust, sassafrass, osage orange (aka hedge, aka bois d'arc, aka bodark), Catalpa, or Cypress will all last a while even in ground contact.
Since you're not worried if it only lasts a year, white oak or Doug fir would do fine.
--

FF

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before
certain
another.
completely
What are typical 2x10s? Pine? It just dawned on me (while setting up the cold frame today) that I built that out of untreated 2x10s and it's lasted 6 years so far. It was never IN the ground, but spent those years ON the ground, through rain & snow, and there's no sign of rot.
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The Cheapest 2x10s are SPF, (Spruce, Pine, or Fir). Around here they are usually spruce but in your area they may be pine and I suppose in some places fir depending on what is cheapest locally. They typically will not be hemlock, doug fir or southern yellow pine which have their own species groups.
How long a wood lasts will be highly dependant on your climate.
--

FF

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lasted 6

To add to the confusion, lumber yards in Long Island and NJ carry another type of wood: Fuh :-)
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