wood for Bat houses

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Charlie Self wrote:

Guess it depends on what and where, but seems mostly overly conservative to me...ymmv, obviously...
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I did some "googling" on insectside and pallets. In the limited cases where the pallet is used to transport goods into the USA and bug contamination is suspected, then there is a chance of the use of insecticide. The ONLY approved pest removal for pallets is temperature. Check the site for pallet manufacturers on this. While this does not eliminate the possibility someone sprayed a pallet with something. Caution should always be used
http://www.woodheat.org/q&a/qafirewood.htm

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I'll ask my ex what kind of wood panelling was in her bedroom when she grew up as child. . . . . . (sometimes Rob can't help himself and goes after the low hanging fruit....)
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Here in the UK, pallets are junkwood. You can use them for birdboxes, but not much else.

Or using a saw / sawblade that doesn't care. It's not stuff you need to run through a planer -- the wood quality just isn't that good.
IMHE with bathouses (don't ask, it was painful) you need a tablesaw jig for grooving the inner "rungs" quickly. The right spacing is apparently important for some species of bat, especially when your customer is asking you for 500 of them at _exactly_ the right spacing.
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Andy Dingley wrote:

Andy ... what IS the correct spacing and depth?
Bill
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I'm not not at the above address.
http://nmwoodworks.com
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If the wood is rough that's a big plus.
Bat houses surfaces should be rough --- so there's no need to plane the wood.
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As a matter of fact, I've used old pallets to make both bird houses and at least one bat house. I'm not sure if any bats ever used the bat house as it is tied up in a tree at the back of my yard and I've never checked it. However, we have had some birds use the bird houses, primarily house finches, and a squirrel family used on of the larger houses one year.
Most of the hard wood pallets I find appear to be made of white oak, there are also a fair number of boards made of some pale, finer-grained wood that I can't identify. It lookes something like birch.
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Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar.org
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snipped-for-privacy@sdf.lNoOnSePsAtMar.org (Larry W) wrote:

If they are US made, most are poplar (aspen). In northern Wisconsin, and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan thousands are built each week. Some are maple and a few are oak. Birch is sometimes used, but the vast majority are poplar.
Doug
Say Ya to the UP EH!
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Doug Houseman wrote: ...

They must be shipping them somewhere else than here, then... :)
Don't recall _ever_ seeing a pallet of something as soft/weak as poplar. _Most_ I'm seeing any more are pretty obviously non-native species but what is, is nearly always cull-oak.
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It's what you've got. "Popple" is pretty much worthless, so pallets are about all there is to make a nickle out of it.
Lots of soft maple and birch - mostly boxed hearts - go into the pallet skids of the tougher types, though it's not unusual to see poplar boards. Not the half-inch fast to split crap like you see with the red oak, but close to 4/4 popple. Doesn't split, and it's strong enough.
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<...snipped...>

Around here, (Maryland) "poplar" usually means a relatively soft, straight-grained but nondescript hardwood most obvious by it's greenish tinge, Very easy to work with but not very good rot-resistance; pallets made from this poplar would not last very long outdoors. I take it the poplar-aspen you refer to is a different species. Now that I think of it, I have seen pet bedding that was made from aspen shavings and chips and it is deifinitely not the poplar I am familiar with.
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Larry W wrote:

Yeah, good catch....I somehow missed the aspen even though it's right there and thought of the southern/eastern tulip poplar even though he also mentioned WI. Aspen is definitely much more likely candidate.
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wrote:

I used pine because that's what was in the scrap pile at the time, plus it is lightweight. I used shingles on top. After 15 years, it's still in good shape.
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