Wood Door Skin questions


All my search efforts on door skins have come up with replacing metal panels on car doors. Although I have books on making new doors from scratch (ouch!) I can't seem to find anything on major repairs for old ones. There is almost nothing on wood door skins for doors in the home. So, I'm hoping you folks can help me out, big time.
I have an exterior entry door with severe water-induced delamination damage (read that as a four year legal battle with the roofers and the tile company!) The current external door skin is shredded at the bottom although it is solid as a rock above the damaged area. Obviously, the external door skin must be replaced but I plan to change the 45 year old door somewhat, which will require replacement of both skins after filling in current holes used for mailbox slot, peep hole, and door latch mechanisms.
The door is much too thick to allow simply placing new skins over the old, and probably would not last if done that way.
Can the old door skins be removed? What is the best method for removing the old door skins so that I can apply new skins?.
Remembering this is an external door, is contact cement the best choice for application of the new skins, or is there something better or easier like liquid nail or ??????
Are there any "secrets", tips, or warnings to applying door skins before I get started on this overdue and dreaded project?
TIA
Bob
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Bob,
I'm assuming that the door you're dealing with is a flat panel door, as opposed to a raised panel door.. You Could cut off the upper layer of damage, fill in the damage or rotted areas with regular auto body filler, then using water proof glue such as west system epoxy, apply veneer over the damaged area. It will require a fair amount of skill to repair propperly, as well as visually pleasing. Also, use a finish such as an epoxy or a spar-urethane to protect the door when finished.
It wont be easy, but it can be done
Hope this helps
--
Gregory Paolini - Roycroft Renaissance Artisan
Handcrafted Custom Furniture & Cabinetry
  Click to see the full signature.
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Bob:
I am wondering if you are going in the wrong direction on this.
If you are going to fill in the mail slot, fill in the peep hole, and even the lockset holes, only to have to cut down the door to the correct thickness so you can skin both sides....
why don't you just buy a new door blank? The repairs to the door will take a a few hours, then to thickness the door can be quite a chore.
When I have to skive down the door to get the desired thickness it takes a long messy time to do it on just one side. I have never done it to both sides just to save the core of a door.
Thinking of all the hours involved if the project went perfectly, I know I could never sell it as a repair. I could sell it as a repair, though.
Buy a blank, moritse, drill it and prepare for locks before you take the old POS out. You can even finish it before final installation. This is much easier than what you are describing, not as hard as it sounds, and the technical degree of skills needed drops quite a bit.
You can use the old door as a template to help you locate hinge location and to match any cuts made on the door to adjust it for closure over the years.
Robert
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Robert:
Duuuuh.

know I could never sell it as a repair. I could sell it as a repair, though. <<
Make your mind up. I meant to say I could never sell the complete repair, filling, and skinning of both sides as a repair. I could however, sell the door solution as a replacement.
Robert
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First off, why should you be concerned. After 4 years, let your homeowners insurance handle the damage and let them sue the roofer. You should easily get replacement value for the door and have someone make it for you. Secondly, for an external door why even screw with wood, for every reason from safety to R-factor use a steel door! There is a point when repair vs. replacement becomes a breaking point, and you said it yourself "dreadful project". Unless this door has some historical value, to make one from scratch is easily more secure and better engineered over trying to fudge re-laminarting the 45 year old door.

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wrote:

================snip snip snip ========
I also think you are going in the wrong direction....mostly because of the time involved...and the cost of repairing your exsisting entry door...vs just buying a new door and hanging it...
I restore cars as a hobby and to be honest rather then reskin a door (which I have done more then a few times) I find that I can buy a good, used door at swap meets for not much more then a door skin...
I see no reason that you could not find a "used" entry door for a home either..
Bob G..

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