wood for Bat houses

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Has anyone used old pallets for building bat houses? Nice seasoned stuff. Yes a metal scanner is required for usings this wood. Not picked one out yet.
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Typically old pallets have been set down and slid every where. They can be loaded with small rocks and sand. Don't send it through your jointer or planer. Nails and staples are only 1/3 of your worries.
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Leon, Thanks for the warning. But for these critters, they want a rough surface to cling to. Will likely join the edges with tongue and grove approach done on a TS. Fancy is not needed. Still doing research on proper dimensions for the bats near me. Seems there are two type of bat houses in general. One for the males and a larger one for the females with young. The highest criteria seems to be light tight with very rough interiors.
BTW We have LOTS of mosquitoes her on Long Island, but not enough bats

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goaway wrote:
> Thanks for the warning. But for these critters, they want a rough > surface to cling to. Will likely join the edges with tongue and grove > approach done on a TS. Fancy is not needed. Still doing research on proper > dimensions for the bats near me. Seems there are two type of bat houses in > general. One for the males and a larger one for the females with young. The > highest criteria seems to be light tight with very rough interiors. > > BTW We have LOTS of mosquitoes her on Long Island, but not enough bats
Sounds like a great place to use a belt sander and 24 grit belts.
Used this approach extensively to prep plywood before laminating knitted fiberglass and epoxy to the plywood.
BTW, 24 grit eats nails and other stuff you may find in pallet material.
Lew
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goaway wrote:
| BTW We have LOTS of mosquitoes her on Long Island, but not enough | bats
As Long Island bats reach a certain age, they migrate in large numbers southward along the Atlantic coast toward a region in Florida bounded on the north by Ft Lauderdale and on the south by Miami. I understand that in their pre-migration stage, they tend to develop bluish hair and fat ankles...
...while the mosquitos, lacking migratory instincts and the robustness required for extended flight, remain behind.
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto /
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Morris Dovey wrote:

Dammit! You owe me a keyboard. Mine just got ruined with a spew of Miller Genuine Draft. LOL!
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As far as i know most bats are made of ash,so lets keep it simple use ash.....mjh

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So cedar is the recommended wood, as your pallets will not last too long.
Last year I built a dozen bat houses out of recycled (ie. found in the trash) cedar, but never got around to using them when I found out they had to be put on poles! Bats will not nest in boxes put on houses or trees.
I used an angle grinder to roughen the wood. Naturally you can't attract the bats to someplace they wouldn't ordinarily live, so if you don't have bats now, they may not go for your houses.
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Depends on how many batrooms they have.
B.
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I have just built a couple out of cedar and was going to attach them to trees untill I read the above. I thought trees were okay if it was open around the tree and lower limbs are cut off. I need a site that talks about whats needed such as height etc.Any recommendations?
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The important spec is temperature. The bats like it quite warm. A position that gets morning sun to give a quick warm up after cooling down all night is most ideal. Thats why trees arent recommended, their branches shield the house from the sun, limiting the inside temperature.
At northern latitudes its recommended the house be painted black, to maximize solar gain, at mid latitudes, a neutral color is recommended and at southern latitudes, the house may even need to be painted white to keep from over heating.
The recommended height is 15 to 20 ft.
Now having said all this, 6 years ago I built a bat house, insulated it, put it on a utility pole facing south, painted black, 20 ft up, and I've never had a bat move in, just wasps.
Try this web site, Bat Conservation International. http://www.batcon.org/home/index.asp?idPageG
dickm
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henry wrote:

http://www.batcon.org/home/index.asp?idPageG
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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While your bats are a bit different than what we have in Washington (the state, not the "state of mind"), see if some of the information here is of help: http://www.batsnorthwest.org /
We built a bunch of the "rocket box" houses - I used a 8 foot cedar 4*4 (rough) for the top section and then a 12 foot pressure treated for the lower section, bolting the two sections together with an 18" overlap. Makes it easier to transport, more resistant to rot at the bottom and cheaper. The "Rocket Box" houses are detailed here:
http://www.batsnorthwest.org/images/rocket_box_plan.jpg
We have not had a chance to get back and check out the 5 we put up out at the Girl Scout camp (it was my daughters project) but we hope they moved in - they had sealed up the old barn the 400 or so bats had been using for years after parents complained about babies falling on the kids during a meeting in the barn.
mikey
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*snip*

Weren't they also known as "outhouses" before indoor plumbing? (Or were the outhouses known as "snake houses"? Ever been to Outback Snake House?)
Puckdropper
--
Wise is the man who attempts to answer his question before asking it.

To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
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What accumulates under the bathouse is called guano, and is fairly abundant. Keep at a distance from small children and clean up once in a while.
Strange how we get our knickers twisted over insecticide when more dangerous stuff is right under our noses....
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Recent window replacement require the removal of a few siding boards which exposed several very unhappy bats. They had crawled in at some point above and made it several feet down under the siding. I left them alone and they made their way, slowly, to cover. I installed a deluxe bat-house when the window project was finished. Point is, if they nest _in_ my house, I think it'll be okay to put the bat-house _on_ my house.
Lots of bat and bat-house links with design considerations and free plans. Bats are good* and giving them a proper home may help keep them out of your attic (hey, they're good but I don't want them in my house) or belfry.
*I hate mosquitoes.
--
Ron Hock
HOCK TOOLS www.hocktools.com
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You may be right about this but I have personally observed bats sleeping right on a tree limb during daylight hours, in both Maryland and Pennsylvania.
--
Better to be stuck up in a tree than tied to one.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar.org
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A lot of the old pallets I've seen have been sprayed with insecticides. I wouldn't use the wood for anything with live creatures.
goaway wrote:

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Mike Berger wrote:

How could/can you tell???
--
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Most likely the smell. Around here, a lot of the pallets also get chemical spills. I wouldn't use the wood for much of anything that's liable to come in contact with living things.
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